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Hearing effects from blast of feedback in headphones
Old 12th September 2012
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Hearing effects from blast of feedback in headphones

Had headphones on, gain at full unity on compact mackie, recording device had its own monitoring on with mixer out routed back in, so when it got armed my head got blasted with the most obnoxious full spectrum shrieking head-pounding noise. My head tensed and an automatic reflect reached up to take them off, like out of nowhere we got bombed and I hadn't realized yet.

I looked at SPL for the headphones (Ultrasone 2500) and it says 94 dB.

After that, for a day now, it feels like there's bandaids in there, kind of dampening and muffling the sound, but in an uneven way. I did a logararithmic tone sweep and there's some drop outs in an ear around 10,500 Hz, and up around there it's kind of uneven swirly, but can generally still hear everything.

So any ideas physically what causes that muffly kind of sensation? It's like you're less in the world, but it's not just a lowering of volume, it's like hearing through bandages not taped down flat, dangling and making the ears full, but not evenly.

I read some about the biology and effects, but not sure what it is. Probably lots here have experienced it. Any ideas?
Old 12th September 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
WinnyP's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
The little sensitive hairs in your ear get damaged, thankfully the ear is resilient when it comes to loud volumes at short durations of time. It's the long durations (like front row at an ear splitting gig) that cause long term damage. Will take about a day or 2 & you should be back to normal.
Old 14th September 2012
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I wish I understood more specifically how the damage works though. Like what the different effects are. Like why with some there's ringing after, or fullness, muffled hearing, etc.

It's been exactly 3 days since incident, and I've been wearing earplugs most of the time because it feels like my ears want to avoid sound and relax. I just took them out for a minute, and it seems to have improved, but still sounds dull, and uneven clogged.

I had permanent dullness before, after being on stage without ear protection during a loud concert in front of the wall of speakers. At least, that's my perception of it, I didn't have a test before and after for proof. Doesn't really interfere with life, it's just, dull, and distant, like when you walk your footsteps aren't crystal clear in your face, they're dull background noise that you have to pay attention to and even then you can't really focus on it as well. After this I noticed more of that, I went outside and the world was just duller, distant, not able to isolate sounds and pull them out with as detailed full clarity.

When we're very young, sights and sound are just so vibrant, like super hi-def. It's all so sharp and you can focus on everything, seeing or hearing so much subtle detail. But with age and all the damage that accumulates, it just all gets dull, blurry, muffled. I don't think most people pay attention so don't realize until it interferes with life. I can still see and hear, but it's like the difference between a perfectly cleaned glass, and one that's been used a few times so has a slight film.

It happens, not much we can do about it. It'd be nice if some technologies developed where it was practical to restore and even boost the quality beyond what we've ever experienced. There's some neat stuff in development with stem cells. Nothing might work in our lifetimes though. Still, it's possible. I can't wait for my enhanced ears and eyes!

In the meantime, I'm actually enjoying the earplugs. It's nice feeling blanketed from the world. When I type, I can still hear the clicks, but it's so soft and pillowy. It feels relaxing, and even if I couldn't ever take out the earplugs, it's not the end of the world. You can still work with sounds with most of your hearing gone.

That's one reason why I think people get too caught up in subtle details. They really only matter to people who can hear them. Of those, most people can't focus on the details enough to even be aware. Very young people can hear more details than you can, but most haven't been trained or had enough experience to be able to pick them out of the sound field. Plus, those details only seem special because it's the max of what most of you and your peers can perceive. It's like when people cared so much about the details of how television pictures looked before HD. Sure, some people noticed and cared. But now? Even the best stuff looks cloudy and muffled in a major way compared to even the worst HD content. That's why it's more important to focus on the meaning in the sound. You'd still watch old standard definition movies, if they had value in the story.
Old 15th September 2012
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Felt like needed to take earplugs out, moisture building up maybe, which I think with the closed heat would allow bacteria to multiply faster. Seemed to be a change since yesterday. When I spoke to hear my voice it sounds like when you have a cold. But the sensation, feels like a wound almost healed.

It's strange, it really does feel similar to a wound, like when a soft scab forms on top, and it's kind of inflamed, then you feel the thick presence of it all, until it begins to fade down back into nothing and feels normal again. It's similar to that feeling, but inside, like a wound covering in there, and its uneven scabbiness interferes with hearing, so it's muffled unevenly, and puffy. The puff seems to be settling, and the scab going away.

That can't just be some hairs or whatever. Maybe some sensitive tissue can actually be wounded by that kind of harsh blast of sound. It did feel like no other I've experienced before. I get blasts of feedback more often than I should, but I recover in minutes. This though really blew my brains. So maybe there was some micro wound-like thing, that doesn't scab or anything like that, but still gives some similar sensation as it heals. Then just some inflamation as blood flows to help take care of it?

One thing I did notice is shortly after this happened, while I was sitting, when I was going to get up I leaned and lifted and there was this wild sensation of lots of blood draining from my ears. I wonder how a loud blast causes more blood to rush in there?

So much to learn! I have no idea how any of this works. Will have to read a book.
Old 16th September 2012
  #5
Gear Guru
 
kennybro's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
I've had this happen from unexpected loud blasts. It sucks. It's depressing, when you think of how you value your ability to hear subtle nuances to be able to make valid track and mix decisions. Fortunately, it seems like the brain adjusts to an amazing degree, and damage from short blasts seems to be recoverable to a large degree.
Old 16th September 2012
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Yeah. That's one reason why I've been trying to keep earplugs in, because the brain adjusts and then you don't know the actual physical effect. If someone's ears are ringing after a concert, and days after, they just slowly transition into the damage and when the ringing stops it feels like they're back to normal, but how do they know that it's not just a new normal?

I took earplugs out for some seconds, and it feels like it's mostly settled in terms of that wounded sensation and fullness. But the actual hearing isn't back to how it was. It could get better, but if I didn't have earplugs in most of the time I wouldn't have any memory to compare. Right now my brain is used to how it was prior to earplugs, so if I take them out for less than a minute once a day it doesn't give the brain much chance to adjust and you can feel it not matching what it expects so you know there's a physical difference.

I don't have an audio career so I could still survive deaf. But it really is something that you have to try not to become saddened by. If you dwell on it too much you'd just want to curl up and cry, because unlike a lot of other parts of our body, the hearing just doesn't ever heal physically. It's more like losing a finger than just a scrape. It never comes back. You can go on, and still do great things, but you're doing it handicapped to a degree.

It's similar with the teeth. If you get a blast there, like while drinking from a glass bottle, part of your tooth is gone, forever. If you eat and drink acidic foods, like citrus fruit, and don't rinse after, the acids erode the enamel, and then you end up with permanently weakened teeth. They can then start losing visible portion, cavities. We can fill those holes in a lot of the time, but it's never going to be the same, you're just adjusted.

Hearing is different than teeth though because our very existence is felt through the senses. It is us. It is how we feel as a being. If we're blind, we're a very different feeling person than someone who sees. If you have a cold, or allergies, and your ears are all full, you sense yourself and the world differently. It's fundamental. If that never got better, it's like being trapped in a box, that's buried and cemented forever. The full potential of you is limited, and eventually the brain adjusts to redefine who you are so there isn't an irritating conflict, but you changed. You're not the same.

I don't want to be damaged. I don't want to hear the world through distorted walls that I just have to get used to. It makes the world darker. It makes me less alive and fully aware within it. Losing hearing makes everything duller. Even if you adjust, and feel like you're right in the world again, you're just forgetting what you're missing. But if you remember, it's sad. Then you look over and see someone with big hearing aid, and another using sign language.

It's not very pretty. We're all damaged, crippled in some way. Some lucky people are very healthy in their youth, but even they accumulate the damaging effects of aging and accidents. It's necessary that we continue on, doing the best we can with what we've got. But it's easy to be depressed about if you really think about it. What we want, is to be perfect and whole, forever. We want to improve, and age up rather than down. When there's a new change, we want it to be a new feature, a new revision, that brings exciting new positive change.

But that's not the universe, that's our mind emerging from it, and keeps us struggling against impossible odds. Beneath that everything is falling apart, getting worse. We're like statues of mud trying to dance as our grains of sand collapse and return us to earth. All we want is to be solid, stable, whole, and dance for always. It's that conflict that makes some people not want to get out of bed. Why dance when you only get a second as you fall?

Without animation, the planet is dead. There is just rock, and sand. There are no sounds to be heard. It moves in its own way, but lacks the depth and richness of higher life. There's no one to appreciate those fleeting seconds. Which may only be seconds, but it's the rhythm of the planet. One goes up, expresses, collapses, and another pops up in its place. It's like dancing fountains of water and light. That's what we are. That's what music is.

Even if that finely detailed spray loses its outer droplets, drops in pressure, and becomes a blunted stream, it's still animation, and something to express as it all fades away. Even when born full and whole, it is only maximum by human standards, and soon even the best of us might seem like cripples, where higher lifeforms pity them and ask why the world has to be so cruel to force feeling entities into such limited forms.

So we just have to let go, and aim for the heavens. We individually may never get there, but that's the beat of life, and every one of us is and always will be a part of that. Not easy to do though. Especially if someone were highly skilled, with precision hearing, widely known and regarded, being given important work, and some stupid accident caused their hearing to change forever. Really difficult not to just constantly dwell on that, and snap in frustration, "Heal ears! HEAL!".

That's another thing earplugs do, make it easy to forget. When you can't hear that something is wrong, it's easy to ignore, and then you don't feel bad about it. I wish medical technology would hurry up and go through some major rapid explosions in development. There's so many people going through miseries right now they shouldn't have to.
Old 20th September 2012
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Still wearing earplugs. When I take them out briefly each day, I hope to hear full again. But it's wrong. My voice sounds like I have a cold. My ears are full, damp spots, everything is just unevenly dull and twinged. It's irritating, like there's something there, I want to tear away, to hear clear again. I'm afraid to take them out, because I don't want to be reminded how it sounds. I've just been ignoring it, hoping when I take them out next time it'll be back to normal so I can forget about this. I fear to have to face the possibility of the rest of my life having to cope with damaged hearing.
Old 20th September 2012
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
You know that morning kind of stretch some people do where your shoulders tense and you reach upward with a yawn? Well, I was sitting here at the computer, and didn't really reach up or yawn, but a little tiny version of that stretch happened, and then suddenly my ears felt like some pocket of liquid squeezed inside and it rushed out somewhere.

Even with my earplugs in, it just felt like maybe this did something. So I took them out to hear, and said something out loud, and my voice didn't seem to sound the same as it has been, where it's like talking when you have a cold. I didn't want to spoil that hope, so put them back in, just in case I was just fooling myself.

But that was interesting. Maybe something in there can fill with fluid if it expects there could be more loud noises in the future. Maybe that dampening is for protection, like a shield. Maybe with time, and stretches, that kind of thing can relax and the hearing open up more. Hope so!

If this kind of thing happened to you, and you found this in a search, even after a week, keep hope. It's still possible stuff could be changing that you don't understand.
Old 28th September 2012
  #9
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I just panicked. I've avoided music, and stopped wearing full earplugs but still had tissue stuffed in my ears to dampen sounds, and mostly have worked in quiet. But it seemed like my hearing had improved, so I decided to take them out and do some online hearing tests. Then I tried listening to music, and it wasn't right, like it was missing depth, and the vocals were through a filter so they became shallow and right in front of you in a thin way. It just wasn't music, it was flat. But it was YouTube, through headphones, so I tried searching for some MP3s, tried Pandora, just because I don't have my music collection handy here, and was trying to hear old stuff I have memorized.

But I can't hear it. I mean I can, but it's not music. I hear drums, vocals, and all that, there's just no impact. In the spot in the soundfield in upper left where before I thought it was really muffled/clogged I felt like it was uneven, like I wanted everything panned to compensate.

I thought maybe it was headphones, I was repositioning them, I found a spot where if I pushed on them at that angle it became more vivid, but it still didn't seem right, and I didn't have to do this before. I shook my head, like vibrations, side to side, I feel the want to do that, like they're clogged and I need to dislodge it. But no movements, nothing, unfilters it. I turned the headphones up, it just doesn't have that boom. Inside my ears felt like burning a little, so I stopped listening, and plugged in monitors to try that instead.

I listened to songs I know well, it's not there. The soundfield is not immersive. I can't dive into it and be absorbed by it. It's not music.

I'm not panicking because I have the tissue back in my ears. But without that, I'd even hear while typing it's not right.

Hearing is so essential. It is a major sense of yourself, your existence. It literally just made my insides panic, where my guts made sounds and every cell felt like it just stood up and said oh no.

All I did was get a blast of feedback noise from headphones. It wasn't a gernade. It was very loud, but it was just at unity, there was no boost beyond that. It must've been under 100 dB, for maybe a second? Now after listening to stuff they feel sensitive, kind of on fire.

I really hoped it'd just go away. That I would've worked myself up over nothing. But now I'm scared to hear, because what I've heard is horrible, and I don't want to live that. There's no music. Not the way I heard it before. It's like if you had an HDTV and then someone replaced it with a little black and white television.

So now I think I'd better call an ear doctor tomorrow. I still can't make sense of it. Am I supposed to wear earplugs for the rest of my life? I know my brain would probably adjust, and I'd not panic, and hopefully still be able to do normal things. But I'd never hear music again, the way music is supposed to be. I'd never hear the thunder and rain, the birds, the way it's supposed to be.

I need music, to live. It's not career, it's medicine. I need to get pulled in. But I couldn't. Not really. It's like trying to jump into a puddle. I couldn't just submerge. I kept pouncing and stomping harder and it wouldn't let me through.

Sure I could cope. I could survive completely deaf too. But when that's a major part of your life, to hear, to hear music, that's huge. A lot of people listen through dollar store headphones, and they don't realize there's anything wrong. I do. I didn't even like to listen to 128kbit mp3s because I could hear the artifacts.

I had enough problems. This would really ruin things. I wish this on no one. I know right now there are people getting surgery just to be able to hear worse than I can now probably. But they probably don't focus on details in music. They don't isolate single entities, and swim in the expansive soundscape. They don't have a bunch of equipment that costs more than a car.

From some feedback in headphones? Really?

I keep wanting to talk about it hoping it fixes things. I guess I just need to find a doctor and see what they say. Probably need to think of myself now as "partially deaf". Wow. That doesn't fit.

I don't know how people put up with life. I'm often seeing personal stories online about what health problems they're facing, how they've had surgery, need physical therapy, etc. When I read them, my body feels like the skin fell off, and everything is exposed. I can't handle this kind of stuff. The things people deal with are like horror movies, but worse, because it's real, and there's no bad guy you can fight, it's just, life.

With my earplugs in, staring at the screen, I can type and feel whole. I don't need to hear right now, I just need to see, and I can. But what if that became all you could do in life. If going outside and hearing reminded you of how shallow your world has become.

I don't want to end this post, because it can't be real. It's silly. I believe I'm overreacting, that everything will go back to normal. It's impossible to lose this much hearing. I've already lost some from a loud concert, and it made everything duller, but music still had depth. This is too much. It can't be. This goes beyond my comfort level, where it becomes a true problem.

But there's no reason to believe that anymore. I'm just clinging to what's comfortable, because I don't want to accept it. People get into accidents all the time. They end up with obvious results, like not being able to walk or feel their legs. They can believe it'll all go back to normal. They might get partial feeling back, and be able to move some toes. But as time goes by, there's no reason to believe it will be better anymore. You're just paralyzed.

How do people deal with that? I know there's no choice, but looking at all the problems everywhere paralyzes me. I've been careful, and avoided big injuries like that. But even in your chair, with your familiar electronic equipment, you can get hit by some noise, and not be able to hear again?

Inside I feel immortal. I feel perfect and whole. It's difficult to comprehend how reality works. That my very being, that feels whole right now, and is thinking clearly, can be devoured, by disease, and I won't be able words speak more. That some hairs tucked away in caves on either side of me can say good night and never dance again, leaving music lifeless.

GET UP! DANCE! Don't lay down and die. Why am I made with hairs to hear anyways? It is like something at the beach. I have a seashell by my coral skull, and in it is a beach, with some little sea noodles that stand up when the waves come in. They squirm around, and that's how I sense music.

I don't like this. I don't feel like an earth creature, made up of all these earthlike apparatuses. I don't feel anything like what I am. I don't feel like my hearing can break. It's not hairs. It's not some sand castle setup on a beach that can be knocked over with too strong of a wave. That's ridiculous. It's just hearing. It's forever and always.

But that's just one thing. One little thing. It's not the last. It's just the next one. Then comes something else, and something else. Pretty soon your entire existence is damaged, beyond repair, and your world shrinks in on you, until you can't maintain anymore and are gone.

How is that life? It's not what we feel inside. Not at all. We feel eternal. We feel young, energetic, unrestrained.

I need to stop writing. I don't want to read what I wrote, I'm sure some of it sounds crazy. I'm sorry people have to get old, sick, and injured. We're really just made up of earth. We crumble like dirt. We know it happens. It has to happen. It happens to everyone. But still, never think it'll have to you. Until your limbs are breaking off and your jaw crumbles to the floor and everything just collapses into a pile of dust. It's all too real.
Old 28th September 2012
  #10
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I just read another thread like this on this forum, and one of the first replies was yelling how important it was to get to the ENT now for steroids. Why didn't anyone tell me that? :(
Old 28th September 2012
  #11
Gear Nut
 
alphasnk's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
It happened to me, it went back to normal after 3 days... But i earned tinitus for life haha! But as with everything in life, you learn to live with it, and dont care much after some years..
Old 28th September 2012 | Show parent
  #12
Gear Guru
 
kennybro's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamon ➑️
I just read another thread like this on this forum, and one of the first replies was yelling how important it was to get to the ENT now for steroids. Why didn't anyone tell me that? :(
Because, from what I understand, steroids have demonstrated some nebulous positive clinical results only in cases of ISSNHL (that's what the post you are talking about was referring to), caused by virus infection, disease and surgical complication; not noise trauma.

Ask your doctor and follow his/her advice. Avoid internet medical advice like the plague.
Old 28th September 2012
  #13
Gear Addict
 
Freematik's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I feel for you Jamon, that is very difficult to deal with. My mom was at a school where one of the kids turned up some headphones all the way, and when she hit play she lost half her hearing in an instant. Such is the nature of life, that things we take for granted can be taken from us.

First of all, now is the time to pursue ANY methods of fixing this if possible, that's obvious, but also, just understand that even if there is some permanent damage, it doesn't mean you can't still enjoy music and life. You will need to adjust, but there is a lot more to life than the ears, no matter how much we all love music.

This doesn't even mean you have to quit making music, there are plenty of avenues to explore, my point is, while things look and feel bad, in this world there is plenty awesome-ness that you could do that is gear/music related!

Also, regarding your take on how you "feel"... what you feel inside is what really is, what you see and hear on the outside is just what we all have to deal with... trust your instincts always...
Old 28th September 2012
  #14
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I have appointment in 4 days. I hate how I didn't see that there's things that could've been done early on to try to help. I did do searches. I did read. But I guess I just didn't understand the situation enough to not be blind to that. I assumed like many others it's just something that happens and it either gets better or not.

But the trauma causes oxidative stress, which then goes on to kill the hair cells. I imagined it as I think most people do, as the hairs just being physically overpowered and being killed directly, broken. It's actually chemical, and happens after.

I'm seeing things like oxygen therapy, antioxidants. You guys shoul all know this. It should be stickied, common knowledge. Maybe everyone rushes to the ENT doc after noise blasts, but I don't usually go to physicians, since I usually get better.

From what I read, I missed the window of opportunity.

It's terrible that happened to your mom. I see sometimes people online linking to sudden loud sounds and people reply upset saying they had their speakers turned up. That isn't even just an accident, because someone else caused it.

I know there's still stuff to do, and you can still make music, but I can't handle this. I'm one of those guys who really narrows in and likes to tweak the mix subtly, or craft the sound just right. My far vision isn't good and I've relied on auditory senses to make up for that.

I need this to turn out to be something else, that is healable past X number of days. Like damage somewhere else, not cell death, and it's just taking a while to heal. Inside it burns still today after listening to music last night. Maybe that's a good sign, that something is wounded and listening to music reopened the wound.

It really sucks when there's deadlines, and you don't understand the situation in time. Usually with medical stuff you can just trust your body to handle it. I did read that a ruptured ear drum can take a couple months to heal. I really hope it's that. I hope my magical dancing cells for hearing frequencies are all still happy and safe.

I think when I get a hearing test Tuesday they should test for that, by having me hear using a bone transducer type of device that would bypass the eardrum?

Either way, hearing is more vulnerable than it feels it would be.

I guess I'll try to buy some antioxidant pills or something, just in case there's still cells dying from oxidation.
Old 28th September 2012
  #15
Gear Addict
 
Freematik's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
There's some amazing technology nowadays, so keep up hope! I have been dealing with a completely unrelated medical condition for years, and so I can understand your frustration. Sometimes it just becomes a grind, but don't let it dominate your mood too much, it can become a negative cycle. Just embrace the challenge and try to stay happy
Old 28th September 2012
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
It is a negative cycle, but it's an easy one for me to get pulled into. Because why should you have to deal with a medical condition? It's like the difference between software and hardware. In the mind, you feel like there's undo, that you can take anything apart and put it back together, any way you want, and achieve perfection, with an infinite amount of time to do it. But the software runs on the hardware, and the hardware is so complex it's out of reach to treat it the same, to modify it endlessly.

You've found that you can adapt and push-start that car, compensating for its steering pull, and using its limitations to still get you to go, and do things. Then your mind feels fulfilled. But it's so easy to just think, why should you have to do any of that in the first place? Why can't you just heal, everything. Why can't you reshape your hardware to be how you want?

It's not realistic, maybe someday, keep enduring, we're all sacrifices for the longterm progress of life. But. Still. Underneath all that, is that free mind, who dreams and can imagine anything. It doesn't just want the car to move, it can imagine it thrusting like a jet and shooting off at supersonic speeds. It just wants to fly, but the body weighs it down.

There shouldn't be such thing as a medical condition. Everything should be like software, where it's possible to work with to achieve anything. If you can't figure it out, and end up beyond repair, you restore a backup of the system from prior to the problem. That is how the mind feels.

I know, you're right, the productive view is to stay positive inside, and find creative use for whatever you're working with. But it's so easy, to want the impossible. When inside you feel like flying, but your wings are broken, and it's not something that can be fixed.

After we're dead probably, in hundreds or thousands of years, people might be more free to modify the body, and cure these issues, even modify what it means to be human. But from this other view, the negative one, that is just sadder, because what about your mom? What about the young lady I was just reading from who was fighting to even move her legs. Or the one who just had 2nd eardrum surgery after grenade blast because the 1st attempt fell off. Or my uncle, who suddenly lost vision in 1 eye, most of it in the other, and might go completely blind. Or another relative who has had cancer in just about every place she can. It's endless. So many people, suffering, coping, enduring.

Can you be happy? Yes, you can. You can enjoy life, and be productive. You can love and be loved. Even if you're trapped in your head to the point of not being able to move anything. Even if you need to use speech synthesis to speak.

You can do it, you have to do it. But still, that negative cycle of thoughts is waiting there, always, and is so easy to get pulled into. Because what person would honestly look at another, with any kind of permanent problem, and not wish it were possible to just change, like molding clay. We all want that. We want to when we look in the mirror and see the hair falling out, or the skin wrinkling. Just take some hair seeds, push them in your scalp, apply some nutrient gel, and water daily. Then your bald head is full again. Or take the smoothing tool, and run it across the lines, and your face is smooth again.

We all feel like something other than what we are, on the inside. Even writing now, anyone who might read this, anyone I might respond to, all seem pure and perfect. None of you have bodies. None of you have wrinkles, or rotting teeth. Your hearing is all perfect. You can see as far or close as you want. You aren't anywhere, you're just this essence, of being. We can share words, like telepathy.

When in actuality, you might have some pain right now, you might have some fingers that don't want to work right so your typing is a little strange. It might be uncomfortable to sit because hemorrhoids are inflamed again. When you get up you might have to be careful because you back is stiff and if you move the wrong way you might end up unable to move and in pain for the next week. When you go to relieve yourself it may take a minute for the urine to flow, and you can tell another stone is going to have to pass soon.

It's just endless all the little problems normal people face, and then any one of us can end up with bigger problems that require more attentive care and interfere with things we might wish to do. I know this is a dead end line of thought right now, because we simply cannot magically heal everything and transform into whatever we want.

But for me at least, it's hard to not feel like that's how it's supposed to be. You should never have to have any medical issue. Everything should be perfect, if only you try. People should be free, without pain and crippling limitation. We feel like gods inside, but then we're not paying attention and run into a door and that's enough to kill one of us. It's too weird to accept.

But thanks. I'll try to stay happy. It's great if you can do it, without getting sucked into negative thought cycles. It's just so hard to accept that any dream isn't possible. Reality isn't like the world we have in our minds.
Old 29th September 2012
  #17
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Forget about regrowing hair cells.
Hair Cell Regeneration
Look how complicated it is to try to do that. There's no way that'll happen in our lifetimes.

There's cochlear implants. But they're really low quality.

Ears just seem like teeth today, where your only hope is preservation, but even when you try they still degrade as you age, and accidents happen. Enjoy it while you have it, because once it's gone, I don't think there'll be any technology to change that before you die.
Old 29th September 2012
  #18
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Wow.

I haven't read all of this, but I feel for you.

Firstly - I think you're making it worse by wearing earplugs all the time. By all means carry a pair, put them in if you're doing louder than normal activities - even if you're out on the street, to avoid bus screeches etc. But if you're just doing normal stuff - don't have them in. Regular sound isn't going to hurt your ears further, and in all probability you're confusing your brain into not being able to re-adjust back to normal.

Plus there's probably some sort of psychological effect going on. You're so focussed that something is wrong, you'd hear something "different" even if it wasn't.

If your ears kind of "pop" when you yawn, chances are you're just a bit bunged up. I get this from time to time;particularly in my right ear, and it feels like you're going a bit deaf on one side (really worried me the first time it happened). A decongestant like Sudafed helps a lot. Have you tried that?

But really - take the ear plugs out when they're not necessary. It's just not a good idea.
Old 29th September 2012
  #19
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
The day after it happened I did some searches, and the administrator of this forum wrote that he thought the best thing to do was give your ears quiet time. I felt that way in the past, so I went with the earplugs to give it time to rest in silence.

But it was 2 weeks, and I needed to hear. I listened to music and apparently I wasn't ready because now my hearing actually feels painful, and is ringing. It wasn't like this the other day. I made it worse again. With earplugs in it's just like it's on fire, with all these ringing tones in the background. There's usually just one little ringing one, now there's multiples. It feels pretty bad, like they're hurt. It's not major, like oww oww, it's just this very subtle sensitive pain, and the ringing sounds like an alarm at a place when there's emergency. So it feels like they're screaming, and sore, and I'm not sure if I should force them to hear yet.

I went to the drug store but they didn't have everything, so I just bought some stuff I saw listed as possibly helping: CoQ10, magnesium, B-complex (with C), ginkgo biloba (doubts about this one).

I could take out the earplugs, it's just trying to hear music last night really made it worse. I don't know what to do. I truly wish it was all psychological effect. It isn't though. That's why I freaked out last night and kept trying to force the music, but it just didn't work, it's not music anymore.

Maybe if the pain sensitivity feeling goes away and the ringing fades I'd feel better taking out the earplugs. I don't know, since this happened I've had no clear understand and no prescribed path of what to do. I feel like I've just been guessing, and doing it wrong.
Old 29th September 2012
  #20
Gear Nut
 
alphasnk's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
My dude you really need to stop thinking about it. I know it's hard, my first 4 months with tinitus have been horrible, stressful etc... I couldnt sleep at all, i had to go out and walk in paris at random until i was exhausted then i could fall asleep..

Dont wear earplugs for anything apart from live shows, rehearsals, studio etc... cuz otherwise you'll developp hyperacusis.

Try to find your own mental tricks to avoid thinking about it, dont read forums on the topic, people are often in state of shock, and reading about it will only make you more conscious about it, thus more inclined to develop hyperacusis!

I feel your struggle, but dont worry, even if silence wont ever be the same, life will still be beautiful !
Old 29th September 2012
  #21
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I'm not thinking about the ringing much. It was a burning sensitive ringing after listening to loud music for around 20 minutes. But that's settled, where I still hear the ringing and noise if I pay attention, but it's not really burning or painful anymore and it's not so loud it's up in the air like emergency sirens.

But I'm not sure why people think earplugs out would be good while you hope your hearing heals. Seems like it'd be harder for the cells to repair damage if they're being moved around by sound waves.

It's really hard to not think about it when your entire hearing has changed. Ignoring tinnitus ringing is easy. But when you can't even hear music right anymore, or the typing of your keys, or your own voice, there's nothing to ignore. It's just, your world.

I don't want to adjust to that. It's like if someone put $1 plastic sunglasses over your eyes and scratched them, then said, here, this is how you'll see the world for the rest of your life. You'll never see yourself in the mirror how you're used to, you'll never see the sunset how it was.

It's easier to deal with being mostly deaf with earplugs in, because they make everything low frequency, so it's less obvious that anything changed. Every sound, is just a muffled barely audible one. If I took them out, I'd hear the high frequencies, and how the spectrum isn't right, how it's all filtered and missing lots of information.
Old 29th September 2012
  #22
Gear Addict
 
Scott003's Avatar
I was outside at a gig checking out a crazy storm that was blowing rain, and lightning struck like 200 yards away, loudest ****ing thing I've ever heard, my ears were reeling for a few days. Sucks real bad
Old 29th September 2012
  #23
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
That's interesting. I was trying to think of ways people would experience acoustic trauma in the wild, before amplifiers and machines. Seems rare, but thunder would be one.
Old 30th September 2012
  #24
Gear Addict
 
Scott003's Avatar
Yea, musta been like 140? Id say a framing nailer is like 120 next to your face, transient at least, and holy damn was the thunderclap louder
Old 1st October 2012
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Should I cancel my appointment? From what I read, there's mainly only oral steroids, injected steroids, oxygen therapy, and vitamins. The oxygen sessions cost thousands of dollars. The oral steroids go through your entire body so can cause other problems. The injections are right in your ear and the perforation might not heal, and I read something mentioning it might've caused some people to go deaf.

I also read that the hearing test sometimes involves things like an acoustic reflex test where they insert a tube and there's a blast of sound or something repeatedly. People online wrote these stories how that caused them tinnitus and hyperacusis. I'd ask if any tests involved any loud sounds and skip those, but from what I read the hearing tests are really basic and if you can hear something like 25 dB then you pass. That it's not sensitive or anything, so it only measures severe loss.

I just figure I'd go, the hearing test would pass so they'd not care because I didn't lose enough hearing to be deaf. Then he'd look in my ear for a second, not see anything major, and just say well he could prescribe some prednisone to see if that does anything. But I'm not sure I want to take that stuff. It seems like maybe it's a waste, and I'd be better off just taking the vitamins and antioxidants and accepting whatever is permanent.

But I don't know. I didn't ask, but based on past experience the bill could be something ridiculous, like $500 for a hearing test and quick consultation. Who knows, maybe it's even more. Then I read it's over $500 per oxygen therapy session, and you need several. So, maybe I should cancel. Maybe people should just be quick to take the right vitamins and antioxidants, and skip the ENT doc. Or am I missing something again? I'd need to cancel tomorrow.
Old 1st October 2012
  #26
Lives for gear
 
ssaudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I totally understand you are worried, but:

Unless you are really unlucky (and if you are, there's nothing you can do about it), it will pass - your subsequent stressing over it will only exacerbate the situation and ultimately make it worse and/or longer to recover from.
The 'medical' remedies you mention are all a complete waste of time and money.
De-stress yourself, lose the paranoia and be healthy i.e. exercise, no caffeine and low salt intake.

As per the good advice of others above, lose the earplugs too - OK in potentially noisy environments, but pointless in 'general' conditions.

Good luck...

ps by all means get an Ear Test/ENT check up, just don't expect a 'cure' as such.

Last edited by ssaudio; 1st October 2012 at 06:41 AM.. Reason: ps
Old 1st October 2012
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I hear you, but knowing you're likely to have permanent loss, are you one who can skip out on meeting with a supposed expert? What if they know something you don't, and could've helped?

In a way it's easier to relax, and just embrace whatever happens. But don't you have other people yelling at you to go to the doctor, saying you're stupid if you don't go? It says you're in Scotland, so maybe it's different over there. Here, if almost anything happens medically, everyone says to go to the doctor, you need to go to the doctor, don't try to handle it yourself, you're not a doctor, etc.
Old 1st October 2012
  #28
Lives for gear
 
ssaudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I'm just passing on advice I've picked up from over the 47 odd years I've been in this business, the yearly ENT visits and my involvement with various associated groups. I can''t do any more than that.

In Scotland (and the rest of the UK), excellent Health Care is 'free', so there's no excuse not to use it, and I always have and will continue to do so. However, that doesn't change the advice I've given and will continue to give.

ps if you do have permanent hearing loss (and I'm willing to bet you don't), currently, there's next to nothing that can be done for you bar hearing aid(s) - there is much hope with stem cell research, but that'll be a while yet and won't help everyone.

Last edited by ssaudio; 1st October 2012 at 06:56 AM.. Reason: ps
Old 1st October 2012
  #29
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Wow, yearly visits. Okay, thanks for your advice.
Old 1st October 2012
  #30
Lives for gear
 
ssaudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Well, yearly over the past 26 years, only sporadically before that period.


Take it easy ;-)
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