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cloud advice
Old 13th March 2014
  #1
Gear Nut
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
cloud advice

hey all,

so i recently put in a cloud into my mixing room and i wanted some advice on it.

my room dimensions are roughly 1f ft high 12w x 18l

i initially had the cloud about 7 ft high above my head in the listening position.

i raised it bc i felt like it was losing some definition in the high end. so its at about 10ft high now. but i seem to be hearing something that sounds liek distortion in my speakers. I think theres a lot of reflectioning going on, not sure how to explain it but i've been having some serious difficulty finding confidence in my mixes since the adjustment.

i was just wondering what the common idea is for clouds and how high i should have it where i should put it etc.
Old 19th March 2014
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Friedemann's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Just out of couriosity, what made you feel you need a cloud in the first place? I mean what was the original problem you tried to solve with it?
Old 19th March 2014
  #3
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
See the following video on early reflection points.
Video Early or First Reflection Points - GIK Acoustics
Old 20th March 2014
  #4
JWL
Lives for gear
 
JWL's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
The height of the cloud doesn't make a huge difference in terms of high frequency absorption. The idea is to put the cloud somewhere in the reflective path the sound would take when it bounces off the ceiling toward your ears.

The lower the cloud, the smaller it can be, because it is closer. Think of the "shadow" it casts relative to the sound coming up to it. The cloud being closer to the sound source (ie, the "light bulb" in teh visualization) creates a bigger shadow. To achieve the same coverage area with panels up on the ceiling you will need more panels.

If your cloud is thick enough to absorb bass frequencies then that's also part of the equation. You want to put the cloud where there is the most bass to absorb. Often this is within a foot or so of the ceiling.
Old 22nd March 2014 | Show parent
  #5
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Jolida's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwl ➑️
You want to put the cloud where there is the most bass to absorb. Often this is within a foot or so of the ceiling.
Interesting. So its best to be as close to the ceiling as possible. Ive installed an 8ft by 10ft cloud made using 8" fluffy, suspended at 16" off the ceiling. Since it was a big cloud, I had no opportunity to vary the gap & measure, so I took a chance & left a 16" airgap above it. Now your post makes me wonder if I did right..
Old 22nd March 2014
  #6
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sheggs's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Are you easily able to move it closer to the ceiling to deal with the lows. How did you suspend it?
Old 22nd March 2014 | Show parent
  #7
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Jolida's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheggs ➑️
Are you easily able to move it closer to the ceiling to deal with the lows. How did you suspend it?
Attached Thumbnails
cloud advice-20140323_001856.jpg   cloud advice-20140323_001842.jpg   cloud advice-20140323_001804.jpg  
Old 22nd March 2014
  #8
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Close

A small cloud needs to be closer to the ceiling. Otherwise it is relatively speaking, an island out in the middle of nowhere. Waves will just pass by without noticing it, the returning ones bounced from the ceiling even more so.
A large cloud on the other hand will function down to very low frequencies if it is spaced away from the ceiling a lot. e.g. Thin 25mm acoustic tiles (705) spaced 16 inches from a concrete boundary above, are very absorbent down to LF.

DD
Old 22nd March 2014
  #9
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I would strongly advice using 4" for the cloud and as much as a air gap as possible.

Plus one to what Dandan is saying.
Old 23rd March 2014 | Show parent
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Jolida's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanDan ➑️
A small cloud needs to be closer to the ceiling. Otherwise it is relatively speaking, an island out in the middle of nowhere. Waves will just pass by without noticing it, the returning ones bounced from the ceiling even more so.
A large cloud on the other hand will function down to very low frequencies if it is spaced away from the ceiling a lot. e.g. Thin 25mm acoustic tiles (705) spaced 16 inches from a concrete boundary above, are very absorbent down to LF.

DD
So u feel a substantial coverage using an 8 inch panel suspended 16 inches from the ceiling would not have any 'downside'..?
Old 23rd March 2014 | Show parent
  #11
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolida ➑️
So u feel a substantial coverage using an 8 inch panel suspended 16 inches from the ceiling would not have any 'downside'..?
that would work pretty well.
Old 23rd March 2014
  #12
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Good

No downside.
DD
Old 23rd March 2014
  #13
Lives for gear
 
Jolida's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Great. Thanks..
Old 28th March 2014
  #14
Gear Nut
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Awesome! Thanks for all the responses. I have 2x4x4 panels x2 attached and over my head in the listening position. It's odd but I noticed that my low miss got harder to pinpoint since I moved it up about 2 ft. My cloud is about 1.5 ft from my ceiling now.


I'm going to put up 4 2x4x7 panels as clouds this weekend and take down the 4in panels I have now.


Hopefully this will help
Old 28th March 2014 | Show parent
  #15
Gear Nut
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwl ➑️
The height of the cloud doesn't make a huge difference in terms of high frequency absorption. The idea is to put the cloud somewhere in the reflective path the sound would take when it bounces off the ceiling toward your ears.

The lower the cloud, the smaller it can be, because it is closer. Think of the "shadow" it casts relative to the sound coming up to it. The cloud being closer to the sound source (ie, the "light bulb" in teh visualization) creates a bigger shadow. To achieve the same coverage area with panels up on the ceiling you will need more panels.

If your cloud is thick enough to absorb bass frequencies then that's also part of the equation. You want to put the cloud where there is the most bass to absorb. Often this is within a foot or so of the ceiling.

That's exactly the advice I needed to hear. Thanks
Old 28th March 2014
  #16
Gear Nut
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
My ceiling is 13 ft high. When I had it at 8ft high it was nice but my mixes would come lacking in highs.

Now at 10ft my mixes feel thin and bass feels a bit muddy. And vocals seem thin
Old 2nd April 2014
  #17
Gear Nut
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater

Here's a picture of the clouds i installed! thanks for the advice i think it has definitely helped the room a great ton. doing research on diy diffusors now.
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