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Cloud Placement in Mix room
Old 4th March 2014
  #1
Gear Addict
 
TeamContra's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Cloud Placement in Mix room

Hi guys, I have a few GIK Panels I'm going to use as a cloud. It's going to hang above my control/mix position. Someone explained to me I should have them slanted lower to my monitors and going up, like a slant for standing waves. I want to know does it really matter if I just have them straight above or should I have them in a slant? My room is small like 10x12.
Old 4th March 2014
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Miiko's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I can't tell you for sure but all the studios I've been in have had flat clouds, granted only 5 or 6 professional build out studios, that's been my experience.

I should add to this that the ceilings always go from low to high toward the back of the room, but the clouds are flat.
Old 4th March 2014
  #3
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sheggs's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Hi,

When they are slanted, they have usually been tested in the different positions first. We recommend using chain on the back of the panels to help with this as it makes it easier to adjust the angle, link by link. I would use a programme like REW to do the testing -
Room EQ Wizard Tutorial - GIK Acoustics
Old 4th March 2014
  #4
Old 4th March 2014
  #5
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Jens said it pretty well in that thread Dan Dan linked too.

Quote:
The only advantage (apart from possibly esthetic) of mounting an absorber (assuming broadband and not partially reflective) at an angel in the ceiling, is to gain depth behind the panel (and thus better low frequency performance) at one end, while keeping some ceiling height at the other end. If possible: Mount the panel with as much air gap behind as possible (or even better; fill the entire depth, or at least half of it, with wool of appropriate flow resistivity for the given depth), even if it does not result in an angel relative to opposite surface; again; assuming broadband absorption panel.
I will say that if you angle it to gain more of a gap then I would just lower the whole thing, to make it work even better.
Old 4th March 2014
  #6
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
HF

Mmm, that's not what I meant by the link. I just meant that we have teased this out before. Quite a few GS have shown quite large improvements in HF reflection reduction caused by angling fibre traps. e.g. ETC spikes dropping from the -20dB region to the -30.
But this of course has nothing to do with standing waves. If the cloud is very big I would expect changes of angle to change the LF absorption range a little. Very big.
DD
Old 4th March 2014
  #7
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Not saying not to angle it, I would just rather space the whole panel off the ceiling further.
Old 4th March 2014
  #8
JWL
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JWL's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
In my experience, the only time one definitely should angle an absorber is that if it isn't a full-on high frequency absorber. For instance, our bass traps are voiced to give maximum bass absorption, with less high frequency absorption so that they are semi-reflective in the highs. If using these panels at reflection points, it makes sense to angle them so that those high frequency reflections are "aimed" away from the listener's ears.

If the panel is a full-on high frequency absorber, then it doesn't matter much if it is angled or not, though the gap will help as explained above.
Old 4th March 2014
  #9
Gear Addict
 
TeamContra's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Well my thing is if those 244 panels will hold, the beam above me is not close to me. I guess I'll have to see.
Old 4th March 2014 | Show parent
  #10
Gear Addict
 
TeamContra's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwl ➑️
In my experience, the only time one definitely should angle an absorber is that if it isn't a full-on high frequency absorber. For instance, our bass traps are voiced to give maximum bass absorption, with less high frequency absorption so that they are semi-reflective in the highs. If using these panels at reflection points, it makes sense to angle them so that those high frequency reflections are "aimed" away from the listener's ears.

If the panel is a full-on high frequency absorber, then it doesn't matter much if it is angled or not, though the gap will help as explained above.
The panels will be used for absorption only. My main issue is the low end.
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