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The world in which we live in
Old 22nd January 2013
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
The world in which we live in

I have always had an curious mind and I remember posting to gearslutz along time ago about what the effect of feeling a room with different density gases (hypothetically) would have on sounds. After hearing so many people's varied responses about the same pair of monitors, that live in very different places in the world, on this forum, It does make me wonder how much our environment ( altitude, humidity, variants in the earths gravity/magnetic fields) effect the performance of equipment, especially speakers. I know a persons tastes and opinions are a much bigger factor, but I know I get out of breath walking up stairs in the mountains and that surely has to effect air density and consequently speaker response right? Any thoughts or experiences on this subject?
Old 22nd January 2013
  #2
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
That's a interesting question....... Subscribed....
Old 23rd January 2013
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Not a whole lot of early takers. I have a feeling I'd get my answer faster with a physics book and aural analysis tools.
Old 23rd January 2013
  #4
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
I know that in the past Stereophile magazine would comment about testing panel speakers at their then new high altitude headquarters. (Santa Fe, New Mexico)
Old 23rd January 2013
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Did they mention why they tested there? Was it more reliable? I wonder if places in high altitude have less changes in humidity?
Old 23rd January 2013
  #6
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Rod Gervais's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I suppose the answer would be meaningful if one could uproot a studio and move it around with them.

However - I don't know of any studios that are exactly the same even at sea level - and in each of those any set of speakers may well have totally different reactions/effects within those spaces - so with the exception of pure curiosity - I see no reason the answer would be of interest.

I just can't picture a practical reason for the data.

Rod
Old 23rd January 2013 | Show parent
  #7
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Dange's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater ➑️
I know that in the past Stereophile magazine would comment about testing panel speakers at their then new high altitude headquarters. (Santa Fe, New Mexico)
Temperature matters not air pressure.

http://www.sengpielaudio.com/SpeedOfSoundPressure.pdf

Quote:
The speed of sound c in air is only dependent on the temperature. It is completely independent of the air pressure p.
Reason: The air pressure and the air density are proportional to each other at the same temperature.
This means in Eq. 1: The ratio p0 / rho0 is always constant.
The speed of sound in air depends on the density of air and the density of air depends on the temperature.
Therefore the speed of sound is the same on a mountain peak as it is at sea level, provided that the temperature is the same.
So if their high altitude HQ is at ambient room temperature there will be no difference. Maybe the altitude is having a physiological effect on the listeners/testers..... or maybe they just want to boast they have a high altitude HQ in Santa Fe, New Mexico
Old 23rd January 2013 | Show parent
  #8
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Jens Eklund's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dange ➑️
Temperature matters not air pressure.
+1

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/studi...-question.html
Old 23rd January 2013
  #9
Lives for gear
 
avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
As altitude increases, the air density decreases. This lowers the the air's impedance. The efficiency of the speaker would be reduced, due greater mismatch between the cone and the air. Low frequency enclosures, sealed boxes, sealed and tuned, would have their tuned frequency lowered. As written already, the speed of sound is dependent on temperature, not pressure.

In the range of studios locations, the difference is minimal. IF you have your heart set on it, look for some Thiele-Small calculators with option of entering air impedance and play around.

Altitudinaly gifted,
Andre
Old 23rd January 2013
  #10
Lives for gear
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Some electronics have a maximum altitude spec and I always assumed it had to do with the effect of air density on heat capacity / thermal conductivity for passive cooling.
Old 23rd January 2013
  #11
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
The Stereophile article about testing loudspeakers in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Under Pressure: Loudspeakers at Altitude
By John Atkinson β€’ Published: May 13, 1990

Under Pressure: Loudspeakers at Altitude | Stereophile.com
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