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Fabric for Acoustic panels-- Thickness,,please advise !
Old 4th June 2011
  #1
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🎧 10 years
Question Fabric for Acoustic panels-- Thickness,,please advise !

I found a very nice Fabric, but is strechy and tight .....is that matters? a fabric can affect the absortion of the Owen Corning if when you blow thru the fabric air does not go thru so easy?????
Old 4th June 2011
  #2
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToneRexx ➑️
I found a very nice Fabric, but is strechy and tight .....is that matters? a fabric can affect the absortion of the Owen Corning if when you blow thru the fabric air does not go thru?????
Any help?
Old 4th June 2011 | Show parent
  #3
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🎧 10 years
?? ????
Old 5th June 2011 | Show parent
  #4
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Nobody?
Old 5th June 2011 | Show parent
  #5
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ritelec's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Can air pass through it?
Does it look like it may rip when supporting or stapling?

If it looks strong enough to work with and you can blow through it, I would suggest to use it, But don't forget, I suk at this.
Old 5th June 2011
  #6
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToneRexx ➑️
I found a very nice Fabric, but is strechy and tight .....is that matters? a fabric can affect the absortion of the Owen Corning if when you blow thru the fabric air does not go thru so easy?????
First up, I hope I'm not being out of turn here.....

Second, your descriptions are not particularly clear. "Tight and stretchy"????? Cannot picture that myself.

Third, give people a chance mate! Two bumps in less than 3 hours! Three bumps in less than a day! People give their time freely on these forums to help folk like us. The least we can do is show a bit of restraint and patience.

Fourth - my take on your questions..... Yes, fabric does effect the passing of air and therefore sound waves. The higher frequencies in particular will be reflected more by less breathable fabrics. The oft given advice on forums is to hold the fabric to your mouth and try to breath/blow through it. If you can do that quite easily your fabric should be ok. Looking at your original post, you already know that anyway.

Whereabouts are you in this world of ours? Perhaps people could suggest some alternatives for you to look at. Also, what type of treatment are you planning to cover with this fabric - bass traps, first reflection panels, etc.?

And also, if the fabric is stretchy, does it become more breathable when stretched? Presumably the fabric will be stretched when used on the traps in order to get a nice finish...? SO it is in that state that you want to be testing it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ritelec ➑️
I suk at this.
I think you are supposed to blow through the fabric, not suck it!
Old 6th June 2011
  #7
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jhbrandt's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToneRexx ➑️
I found a very nice Fabric, but is strechy and tight .....is that matters? a fabric can affect the absortion of the Owen Corning if when you blow thru the fabric air does not go thru so easy?????
Tone,
As long as the fabric is not to tight a weave, it should be fine. You would be surprised how many fabrics can work. The problem with very shiny fabrics or tight weave fabrics is that they become reflective at high frequencies and at glancing angles, which is exactly what you don't want in an absorber. For example; many fabrics designed for fancy upholstery are not so good for absorption panels. -- Fortunately, it's the cheaper fabrics that work well.

cheers,
John
Old 6th June 2011 | Show parent
  #8
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🎧 10 years
Thanks! the fabric is a bit strech, and I can breath easy thru it and when I blow I feel the air one hand away... so I guess is that Ok?? is not as open as burlap,but I think is good...what do u think guys??? I think the name of that fabric is called "Tropical"
Old 6th June 2011 | Show parent
  #9
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musikmaschine's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Just Tropical? I'm looking for fabric right now. This sounds good for tight fit for frames and corners! I think hessian/jute is good also but the colours are a bit dull...
Old 6th June 2011 | Show parent
  #10
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🎧 10 years
the name is Tropical...I do not know if is called also different, but is good and found nice colors!



Quote:
Originally Posted by musikmaschine ➑️
Just Tropical? I'm looking for fabric right now. This sounds good for tight fit for frames and corners! I think hessian/jute is good also but the colours are a bit dull...
Old 7th June 2011 | Show parent
  #11
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musikmaschine's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToneRexx ➑️
the name is Tropical...I do not know if is called also different, but is good and found nice colors!
Thanks. Can't find anything called Tropical online. Do you have a link or anything? Maybe not available in my part of the world. I've come across some 'acoustic fabrics' but they are far too expensive.

Apparently GIK sell the camira fabric but you have to email them to get some.
Old 9th June 2011
  #12
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VDNorman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
We often have this question posed regarding our Frequency Response Panel system. Please find our partial reply below:

Fabric contenders will be similar to speaker grill cloth. Look for weights around 9-13oz. per linear yard and >65% polyester content. Primary use may say “for panels and upholstered walls”. Here are a few tests you can use to evaluate a custom fabric contender:
  • When holding the fabric in front of your eyes, you should be able to easily identify objects across the room.
  • When holding the fabric with a spread-fingered hand against your lips and blowing through it, you should be able to feel air passing by your fingers.
  • When pulling on the fabric, it should not exhibit any elasticity.
Acoustically, you need to find out how transparent it is to sound waves. Fabrics may be tested via air-flow resistivity or impedance tube depending on the function of the cloth i.e.; covering a speaker or covering an acoustic panel. Understand that just because a fabric is very porous, doesn't mean it is acoustically friendly. Each fabric will have a unique frequency absorption/reflection signature.


For installation, you need to determine values for rip, grab, sag and track hold. Fabrics will be tested for elasticity, retainer hold, tensile strength, tear strength, pattern alignments concerns, read-through concerns and light reflectivity concerns. Also, be aware of the Flame ******ant Rating, Cleaning Code, light-fastness, etc. when selecting.
Old 9th June 2011 | Show parent
  #13
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ritelec's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDNorman ➑️
[LIST][*]When holding the fabric in front of your eyes, you should be able to easily identify objects across the room.
Wow, I used T-shirt type material...............maybe that's why my room is so F*ed up.................
Old 9th June 2011 | Show parent
  #14
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musikmaschine's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDNorman ➑️
We often have this question posed regarding our Frequency Response Panel system. Please find our partial reply below:

Fabric contenders will be similar to speaker grill cloth. Look for weights around 9-13oz. per linear yard and >65% polyester content. Primary use may say β€œfor panels and upholstered walls”. Here are a few tests you can use to evaluate a custom fabric contender:
  • When holding the fabric in front of your eyes, you should be able to easily identify objects across the room.
  • When holding the fabric with a spread-fingered hand against your lips and blowing through it, you should be able to feel air passing by your fingers.
  • When pulling on the fabric, it should not exhibit any elasticity.
Acoustically, you need to find out how transparent it is to sound waves. Fabrics may be tested via air-flow resistivity or impedance tube depending on the function of the cloth i.e.; covering a speaker or covering an acoustic panel. Understand that just because a fabric is very porous, doesn't mean it is acoustically friendly. Each fabric will have a unique frequency absorption/reflection signature.


For installation, you need to determine values for rip, grab, sag and track hold. Fabrics will be tested for elasticity, retainer hold, tensile strength, tear strength, pattern alignments concerns, read-through concerns and light reflectivity concerns. Also, be aware of the Flame ******ant Rating, Cleaning Code, light-fastness, etc. when selecting.
So to summarise it would be wise to buy material designed for it rather than some burlap from a garden center? heh
Old 10th June 2011 | Show parent
  #15
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Starlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Burlap is fine. Garden center burlap may not have a fire rating. I bought burlap from a furniture store because it has a fire rating.
Old 5th July 2011 | Show parent
  #16
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Quint's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
What about bed sheets? Anybody ever used those before? To be clear though, I'm not talking about the super high thread count fancy stuff. I'm talking about the cheapo sheets you can get from Wal-mart for $10.
Old 5th July 2011 | Show parent
  #17
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Starlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
If the bed sheets are not fire rated I would look at something else. Whilst none of us ever exoect problems, you only need to have a fair chunk of wall and ceiling space covered in flammable material before you are risking a seriously out of control fire should one ever start.
Old 5th July 2011 | Show parent
  #18
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
what is stopping you from using the ETC to test a particular fabric for verification that it is not reflecting any energy to the listening position?

identify the boundary of the reflection via the ETC. place un-wrapped broad band absorption at the reflection point. verify attenuated via ETC. wrap panel in fabric and retest via ETC.

take the guess-work out of it.

further reading:
https://www.gearslutz.com/board/bass-...absorbers.html
Old 8th July 2011 | Show parent
  #19
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
I use ceiling tiles instead of fabric. To each his own. As long as whatever material you are using behind the fabric doesn't shed dust through you're golden.
Old 15th July 2011 | Show parent
  #20
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
If I were to purchase and use burlap that isn't Fire resistant and then sprayed the fabric with Firestop spray would this hinder sound to pass thru? Does firestop or similar sprays leave a film on the fabric?
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