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Dealing with AC?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #1
Dealing with AC?

Hey what's up

I am wondering if anyone has any advice about dealing with recording and the sound that the AC puts off

Ever since I began recording people at home I have had to turn the ac on real cold before the artist arrives, then shut it off while they record and run the fan in between takes to keep it cool if I need to. The AC unit is not particularly loud but I can definitely notice it.

I was seeing if there is anyway to run the ac but somehow not hear it in the room that I record in?? haha

Hopefully there is a way, if not the method I have now works

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated
Old 3 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Starlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
What type of AC are you using?, eg. ducted, multi-split.
Which AC (make and model) are you using?
How loud is your AC (in dB SPL)?
How loud is your AC on its quietest setting?
What ventilation supply and extraction do you have in your live room?
How many cubic metres of fresh air are you introducing per hour?
What temperature does your AC happily and quietly cool to?
What is the temperature outside?
What is the relative humidity level in your live room?
What climate does your house sit in?
Where in the world are you, approximately?
What dimensions (L, W, H) does you live room have?
What acoustic treatment is in your live room?
How far from the microphone is the AC?
If the mic facing the AC, the ceiling, the floor?
What mic(s) are you using?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Guru
 
thethrillfactor's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergstramental ➡️

I was seeing if there is anyway to run the ac but somehow not hear it in the room that I record in??
Is this a window AC, split system or central AC?

If the HVAC system is not designed with sound isolation in mind you are out of options.

I guess there is always buckets of Dry Ice?
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starlight ➡️
What type of AC are you using?, eg. ducted, multi-split.
Which AC (make and model) are you using?
How loud is your AC (in dB SPL)?
How loud is your AC on its quietest setting?
What ventilation supply and extraction do you have in your live room?
How many cubic metres of fresh air are you introducing per hour?
What temperature does your AC happily and quietly cool to?
What is the temperature outside?
What is the relative humidity level in your live room?
What climate does your house sit in?
Where in the world are you, approximately?
What dimensions (L, W, H) does you live room have?
What acoustic treatment is in your live room?
How far from the microphone is the AC?
If the mic facing the AC, the ceiling, the floor?
What mic(s) are you using?
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor ➡️
Is this a window AC, split system or central AC?

If the HVAC system is not designed with sound isolation in mind you are out of options.

I guess there is always buckets of Dry Ice?
Hey sorry for the late response

The room is 13'7" x 11'8" x 8'

I've got Two Bass traps in the corners behind my monitors that cover the corners from floor to ceiling filled with roxul insulation.
I've got 9 sound panels on the walls of the same material that are about 2' x 4' spaced out best I can.

It's a central AC, the brand is Allied I believe.

There's only one vent in the room and based on the setup of the room its relatively close to the Mic so this probably needs to be changed.

Main Vocal Mic is a Rode NT-1A.
Also use a sm58 for things.

Its going to get hot this summer down here in Florida, 90-100 degrees fahrenheit on hot days. And its going to be pretty humid as well. AC works good and can keep the temp easily aroun70-72 but I havent really tried to go much colder yet.

Hopefully this info helps, I know it's not entirely comprehensive but just looking to see if there may be some suggestions

Thanks
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 15 years
I've got a new studio that's a fairly good size space, and tall ceiling. I went for a mini-split, and had them mount it up fairly high on the gable wall. It's only about 6"-8" from the ceiling. The unit has a "quiet" setting, which is actually pretty quiet, and the unit generally stays in that quiet mode anyway. It's only if I have it off for some reason, or if there's a sudden rise in temps that it will kick on high for a minute or so, and then it again drops to the quiet mode.

Since this is a new studio...I have yet to get to actual tracking, and that will happen in then next few weeks, so it will be during the middle of the summer and the AC will be running, so I'll see how much of an issue it is, though I think for a lot of stuff that will have a fairly hot signal, that "quiet" mode won't be an issue. I may end up shutting it off altogether for things like vocals or when I track the grand piano...which is right below where the mini-split is.

That said...I also installed two very large ceiling fans...so I can run them on their slowest mode, and they move a lot of air without making any noise...they have some kind of interesting turbo blade design.
The other thing for me is that the studio was built with heavier insulation and thicker drywall...plus, it sits on a slab. So even on warm days, you walk in there and it feels pretty cool...though I'm sure when a good of the audio gear is power up, it will warm up the room, so the AC will come on as needed.

So maybe add a ceiling fan...that way you don't need to go from freezing the room before people come, to being hot after they arrive.
Of course...a small room will heat up pretty quickly...but then, it can also be cooled off quickly too...so you just have to work in-between all that.

Try also putting a baffle of some type several inches from the vent...maybe even just a thick piece of foam or similar. That mighty help block that "air noise" but still allow you to let the AC run.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Starlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I looked at the technical specs of Allied ACs and they appear to be noisy, the quietest model emits 66dB. Most studios that get discussed here use ACs that emit under 20dB in the quietest (slowest) mode. That will be why you are having to turn it off when recording.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by miroslav ➡️
So maybe add a ceiling fan...that way you don't need to go from freezing the room before people come, to being hot after they arrive.
Of course...a small room will heat up pretty quickly...but then, it can also be cooled off quickly too...so you just have to work in-between all that.

Try also putting a baffle of some type several inches from the vent...maybe even just a thick piece of foam or similar. That mighty help block that "air noise" but still allow you to let the AC run.
Ok hell yea I will definitely try something like this. Thanks a lot

Quote:
Originally Posted by Starlight ➡️
I looked at the technical specs of Allied ACs and they appear to be noisy, the quietest model emits 66dB. Most studios that get discussed here use ACs that emit under 20dB in the quietest (slowest) mode. That will be why you are having to turn it off when recording.
Wow that's crazy haha. Makes sense. The builders of this building were definitely not designing a recording space
Good to know, thanks for looking into it
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