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Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers
Old 1st March 2021
  #1
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers

Hey everyone!

Tomorrow I'm receiving the first documents from a company that will design and build my home recording studio. I'm excited!

They've build studios for famous musicians here in France, and while I should be in good hands already, I thought I'd share with you guys my journey and ask you guys for advices/opinions at the same time.

While it's good to have professionals to work on the studio build, I love the idea to talk about the process with other musicians and people who surely know better than me about acoustics and home studios.
At the same time, I hope the thread will be interesting for the community and help anybody who might have the same doubts/issues in the future.

Here's what I can tell you so far about the (future) studio and - hopefully - the questions/doubts that you can help me with.

(See attached images, side view and from the top).

- Final size will probably be around 36-37 square meters, which should be enough to compose, record guitars, vocals and drums, bass, an upright piano, and additional acoustic instruments if/when needed. (I'll mainly do orchestral/cinematic and rock/blues).

- The main concern is that I want light, lots of natural light, but the only source of sunlight I can have is to have large sliding glass doors to enter the studio (with 2 soundproof thick glass with anti-shock and sound reduction properties, which should be enough to slow down thieves (but anyway the access is from my garden, so it should be ok) and soundproof.

- Will these 2 large glass doors be enough for soundproofing? There'll be a 1,6ft air gap between them, the exterior glass door will be 2 layers of glass (8mm the first, 5 mm the second, with 12mm of air gap in between) - The second glass door will have a 4mm + 4mm double glazing.
The 2 glass doors will have a 0,9ft of air space between them (to be able to open/close glass doors, but also to enhance acoustic soundproofing.

Will this be ok? My goal: if I happen to record a rock band, I don't want to be heard by heighbours or family if they're in the adjacent garden.
If they hear me "a little bit" it's ok, some bass frequencies will leak anyway, but "just a bit" is my goal. I want to be able to compose/record at night if needed.
There's a building adjacent at the left of my future studio.

Floor: will be suspended - the company will create a suspended floor 25 cm from ground (around 9.8 inches) on sylomers which will attenuate vibrations.

Roof: 2 layers of steel with one 8cm layer of polyurethane in between.
Soundproofing underneath the roof = around 50cm of rockwool (I guess, the company didn't disclose full documents yet, they'll be coming soon).

So, the concept is the classic one of the "room within the room" with suspended ceiling and floor.

The only "less traditional" approach is the audio monitors facing 2 large glass doors layered to sound proof and allow light at once.

The glass doors will be around 9.1ft large x 6.8 tall.

The walls will be covered with a mix of soundproofing material, absorbers and all covered by fabric. There'll be then other details such as diffusors/cloud added.

Another goal/struggle (?) will be to have all different acoustic comforts and needs in one single space (the mixing/listening position area; the area to record drums, the area to record guitars/bass, the area to record piano.

The company said will take care of it while planning the studio design.
Of of the engineers told me they'll probably aim to have a general 0.5 seconds Reverberation time in the whole room.

I'll also post below in a second post my initial design/sketch of how I'd probably distribute elements in the studio, but it's all temporary and can be modified - except maybe the fact to have the desktop facing the glass doors (I love/need/want to look at the garden while working and get sunlight - will use curtains or something to block light when needed.

Any advices, obesrvations, criticism will be highly appreciated!!

Thank you all in advance! I'm, quite excited to start this journey!
Attached Thumbnails
Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-studio-sketch-1.jpg   Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-studio-sketch-2.jpg  
Old 1st March 2021
  #2
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Here's a few 3d and 2d sketches of a design idea I had in mind (more a space organization than a design) as well as a couple of pictures of the current (very RAW) state of the garage to be split in 2 and converted in a home studio (bigger part) and garage (smaller part).

PS: so far this is all done by me - while waiting for the company to deliver the definitive studies.
Attached Thumbnails
Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-schermata-2021-03-01-alle-22.17.01.jpg   Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-schermata-2021-03-01-alle-22.16.52.jpg   Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-schermata-2021-03-01-alle-22.16.24.jpg   Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-schermata-2021-03-01-alle-22.15.02.png   Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-schermata-2021-03-01-alle-22.14.48.png  

Old 1st March 2021
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
I don't have any expert advice to share, only wishes of encouragement as I know you must be pretty anxious. As you wait, it seems some of that anxiety is taking the form of doubt. It is why you hire professionals though.

I don't how it works in the world of acousticians but what is that old saying, ask 6 audio engineer's for opinions and you'll get 9 different ones. With everything, expect compromises and limitations.

Wish you the best of luck and will look forward to updates. I'm sure you are very excited about getting this started.
Old 1st March 2021 | Show parent
  #4
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MajorNoteStudio ➡️
ask 6 audio engineer's for opinions and you'll get 9 different ones. With everything, expect compromises and limitations.
That's all very true! Thanks for the words of encouragement!
I'd say there's at least 30% of anxiety, due to the money invested in it
But the other 70% is joy/excitement!


I'll be able to post updates tomorrow, anyway will check here daily as the joy of the building process is greater if I can share it with people who like the same stuff: music and studios!
Old 8th March 2021
  #5
So you're working with professionals but are unsure if the windows/doors block enough sound? I don't get it.

On another note, if you want to mix in that room, you'll need more treatment than the few placebo squares you have in your renderings.
Old 9th March 2021
  #6
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🎧 10 years
Would you have an overview/plan with acoustics treatment?
Old 9th March 2021
  #7
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Great space! How wide are the endpieces beside the window? Are there thin moitors that you of to flush mount in the corners? Have you considered having the mixer etc on a turnatble so you face the musicians when recording?
Old 9th March 2021
  #8
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🎧 10 years
Hello,

Quote:
Roof: 2 layers of steel with one 8cm layer of polyurethane in between.
Soundproofing underneath the roof = around 50cm of rockwool (I guess, the company didn't disclose full documents yet, they'll be coming soon).
If you can put 500mm of rockwool, that means you have some space...that means you don't have to use steel (expensive) and could have at least same performance for less cheap using basic materials.

Polyurethane is used as thermal barrier, very efficient during winter. Not at all during summer, it's called "déphasage" in France.
It's a very poor soundproofing barrier. If your two masses are connected with polyurethane, the whole "room within a room design" is compromised...and very poor soundproofing.

Plus, having 500mm of rockwool after the soundproofing barrier won't help a lot, and will be part of you acoustic treatment, not soundproofing.


Quote:
- Will these 2 large glass doors be enough for soundproofing?
Company should (and have to) calculate TL you get with this design. And you'll get your answer.

Quote:
Of of the engineers told me they'll probably aim to have a general 0.5 seconds Reverberation time in the whole room.
0,5 sec is a lot in CR, specially this size.
But RTx is not the right tool to use in such acoustic spaces.

I'd ask for a very tight decay around listening position...for your recording space up to task. Up to project.

Looking forward to see more about this project!
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #9
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by johannburkard ➡️
So you're working with professionals but are unsure if the windows/doors block enough sound? I don't get it.

On another note, if you want to mix in that room, you'll need more treatment than the few placebo squares you have in your renderings.
Fair enough, I don't think I was clear 100%. Those renderings are just my personal renderings that I did even before getting in touch with the company in charge to build the studio. I did those just to share with them my initial thoughts. The real acoustic treatment will be done after measurements, using a combination of diffusors and absorbers all hidden by textile, and in some parts there'll be wood exposed to diffuse.

Regarding the windows, I had doubts because, being quite "ignorant" on acoustics concepts, I assumed glass is not good enough to isolate acoustically.

Then I was informed that there'll be two bay windows, with an air gap of around 30cm.

1st bay window made of 2 glasses of different thickness, and with 12mm of air gap in between. The outer glass is double glazed made by two layers of glass and a plastic sheet in between.

2nd bay window will be 1 double glazed window, but thicker.

This combination of different thickness and air gaps should be enough to achieve proper acoustic insulation (together with the acoustic insulation on the other walls and ceiling and floor, of course.)
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #10
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🎧 5 years
I'm not allowed to publicly share the full exact plans done by the company, as I want to respect their IP. But I'll surely share some details, what can be shared in fairness, along the way.
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #11
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare ➡️
Great space! How wide are the endpieces beside the window? Are there thin moitors that you of to flush mount in the corners? Have you considered having the mixer etc on a turnatble so you face the musicians when recording?
Thanks a lot avare!

There'll be two walls of 25 inches on the left and right side of the bay windows.
They'll be used to allow enough space to build the room in the room, bass traps and other acoustic treatment.

The mixing position is an interesting idea, but to be honest 90% of the work I'll be doing is film/tv scoring, so what I need the most is a good listening/producing/mixing position facing the bay window (light = mood improvement + inspiration for me!) and at the back of me a good tracking space where to record all the instruments that I won't use VSTs instruments for (guitars, drums, piano, vocals and a few others).

Occasionally I'll have to track small chamber sections (violin, viola, cello....) where I'll probably look for a very dry sound to edit with added reverb later, as having a realistic hall reverb in this space is impossible.

But for drums, it would be great to have a nice sounding room for tracking overheads in the proper way. Perhaps with the help of good sounding treatment.....The ceiling is higher in that part of the room where I'll have drums, as the roof has a 7% slope. So that'll be around 10-11 ft. over the drums.

Not sure about the monitors...did you mean monitos wall mounted at the 2 sides? The listening position/sweet spot will probably be 2-3 meters away from the windows, facing them, and I don't know if I can have that good triangle configuration with monitors correctly placed in the corners? I have no clue, perhaps it's 100% doable?
Anyway for now the plan is to have nearfield and midfield monitors placed close to the desktop, placed on stands. Unless the acoustician will advise differently. Open to suggestions!

Regarding monitors....do you guys think that for this kind of space I'd better start looking for a midfield pair of monitors? I'm concerned that for this size a nearfield would offer a too narrow sweet spot?
Thanks again for all the feedback avare!
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #12
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🎧 5 years
Thanks Jaypee! Very detailed reply, I appreciate.

Regarding the roof in polyutherane, that's just the roof, I'm not sure what you mean, but there'll be acoustic treatment all in between the room-in-the-room and the roof. The roof will be a "sandwich" of 2 layers of steel with polyutherane in between. But that's only to have a roof, without any acoustic property if not a minor one. I was told that together with the acoustic treatment it will provide enough thermic isolation both in winter and summer....I hope?

Under the roof there are 17cm thick of wooden beams supporting the roof. These 17cm will be empty, to allow for air flow and help avoiding any condensation as result of the outside cold air/inside warmer temperature.

Underneath, directly attached to the wooden beams, there'll be a total of around 32 cm (not 500mm, edit) of different layers:

2 layers of drywall with waterproof qualities (in case of extreme temperature differences between outside and inside, if condensation will not be avoided by the polyutherane and the air gap - which should never happen anyway).

25 cm of rockwool and air gap (not sure in which exact configuration, I've not been told).

Another 3 layers of drywall to add solid mass.

That's of course only for the suspended ceiling.

Regarding RT, thanks for sharing your info. I didn't receive definitive acoustic studies done by the company. They could maybe propose a different RT from the initial one. I don't know.

What do you think it could be a good RT in one room used for basically very different tasks? I guess when I'm mixing I need a much more controlled sound that when I'm tracking.

Not to mention that I often produce orchestral music, but I do track rock guitars and drums, but some other times I'll need to record a cello or a piano, so....I guess I'll have to find a good compromise?

Perhaps I'd have to ask for some acoustic treatment with diffusors/panels that can be moved around one or more walls? Lookinf for a simple solution that won't make the budget skyrocket to abbey road levels though :D :D

I'll ask them about the short decay around the sweet spot. I guess we're talking about a less lively, more dampned "dead" sound with more absorption?
I hope my language makes sense, I'm not at all an expert of acoutics, hence my topic here to collect knowledge and share with you my journey!
Old 9th March 2021
  #13
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
What are you calling nearfields?

With the acoustic centres1 foot in on each the centres are 10 feet apart and the point would be 8 feet 8 inches 2.62 m distant. Right in the range you wrote.

The EBU RT is .25 s for a 3500 ft³ room. One option is panels that can be hinged and open to more absorptio. Considerably cheaper than Schroeder type diffusers are polys.
Old 9th March 2021
  #14
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🎧 5 years
1st UPDATE!! - Frontal View (My sketch) not in scale (SEE IMAGE)

Hey, thanks all for your replies! Here's attached a sketch I did of the initial plans regarding the sound isolation and first structural plan.

There'll be a suspended ceiling, and a floating floor, and of course a box-in-the-box structure.

The floating floor will be floating over sound-resilient plots to isolate sound waves. There's a few different layers between the roof and the final internal ceiling of the studio, to insure not only soundproofing but also avoid condensation as result between indoor/outdoow temperature differences.

A total of 5 layers of dry wall (each one 13mm thick) + 25cm of rockwool/air gap should allow, together with the initial roof, for the sound insulation.
(see image). That should be enough mass and layers to isolate the roof?

Working on the design and sound treatment, cable management, electric heating, air conducts....will post more in the future.

The wall opposite to the bay windows will have a double door (acoustic door + normal wall) to access to a garage, which then has access to the road.).

Besides the soundproof properties of the acoustic door, the other door had anyway additional 40 dB of sound reduction properties, which combined together should be enough (door-wise) to soundproof. Of course then there'll be walls soundproofing.

Don't know much yet about the walls soundproofing, except that there'll be a combination of rockwool and textile which will serve as well as sound treatment, plus wood elements and other panels (to be discussed with the company after they do proper study/measurements).

Let me know what you think so far! Thanks again for all the feedback!
Attached Thumbnails
Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-studio-first-sketch-study-frontal-view-layers.jpg  
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #15
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare ➡️
What are you calling nearfields?

With the acoustic centres1 foot in on each the centres are 10 feet apart and the point would be 8 feet 8 inches 2.62 m distant. Right in the range you wrote.

The EBU RT is .25 s for a 3500 ft³ room. One option is panels that can be hinged and open to more absorptio. Considerably cheaper than Schroeder type diffusers are polys.
Sorry avare, I'm trying to digest at the same time acoustic concepts, english and meters to feet conversion Please bear with me if I look confused/ignorant on the matter!

Are you saying it would be doable to install midfield monitors in the corners at the L and R of the window, and have them work well for a sweet spot that's around 2,6meters distant from the window? If that's so, it's interesting. Would that work with midfield, or bigger monitors would be required? Are we talking about having them embedded right into the bass traps/treatment in the corners of the room at the sides of the window?

Regarding nearfield, I call them a pair of Adam A7X that I'm used to work with.
But I'm contemplating, when money will allow (this studio build will suck my funds) to perhaps invest in midfield monitors like for instance a pair of Adam S3H or Neumann KH 310, which should be able to better fill the room with a more tridimensional sound, and, above all, a larger sweet spot. I guess for a room of such final dimensions nearfield are better than nearfield?

Regarding the EBU RT, I don't know what the full acronym stands for. Do you mean that an untreated room of those dimentions will naturally have around 0.25 RT ? If so, based on your expertise, what would be an advisable general RT time to achieve in the whole room? Is there such a thing as different RT achievable in one room based on the position in the room? And what would be preferable to have in the mixing position / guitar/drums/tracking positions?

Sorry for all the very "noob" questions, very keen to learn, but as you can imagine I'm really new to all this! Thanks again for your patience!
Old 9th March 2021
  #16
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Thank you for the drawing. That is a triple leaf in the ceiling. Flip the lowest srywall and the rockwool. Not a recommendation just doing a wuick check and Genelec 1238a, 1238ac, 1234b and 1234bc all fit in the sides. Of smaller ones do also of course.

Why is the floor being floated? Has a noise survey been done? I am under the impression that there already has slab on grade floor..
Old 9th March 2021
  #17
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Your english is fine. 2.6 m away ffrom the monitors is they would be aimed..

EBU is the European Broadcat Union and I was was referring to EBU tech 3276 (attached). Amongst other things defines a target reverb time.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf EBU tech 3276.pdf (53.3 KB, 50 views)
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #18
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare ➡️
Thank you for the drawing. That is a triple leaf in the ceiling. Flip the lowest srywall and the rockwool. Not a recommendation just doing a wuick check and Genelec 1238a, 1238ac, 1234b and 1234bc all fit in the sides. Of smaller ones do also of course.

Why is the floor being floated? Has a noise survey been done? I am under the impression that there already has slab on grade floor..
Thanks to you for the continuous feedback!
You mean drywall numbered 3 on the drawing should be exchanged wit hthe rockwool layer?

Thanks for the recommendation, I'll ask them about this idea of monitors placement in the corners at L and R of the bay windows.

The floating floor was recommended after the first visit to the place. The guy entered an apartment of the neighboor living in the building at the left of my future studio, and measured the silence noise. Did the same measurements outside my studio and then blasted pink noise (i beleive it was?) inside the future studio.

The results told him that floating floor is necessary to build a real room-in-a-room that will refrain sound to reach the outside and the adjacent building.

He said what could cause problem, if I don't build a floating floor, is especially the impact sound (like for example the kick drum of the drums, or a subwoofer, or low frequencies). I guess while not 100% necessary, a floating floor would really help the sound not to travel from floor to the outer walls of the structure?

Currently the floor of the raw structure of the actual garage is just concrete going directly in the ground. This concrete foundations were done by the precedent owner of the house. He said the foundations are not touching directly those of the adjacent building, which I guess it's good regarding isolation.
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #19
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare ➡️
Your english is fine. 2.6 m away ffrom the monitors is they would be aimed..

EBU is the European Broadcat Union and I was was referring to EBU tech 3276 (attached). Amongst other things defines a target reverb time.
Thanks a lot! I'll dig into it and try to understand as much as I can :D
Old 9th March 2021
  #20
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I meant all three at the bottom of the ceiling be should above the rockwool and airgap. IOW allfive layers of drywall should be togother

I can not be definiitive without seeing the SPL levels, I am suspicous of the floating floor..

Last edited by avare; 9th March 2021 at 12:19 PM.. Reason: Revised first paragraph
Old 9th March 2021
  #21
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🎧 10 years
Avare, I might be wrong, but the two steel plates between the polyurethane, plus the air gap, then the drywall (2 layers) , then the rockwool, then the final layers of drywalls (3 layers) I count 4 distinct masses, separated by polyurethane, air gap and rockwool. So a quadruple leaf system? Or maybe the two steels plus polyurethane can be considered as one and only one mass? But I doubt about it.
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #22
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPee ➡️
Avare, I might be wrong, but the two steel plates between the polyurethane, plus the air gap, then the drywall (2 layers) , then the rockwool, then the final layers of drywalls (3 layers) I count 4 distinct masses, separated by polyurethane, air gap and rockwool. So a quadruple leaf system? Or maybe the two steels plus polyurethane can be considered as one and only one mass? But I doubt about it.
Just to make sure I didn't create any confusion with mentioning the steel, what I was talking about is the mere structure of the roof, which is a 80mm roof made as a sandwich, where the top and bottom are made of thin steel, and in between there's a polyurethane of 80mm. This is just to have a decent roof with thermic properties, and it was NOT chosen during the acoustic isolation/treatment phase.

The roof will be built using blocks similar to the one attached below, where the white part corresponds to the polyurethane.
Attached Thumbnails
Home Studio Build: Sharing my step by step build done by Professional Acoustic Engineers-schermata-2021-03-09-alle-14.08.06.png  
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #23
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPee ➡️
Avare, I might be wrong, but the two steel plates between the polyurethane, plus the air gap, then the drywall (2 layers) , then the rockwool, then the final layers of drywalls (3 layers) I count 4 distinct masses, separated by polyurethane, air gap and rockwool. So a quadruple leaf system? Or maybe the two steels plus polyurethane can be considered as one and only one mass? But I doubt about it.
You could also be right. I have never seen any studies on the TL of such composites. I am assuming that the polyurethane is stiff enough to couple the steel plates. When I think of the SSPUs I worked with, they all coupled the surfaces they were contained in.
Old 9th March 2021
  #24
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Thank you for your answer.

I think OP is safe by putting all drywall layers together as you suggested.
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #25
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPee ➡️
Or maybe the two steels plus polyurethane can be considered as one and only one mass? But I doubt about it.
I found something close enough for our purposes! The test sample uses lightweight foam instead of PU, so the coupling and damping of the Fmam is less than the OP's case. The experimental results shown in figure 3.8 on page 64 of Cowan. No Fmam dip.
Attached Files
Old 9th March 2021
  #26
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🎧 10 years
Gearslutz at its best, thanks Avare!
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #27
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🎧 5 years
Wow, thanks a lot for digging so deep into this! I'm frankly overwhelmed by the amount of details, and also a bit confused regarding the 3 or 4 leaf system.

The layering of these materials (2 drywall, then rockwool and air gap, then 3 other drywalls) have been decided by the company who's going to build the studio.

So if I understand well, you guys suggest instead to put the rockwool at the bottom all the rest, and to put 5 drywall layers together before the rockwool, so to have instead a 2 leaf configuration?

double leaf is better than triple or quadruple?

Should I be worried if this company proposes instead their configuration (as in the picture I shared) or is it anyway acceptable, or maybe the fact that these layers have all different thickness will make this configuration good acoustics-wise?

I'm confused/worried :D
Old 9th March 2021
  #28
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Forget the 3 or 4 leaf question. It has been determined that it is 3 leafs. We have barely touched all the details involved.

I do not know enough about the details in the decision making process. I already expresed my concern about the floating floor. I do not even know what is planned for the sound isolation of the walls. I do not know even the results of the noise survey.

You have chosen to go with a company that has at least some proprietary design work. We can do little without knowledge.

I can not see it being proprietary for a hmoe studio design build, so what is their plan for HVAC?

We have discussed the window. What are acoustic plans for the door?
Old 9th March 2021 | Show parent
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankDandrea ➡️
Regarding monitors....do you guys think that for this kind of space I'd better start looking for a midfield pair of monitors? I'm concerned that for this size a nearfield would offer a too narrow sweet spot?
Maybe not narrow at the desk but probably at the couch, yes. Similar to what @ avare recommended, I'd take a look at the Genelec S360. Wide directivity with probably a lot of power (heard them shortly at the München Hi-End messe). Genelec 8350 may be enough, too.

BTW: I'd also figure out if you're a "midfield" guy or not. I inched forward in my music room from 1,50 m to the speakers to less than 1,40 and that's still too much for my taste. In your shoes, I'd maybe have two sets of speakers, one for guests.
Old 10th March 2021 | Show parent
  #30
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by avare ➡️
Forget the 3 or 4 leaf question. It has been determined that it is 3 leafs. We have barely touched all the details involved.

I do not know enough about the details in the decision making process. I already expresed my concern about the floating floor. I do not even know what is planned for the sound isolation of the walls. I do not know even the results of the noise survey.

You have chosen to go with a company that has at least some proprietary design work. We can do little without knowledge.

I can not see it being proprietary for a hmoe studio design build, so what is their plan for HVAC?

We have discussed the window. What are acoustic plans for the door?
I'll share what I know so far, which is the first measurements the company did on their first visit of the place that will be converted into a studio.
Here's a partial translation of some of the results (sorry but I'll have to use google translator since their document was issued in french.
Trying to include all relevant details - hope the lenght of this post will be acceptable

INITIAL STUDY AND MEASUREMENTS:

The measurements were carried out with the following equipment:
Sonometer XL2; NTi measurement microphone - model M4260,
JBL IRX 112 speaker diffusing pink noise at 112 dB (A).
The site plan gives an overview of the measurement locations and the future
studio. Two emergency measurements were carried out. A first in the garage
to the right of the future studio (figure 2), a second in the apartment on the ground floor of the building
adjoining (figure 3).





The source was placed in the future studio. The most problematic emergence is that
present in the apartment on the ground floor of the adjoining building. Indeed the garage on the other side
is subjected to a greater residual noise, the emergence is therefore lower.
Beyond the nuisances that the future studio can cause to neighbors, weaknesses are
Also to note about the isolation of the studio from the outside. The entire roof
in jail will inevitably pose a problem in the event of rain or noise from the street (car,
work, etc.). By modeling a heavy rain situation, a theoretical level of 57 dB (A)
would be reached in the garage (complete calculation sheet available in the appendix). Reinforcement
is therefore to be expected regarding the sound insulation of the roof.

With regard to the frequencies involved (very low in the spectrum), a total decoupling as well as a
Complete sealing of the studio is required. The implementation of a box within a box
placed on anti-vibration mounts is therefore recommended. This should be made up of partitions
dry, placed on a new acoustic slab, and supporting a self-supporting ceiling. Without this
insulation in the future state cannot be guaranteed.
The theoretical weakening provided by the box would be, depending on the composition of the news
walls (to be defined during the in-depth acoustic study), from 30 to 40 dB. In addition, a first
ceiling fixed to the current beams must be installed in order to limit sound transmissions
during heavy rains. These arrangements would allow us to work serenely in the future.
studio. The following figures show, in plan and section view, the solutions considered. He
The length of the box was between 8 and 10 meters. After various calculations, we
let us retain an interior length of 9.35 meters to optimize as much as possible the distribution of
eigen modes between 0 and 100 Hz.





Project Goal:

Whatever soundproofing is in place, when two rooms are adjoining, one
performance limit exists. Depending on the materials used and the space that
separate studio from neighbors, maximum listening or playing levels may vary. For
For example, figures 1 and 2 show the typical levels reached for different situations in
a studio. A jazz trio (bass - drums - saxophone) playing a ballad, a group of
hard-rock (guitar - bass - drums) playing at an overall level of 115 dB (Z) and a piano at
tail playing “loud” to give the following curves in dB (Z) and dB (A).





The dB (Z) curves represent the “real” pressure levels measured while the
dB (A) curves take into account a weighting in accordance with human hearing.
In the case of the present studio, levels similar to a hard rock band can be
achieved if a drum kit is played at the same time as a bass or an amplified guitar. The noise
rose emitted during on-site measurements also had an overall level of 115 dB (Z) and can
therefore be assimilated to the strongest level of play that can be achieved in the studio.
For a box in the complete box placed on studs, the attenuation could reach
40 dB (at 50 Hz) in the case where an air space of at least 13 cm is placed between the existing one
and the new dry wall (triple skin BA13). Emergence reaching almost 40 dB could
thus to be canceled and the repetition of a group would therefore be possible.

Results:

In view of the sound levels measured in the premises adjoining the future studio, it is
mandatory to create an overall acoustic seal. Without this, sound insulation cannot
take place.
In addition to the box the current state of the roof leads to the installation of a first lining

first. A slab separated from the existing one is also mandatory to cancel the trans-
solidarity missions.

The estimate associated with this report gives a first overview of the various costs generated
by installing insulating walls, then by acoustic treatment and fittings
global.





I hope this is helpful to understand what are the initial constraints of the structure compared to my needs, and perhaps now it will all make more sense? I'll try to share more info as I have it.

Does this all explain / justify their choice to create a floating floor over the current concrete floor? It appears the main reason is the need to properly isolate any impact sound (drums, bass frequencies) from traveling to the walls and therefore to the adjacent building.

Same question regarding the configuration of the plaster wall layers and their configuration in the making of the suspended ceiling etc...

If any of this is not clear, please let me know and I'll translate manually any part that google translator might have translated in a wrong way!

PS:

The garage walls are made of cinder blocks. There'll be a wall of the same material built as a separation wall between the future studio, and the portion of the garage that will remain a garage.

There'll be a double door in that wall to access the garage (one acoustic door with around 42 dB attenuation + another security door on the outer side, also with quite good soundproof properties.

I don't know yet the materials used to soundproof the walls.

Regarding the floating floor

Materials used will be (if my translations from french are correct):

Dry floating slab composed of
rock wool, 2 x 22mm, 1MAD4 and 2BA13.

Sylomers
Supply and installation of Massisol type sylomer blocks on wedges
in wood for leveling and installation of
cables under the floating slab.

That's all for now, updates coming asap!

Let me know what you guys think!
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