Quantcast
Advanced Key Signatures - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Advanced Key Signatures
Old 10th March 2014
  #1
Here for the gear
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
Advanced Key Signatures

Think you know all there is to know about your key signatures? Ready to take it a step further? Well check out this vid!

Old 10th March 2014
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Carnalia Barcus's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
Just note that if you're in a situation where you need to hand out parts and there's any kind of time and/or budget limit, even something as simple as a key signature with just a G# marked is probably not a good idea. As frustrating as it is, it's typically better to write it "in C" and simply mark all the Gs sharp as accidentals. (And trust me, I know this all too well from experience.)

Anyway, don't forget that you can do double-sharps, double-flats, quarter-tones, etc. in key signatures, too.

Now if we could just figure out a practical way to notate multi-octave key signatures, you know so that say B is flat and G is sharp in octave 1, 3, 5 etc. but only D and E are flat and F is sharp in octave 2, 4, 6, etc.
Old 10th March 2014
  #3
Here for the gear
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
Very well said. I think it's of course a matter of getting used to it. When you start learning music, and you have a key signature, I know teachers will have their students write the sharps before every note that is sharped by the key signature anyway, so they don't forget. Over time, the student doesn't need to do this though. I believe it'd be the same learning curve if you had just a G#, or a Bb and a C#, or 5 separate accidentals.

What would happen if you're in an orchestra, and you get handed new music that has an F# (G major, for example). You should be expected to play that without a second glance, right? Maybe some time that can happen with the extended key signatures too. After all, the key signature is presented EVERY line. :P It's hard to miss.

Also, I'm blown away by the multi-octave scale idea. I've thought this previously, but have never seen anyone bring it up. It's cool to see this idea elsewhere.

Or, what if your scale was an octave and a half long, but had a unique pattern as to make it seem like it was switching up every reiteration?

Anyway, awesome response. Loved it.
Old 10th March 2014 | Show parent
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Carnalia Barcus's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenjacks โžก๏ธ
Maybe some time that can happen with the extended key signatures too. After all, the key signature is presented EVERY line. :P It's hard to miss.
Yeah, definitely that would be nice. But I just know from experience that when you've got, say, a five piece horn section coming in cold on a session, and each guy is getting a couple hundred bucks per hour, when you hand them their parts and you've got it written in A harmonic minor (just G# as a time signature), you're more than likely going to end up with cacks that cost you time and money as you redo them (and as guys get frustrated etc.), whereas if you wrote it in C and just marked all of the Gs as sharp there's a significant chance they could nail it right off the bat.

I know it seems like that shouldn't be the case with pros, but it is. Pros are pros because if you hand them the same thing in C with the Gs marked as accidentals, there's a good chance they could nail the part right off the bat, and you might have time for four good takes on a couple different tunes all while getting them in and out in a couple hours for a couple thousand bucks (you might as well use them for a couple hours because unions have minimums that you're going to pay anyway). With amateurs, it's very unlikely they'd be able to come in and sightread stuff while getting all of the notes right, playing with good feel, etc., whether you write it in C with the Gs as accidentals or not.

Folks have to get used to seeing and thinking of keys in these different ways, but in a lot of pro situations, you have zero time to work with people or for them to get used to it. A lot of the trick of part preparation is learning how to "dummy-proof" the parts as much as possible. And there are certain things you might otherwise consider doing that are best avoided altogether--like handing folks something in 21/16 if you have limited time/money and you don't know if they've ever done much in odd times before.
Old 11th March 2014
  #5
Here for the gear
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
I agree entirely. I'm saying that if we were to redo the way musicians are taught, and teach them this concept from the start, in perhaps a generation (or 5), this would be a normal thing and new-age pros would wonder why you have to keep writing the G#'s in the music rather than 'using the a harmonic minor key sig like a normal person'.
๐Ÿ“ Reply
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump