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RadioShack 4-Channel Stereo Microphone Mixer: Phantom Power?
Old 10th March 2014
  #1
Gear Head
 
🎧 5 years
RadioShack 4-Channel Stereo Microphone Mixer: Phantom Power?

RadioShack 4-Channel Stereo Microphone Mixer: Phantom Power?

Does the RadioShack 4-Channel Stereo Microphone Mixer have phantom power?
Old 11th March 2014
  #2
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Rob Coates's Avatar
 
19 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
No, and why would you want that. Anything off of eBay for $35 to $40 would be better. Behringer would even be better.
Old 11th March 2014
  #3
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kennybro's Avatar
 
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🎧 10 years
Radio Shack's corporate mission statement is to make the crappiest stuff on the planet.
The one thing they do really well is honor their mission statement.

To answer your question, I see nothing about phantom in the specs. It's powered by one 9V battery, so phantom would make the battery last about 5 minutes. No.
Old 11th March 2014 | Show parent
  #4
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Rick Sutton's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro ➡️
Radio Shack's corporate mission statement is to make the crappiest stuff on the planet.
The one thing they do really well is honor their mission statement.
SO TRUE!!!!
Old 11th March 2014 | Show parent
  #5
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theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by bachfantasia ➡️
RadioShack 4-Channel Stereo Microphone Mixer: Phantom Power?

Does the RadioShack 4-Channel Stereo Microphone Mixer have phantom power?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Coates ➡️
No, and why would you want that. Anything off of eBay for $35 to $40 would be better. Behringer would even be better.
Pretty much.

I actually HAD one of those (or very similar) as part of my 'studio in a bag' that I put together to lend to friends and others for pre-studio practice before going into a 'real' studio with them the first time back in the 80s. The studio-in-a-bag was that mixer and a pair of mics and some wires and maybe a cheap pair of headphones. They had to add two recorders of some kind The concept was that they'd lay down their music tracks live and then come back and then overdub vocals during a ping pong. It was amusing and it actually helped a lot of folks get their heads together I think.


But, man, that little mixer is more than a bit of a joke.
Old 11th March 2014
  #6
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DSPDiva's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
How is a 9 volt battery going to be enough power for 48v phantom power? I don't know enough about electronics to wrap my head around that concept.
Old 11th March 2014
  #7
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OP, for the same price, you can get a Behringer Xenyx 802 USED on CL. I see them all the time in my area. It's a way better mixer.
Old 11th March 2014 | Show parent
  #8
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSPDiva ➡️
How is a 9 volt battery going to be enough power for 48v phantom power? I don't know enough about electronics to wrap my head around that concept.
Agreed that this is not a good mixer, but 9V for phantom power is not a problem.

Most phantom powered stuff would probably run ok on 3V, and there are plenty of phantom power equipped devices that don't run the full 48V - often considerably less.

However - a designer can always use voltage multipliers to turn 3V or 9V into 48V if that was actually required. Easily done if you want to spend the money on the components. The actual Power requirements is tiny - Power being Watts being Volts x Amps. So very little current is needed, so it could be done if it was justified.

Clearly not justified in this case. If you need a cheap mixer with phantom power, look at Mackie or similar - try to do better than Behringer.

But if you are recording to a computer or something, I would question the need for a mixer at all - get a good interface and do all your mixing ITB. At the low budget end digital far outperforms poor analog.
Old 11th March 2014
  #9
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theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Those who don't understand how a power supply of a given voltage can be stepped up in voltage (at the 'expense' of available amperage) should probably go back to their 8th grade electric shop workbook. I'd earlier posted a link to Ohm's Law but realized that would just confuse a lot of folks.

And here we are in these forums often discussing digital recording technology with folks who don't understand basic electricity. Modern life is... amusing.
Old 11th March 2014
  #10
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Rob Coates's Avatar
 
19 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Indeed. The Bellari MP105 (think that's the model) uses a wall wart and supplies 150 volts to the tube.
Old 11th March 2014 | Show parent
  #11
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kennybro's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Case ➡️
OP, for the same price, you can get a Behringer Xenyx 802 USED on CL. I see them all the time in my area. It's a way better mixer.
I've got one of those Xenyx Behringer 1202's for small gigs. The built in FX are strange, how they are split between the stereo channels. I'd much rather just have mono FX for live. But it sounds great, and with a pair of EV ZLX15P's, makes a very decent small PA. It's 90 bucks, and I've seen them used for $50.
Old 12th March 2014 | Show parent
  #12
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Lotus 7's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSPDiva ➡️
How is a 9 volt battery going to be enough power for 48v phantom power? I don't know enough about electronics to wrap my head around that concept.
Tori
Maybe we can help with the "head rapping"

It's actually fairly simple to convert a 9 volt DC supply to a regulated 48 volt phantom power source. There are active circuits generally called "DC to DC Converters" and sometimes more specifically called "Voltage Multipliers", Charge pumps", "Voltage Doublers", Voltage Quadruplers", etc. The circuit typically uses a transistor switch to convert the low voltage into a high-frequency square wave or a pulse train and then a series of diodes and coupling capacitors to "multiply" that voltage to a higher level. A simple step-up transformer can also be used, but that may be more expensive, heavier and take up more room. Some capacitor mics even include internal voltage multipliers to increase the capsule bias voltage to well above 48 volts for better performance.

There are excellent, very high quality outboard phantom power supplies like the Denecke PS1A and PS2 which can power (1) or (2) mics from a single 9 volt battery for several hours and which provide better "quality" (lower noise and better regulation) than most phantom power supplies in line operated mic pres and mixers. They are widely used in the video and film industries ahead of portable mixers without built-in PP when powered mics are used.

Finally, the vast numbers of widely used, low-cost 2X2 "hobbyist" USB or FireWire powered interfaces (like a Saffire 2i2 or a Presonus Audiobox) all have built-in "voltage multipliers" to provide PP for their mic inputs. Think about it: the only power source those interfaces have is the +5 Volts on the interface digital I/O cable.

Hope this helps a little.
Old 12th March 2014 | Show parent
  #13
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theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lotus 7 ➡️
Tori
Maybe we can help with the "head rapping"

It's actually fairly simple to convert a 9 volt DC supply to a regulated 48 volt phantom power source. There are active circuits generally called "DC to DC Converters" and sometimes more specifically called "Voltage Multipliers", Charge pumps", "Voltage Doublers", Voltage Quadruplers", etc. The circuit typically uses a transistor switch to convert the low voltage into a high-frequency square wave or a pulse train and then a series of diodes and coupling capacitors to "multiply" that voltage to a higher level. A simple step-up transformer can also be used, but that may be more expensive, heavier and take up more room. Some capacitor mics even include internal voltage multipliers to increase the capsule bias voltage to well above 48 volts for better performance.

There are excellent, very high quality outboard phantom power supplies like the Denecke PS1A and PS2 which can power (1) or (2) mics from a single 9 volt battery for several hours and which provide better "quality" (lower noise and better regulation) than most phantom power supplies in line operated mic pres and mixers. They are widely used in the video and film industries ahead of portable mixers without built-in PP when powered mics are used.

Finally, the vast numbers of widely used, low-cost 2X2 "hobbyist" USB or FireWire powered interfaces (like a Saffire 2i2 or a Presonus Audiobox) all have built-in "voltage multipliers" to provide PP for their mic inputs. Think about it: the only power source those interfaces have is the +5 Volts on the interface digital I/O cable.

Hope this helps a little.
I found your generous efforts at explanation valuable, for sure. But I'm afraid the party you're addressing may well need to go back to her basic electrical theory and work up from the there.

Far too many folks -- and I've been as guilty as anyone or worse at various times in the past -- have a tendency to 'black box' concepts they don't understand and rush ahead, counting on some sort of vague practical understanding of how the 'outside' of the black box works to get them past their lack of understanding of the fundamentals -- fundamentals which, if understood, would actually help them understand what they're doing at any point instead of working from guesses, assumptions, or worse, fundamental misunderstandings.
Old 13th March 2014 | Show parent
  #14
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Lotus 7's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 ➡️
...Far too many folks -- and I've been as guilty as anyone or worse at various times in the past -- have a tendency to 'black box' concepts they don't understand and rush ahead, counting on some sort of vague practical understanding of how the 'outside' of the black box works to get them past their lack of understanding of the fundamentals -- fundamentals which, if understood, would actually help them understand what they're doing at any point instead of working from guesses, assumptions, or worse, fundamental misunderstandings.
Sounds like you've been hanging around too many elected officials.
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