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Apogee MiC - How is latency? (with iPhone 5)
Old 29th January 2013
  #1
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Apogee MiC - How is latency? (with iPhone 5)

Hi everybody,

Does anyone have experience with the Apogee MiC and an iPhone 5? How is the latency for multitrack recording (Garageband, etc.)? I'm concerned about latency when monitoring myself in headphones while I'm recording myself singing or playing guitar, etc. and monitoring either a click or previously recorded tracks. Is the latency bad enough that it makes it difficult to sing or play while monitoring yourself?

I have an iPhone 5 with which I'd be using the Apogee MiC. Since this is about the fastest iOS device, perhaps the latency wouldn't be noticeable?

I read somewhere on Apogee's site that the MiC has (or can have) 23ms of latency - this seems pretty bad (unusable). Maybe this is a worst case scenario? Like using effects on all your tracks, and maybe with an older iPhone or iPad, etc.?

It seems to me that unless you're just recording sound FX, bird noises, etc., for any type of music recording you're almost always going to need to monitor yourself with headphones while you're recording and singing or playing - correct? Usually, you'd either need to be monitoring a click track or previously recorded instrument tracks while you're recording yourself singing or playing. So if the latency is a problem, I don't see how the MiC could be very usable. Nevertheless it seems popular, so perhaps it's not too bad? As I mentioned in another thread in the remote recording forum, I'd be going to a quiet park outside with my acoustic guitar and recording myself playing guitar and vocals. I need something handheld that fits in my jacket pocket, etc. My other consideration is a Blue Spark Digital (which has zero-latency headphone out), but it seems too large and heavy. Alternatively I could use a high-end handheld recorder (Nagra SD, Zoom, Sony), but I assume the iPhone 5 and Apogee MiC combo is probably much better (yes?), and I already own the iPhone 5. Thanks very much for any advice

Adam
Old 29th January 2013
  #2
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
I have one. My advice:

DO NOT buy the Apogee Mic if you are concerned with latency.
It's pretty bad.

Other than that, it's a GREAT product. But, as latency is your main concern, I would try something else (IMHO).

Hope this helps!
Old 29th January 2013
  #3
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Thanks Gideon for that reply. Sorry to hear about the latency :(

Could you tell me - when you've had problems with the MiC's latency, which iOS device were you using it with? Was it an older iPhone or iPad, and maybe my iPhone 5 might be better? Also - were you using effects processing on your tracks, and maybe the latency might not be too bad if I don't use any effects while I'm recording? Thanks again for your help.

Also Gideon - I'm wondering what type of recording you've done with the MiC, where you were still able to use it even with the latency. Didn't you need to monitor yourself while recording, and wouldn't the latency issue basically make the MiC useless? Unless you're just recording a single, solo part with no click track and no backing tracks... or if you're just recording interviews, sound fx, etc.?
Old 29th January 2013
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Boschen's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
You might look at Blue's Mikey digital.
I run the older model on my iPhone4s.
The mic and outboard conversion are great.
Sadly, the pro Blue app just sucks.
I use a very simple recording app called 'isaidwhat?'
It is superior to the feature clogged 'Fire' app from blue, which must convert files to export, and the export features are mostly not functional.
I use it to record band rehearsals and song ideas on the fly.
Old 29th January 2013 | Show parent
  #5
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by amargulies ➑️
Thanks Gideon for that reply. Sorry to hear about the latency :(

Could you tell me - when you've had problems with the MiC's latency, which iOS device were you using it with? Was it an older iPhone or iPad, and maybe my iPhone 5 might be better? Also - were you using effects processing on your tracks, and maybe the latency might not be too bad if I don't use any effects while I'm recording? Thanks again for your help.

Also Gideon - I'm wondering what type of recording you've done with the MiC, where you were still able to use it even with the latency. Didn't you need to monitor yourself while recording, and wouldn't the latency issue basically make the MiC useless? Unless you're just recording a single, solo part with no click track and no backing tracks... or if you're just recording interviews, sound fx, etc.?

The latency isn't a problem at all for me, so no worries.

I've used the Mic with all newer Apple products (iPhone, iPad, i7 Mac, etc.). With the iPad and iPhone - Garageband (no added effects), with the Mac - Logic Pro. All up to date OS and iOS wise.

I use the Mic for jotting down song ideas. It sits on my desk. I hit record and use it as an ambient mic (usually in Logic unless I'm mobile). I can multi-track ideas this way: i.e. drums first, acoustic guitar second, bass third, etc. But I Never Monitor The Signal That I am Recording As I Am Recording It. I just listen to the currently recorded source in the room and blend the volume of the previously recorded track in my headphones. So for my purposes the Mic is great!

If you're trying to monitor a source that you are recording while you are recording it, however, I would look for something else that has lower latency (if such a product even exists yet). Again, just my humble opinion.

Hope this helps.
Old 29th January 2013 | Show parent
  #6
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Hi Boschen, thanks very much for that suggestion. I have thought about the Blue Mikey, but I'd assumed the Apogee MiC is a higher-quality microphone (and preamp and converter) - don't you think? I'll be recording myself playing acoustic guitar and/or singing outside in a quiet park; although I'd normally love to record acoust. guitar in stereo, I thought perhaps stereo might be bad for recording in the park because it would pick up too much ambient noise. Yes?
Old 29th January 2013 | Show parent
  #7
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Gideon - thanks again for that advice and info. I'm a little confused however about how you exactly record and monitor yourself - do you wear headphones over just one ear, so you can hear what you're playing live in the room through your uncovered ear and hear the pre-recorded tracks through headphones in your other ear? Or are you just listening to your pre-recorded tracks through monitor speakers at low volume, without any headphones at all? I've never really gotten used to wearing headphones on just one ear; it felt too weird while singing with just one ear covered and monitoring the mix in only one ear.

Don't most people wear headphones (on both ears) while recording themselves, and monitor their live signal along with either a click track or previously-recorded tracks for doing overdubs? I've assumed that's what most people do, and I didn't understand how the Apogee MiC could be so popular if it's basically unusable for that situation because of latency.
Old 30th January 2013 | Show parent
  #8
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Maybe I'm sensitive to latency. Yeah, it's probably me.
Buy one and try it out. If you don't like it, return it. No sweat.

P.S. I monitor previously recorded tracks low in headphones (both ears) while doing my overdubs. The volume is low enough that I can hear what I am recording blended. Works for me (for recording scratch demos at home).

Hope this helps!



Quote:
Originally Posted by amargulies ➑️
Gideon - thanks again for that advice and info. I'm a little confused however about how you exactly record and monitor yourself - do you wear headphones over just one ear, so you can hear what you're playing live in the room through your uncovered ear and hear the pre-recorded tracks through headphones in your other ear? Or are you just listening to your pre-recorded tracks through monitor speakers at low volume, without any headphones at all? I've never really gotten used to wearing headphones on just one ear; it felt too weird while singing with just one ear covered and monitoring the mix in only one ear.

Don't most people wear headphones (on both ears) while recording themselves, and monitor their live signal along with either a click track or previously-recorded tracks for doing overdubs? I've assumed that's what most people do, and I didn't understand how the Apogee MiC could be so popular if it's basically unusable for that situation because of latency.
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