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Sound City - movie directed by Dave Grohl
Old 9th February 2013 | Show parent
  #331
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philosi's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Anyone else going to the concert on Wednesday?
Old 9th February 2013 | Show parent
  #332
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TexasCat's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hypnotic ➡️
I would be willing to bet that there were a lot more frustrated musicians in 1980 than there are in 2013.
Not in the world I lived in. I remember musicians having a "dream" and working hard to achieve it. There was something about "having to get heard" that was very motivating. The technology existed then for one artist to make the whole record by themselves and some did but for the most part if you wanted to get heard you had to put a band together and go gig.

Now you can just run down to Guitar Center and buy a bedroom full of gear and just upload it to the internet. You'll get heard by someone...

BTW, you could make pretty good money giging if you were good enough.
Old 9th February 2013
  #333
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tomdarude's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
...bought it on iTunes and loved every minute of it!!

it´s about a special place and time...about the nostalgia..and I have to agree to most of what´s said there.

big room, everybody miced up, console, tape...old fashioned but great way to track rock music. period.


It´s just a shame that there was no "next generation", that was able to take over SoundCity and keep it alive as a tracking facility (even if it was on PT).

ps: Josh Homme is sooo ****ing cool!!
Old 9th February 2013 | Show parent
  #334
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mitzush's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomdarude ➡️

It´s just a shame that there was no "next generation", that was able to take over SoundCity and keep it alive as a tracking facility
Hi Tom, you probably missed it, but as mentioned earlier in the thread, it's been taken over and is still a recording studio...

Fairfax Recordings, The Studio | Fairfax Recordings
Old 9th February 2013
  #335
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Sotsirc's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitzush ➡️
Hi Tom, you probably missed it, but as mentioned earlier in the thread, it's been taken over and is still a recording studio...

Fairfax Recordings, The Studio | Fairfax Recordings
Who's running it?
Old 9th February 2013 | Show parent
  #336
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Slikjmuzik's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomdarude ➡️
...bought it on iTunes and loved every minute of it!!

it´s about a special place and time...about the nostalgia..and I have to agree to most of what´s said there.

big room, everybody miced up, console, tape...old fashioned but great way to track rock music. period.


It´s just a shame that there was no "next generation", that was able to take over SoundCity and keep it alive as a tracking facility (even if it was on PT).

ps: Josh Homme is sooo ****ing cool!!
Huge +++++1 to all that!!!
Old 9th February 2013
  #337
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
If anyone logged into Reddit's AMA Q&A with Grohl yesterday here's a quote that addresses some of the um, "concerns" some folks have been on about in this tread.

Q - Hey Dave, I caught a screening of Sound City and loved it. Totally inspired me to get back into creating music. It's a dream of mine to record to tape but I just don't have the funds. What would you say about artists who record at home on their laptops due to funds?

A - There's nothing wrong with digital recording - just make sure it sounds like YOU.


http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comment...ave_grohl_ama/
Old 9th February 2013 | Show parent
  #338
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Hypnotic's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasCat ➡️
Not in the world I lived in. I remember musicians having a "dream" and working hard to achieve it. There was something about "having to get heard" that was very motivating. The technology existed then for one artist to make the whole record by themselves and some did but for the most part if you wanted to get heard you had to put a band together and go gig.

Now you can just run down to Guitar Center and buy a bedroom full of gear and just upload it to the internet. You'll get heard by someone...

BTW, you could make pretty good money giging if you were good enough.
So musicians don't have dreams today? That's silly to even imply. I know just as many passionate musicians now as I did 20 years ago. I also know just as many bitter ones, well to be completely honest, I know fewer. Sorry that it bugs you that people shop at guitar center, but I don't have a problem with it.
Old 9th February 2013
  #339
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AwTAC's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
For the people that are interested in sound city, you can also take a look at Goddard's One+One from 1969 which Im sure most folks not into the french new wave will despise, however (only) half the film contains footage of the stones working out beggars banquet, mostly sympathy for the devil on the floor at olympic.

There are segments in the movie that speak to the heart of the discussion here about music being created all together in the room and pretty much takes it to the next level as the film reveals mick's lead (and what really looks like the keeper vocal) being performed live with the rest of the band and the girlfriends doing the background woo woo's at the same time... (!!!) Show me anyone that can pull this off.

vibe? hell yes.

The other highlight of the movie is charlie watts' inability to play a paradiddle as drummer in what was at that moment in time, the biggest band in the world... It is very difficult to find clips online so you might actually have to *gasp* buy it, but its really quite amazing to watch the madness go down in Barnes, photographed by one of the most revered film makers this world will ever know. Interestingly enough, the film was released prior to the release of beggars banquet, so the two camps were working very hand in hand with the marketing of the entire project. Today this looks like just some cool old film, but then, in the moment, this was without any doubt, an *event*. Goddard. Stones. Insane.

No shots of the control room unfortunately, but I have never seen a better document of Olympic anywhere. If there is one, someone *please* post it up. The gobo arrangement in the studio looks real similar to the layout that led zeppelin had when they were there that year so a loose conclusion could be drawn that this was somewhat of a default way to load in and set up a band in there. Totally worth a look. But the record was mostly done live in the studio, some vocal overdubs, mix it, sell millions of copies for the next 50 years...

Historically, crystal synch location recording w magnetic tape for film was still a very new thing at that time, as was the Arriflex BL which was used to shoot the movie. This job was in every way on the cutting edge of technology available to the technicians making the movie and Goddard was absolutely pioneering into a brave new world, which arguably is a part of his statement showing the camera operator in the first bit of the film and would be mostly (imo) totally over looked and taken for granted today.

Without getting too film world on this board, one thing that hasnt been touched on is the fact that Sound City was edited by Paul Crowder who is kinda the Thelma Schoonmaker of our time. There are many, many reasons to watch this movie...
Old 9th February 2013 | Show parent
  #340
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rectifier's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Martins ➡️
Agreed 100%. Every music/band footage from the 70's has that eerie quality to it too...
Yea I agree, I get that too, I don't know what it is. When I was a kid I wanted to go to the place on the Hotel California album cover and the places in the gatefold album and now a lot older, when I see the early 70s pictures, it has a special quality. I'm struggling to put it into words.

Anyway, I just bought the movie and watched it and loved it, lots of cool people in the film and good memories.
Old 10th February 2013 | Show parent
  #341
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Kaoz's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by houndog328 ➡️
If anyone logged into Reddit's AMA Q&A with Grohl yesterday here's a quote that addresses some of the um, "concerns" some folks have been on about in this tread.

Q - Hey Dave, I caught a screening of Sound City and loved it. Totally inspired me to get back into creating music. It's a dream of mine to record to tape but I just don't have the funds. What would you say about artists who record at home on their laptops due to funds?

A - There's nothing wrong with digital recording - just make sure it sounds like YOU.


I Am Dave Grohl AMA : IAmA
Just read through that, reaffirms my suspicions that Dave Grohl is quite possibly the coolest guy in the world.
Old 11th February 2013 | Show parent
  #342
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tomdarude's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitzush ➡️
Hi Tom, you probably missed it, but as mentioned earlier in the thread, it's been taken over and is still a recording studio...

Fairfax Recordings, The Studio | Fairfax Recordings
totally missed this!!! THX !! that is great news...I´ll sleep better tonight
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Old 11th February 2013
  #343
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
A - There's nothing wrong with digital recording - just make sure it sounds like YOU.[/I]

I just saw the film last night and while I also felt that it seemed sometimes as though they were trying to say digital ruined the real human aspect of music, this quote confirms that it isn't the point of the film at all. The film is simply pointing out that the digital age made it possible for bands or solo artists to sound "perfect" without much rehearsal, and recorded in a way that takes away the natural give and take that happens when a band plays together in a room, inconsistencies and all. That said, Grohl acknowledges in this quote that you can still do that in the digital domain, you just have to limit yourself a bit tech wise and not have a mindset that you can fix every little thing with the computer. I also agree with others here that the real magic was in the console and the room, not necessarily the tape machine.
Old 11th February 2013 | Show parent
  #344
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcnelis ➡️
A - There's nothing wrong with digital recording - just make sure it sounds like YOU.[/I]

I just saw the film last night and while I also felt that it seemed sometimes as though they were trying to say digital ruined the real human aspect of music, this quote confirms that it isn't the point of the film at all. The film is simply pointing out that the digital age made it possible for bands or solo artists to sound "perfect" without much rehearsal, and recorded in a way that takes away the natural give and take that happens when a band plays together in a room, inconsistencies and all. That said, Grohl acknowledges in this quote that you can still do that in the digital domain, you just have to limit yourself a bit tech wise and not have a mindset that you can fix every little thing with the computer.

Yeah man, that's it!
Old 11th February 2013 | Show parent
  #345
Gear Guru
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitzush ➡️
Hi Tom, you probably missed it, but as mentioned earlier in the thread, it's been taken over and is still a recording studio...

Fairfax Recordings, The Studio | Fairfax Recordings
Wow!
Is that a Scully 16 track?
And what is that console? Looks handmade.
Old 11th February 2013 | Show parent
  #346
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Ain't Nobody's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hypnotic ➡️
While you may have a point, let me ask you this. Can you remember a time when someone hasn't been saying how much music sucks? I can't. Since gradeschool, all through high school, college, and adulthood. Been hearing the same thing: 1.) music today sucks 2.) it's unfair

I have been hearing how real talent goes unrecognized for decades now, and I imagine that there were thousands of German and Italian composers bitching about Bach and his royalty subsidized masterpieces in 1740.

The music business has never been easy, and I'm not really convinced that it is harder or that there is less talent today than there ever has been. Maybe the styles aren't what you like, but how is that different? How many times in history have the older generation been pissed about what the younger generation is doing? Probably been happening since we fell out of the trees.

And that comment about bedroom producers... Where do you think Mozart composed? Or for that matter, Keith Richards? They were in their undies, unshowered, making riffs, in their bedrooms. Nothing different there either. Maybe the difference now is that you don't have to beg and kiss a million people's asses just to make a song, and I don't see how that is a bad thing.
Can't remember any of the four decades I've seen where people didn't sit around moaning about how it's the worst time ever for music in general, and the worst time ever to be a musician in particular.

Also can't remember meeting one truly successful pioneer in any of those decades that shared those attitudes. Met a couple whose heyday ended long ago that just didn't understand anything new, but never met one who met current challenges and shared that sort of mentality.

Personally, I've come across several wonderful new talents this week alone... each of whom would've probably died before ever getting a big break in the old guard.

As for the movie.... Looking forward to seeing it this weekend.
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Old 11th February 2013
  #347
Gear Nut
 
🎧 5 years
I think one of the most important lessons from this movie is that,the producer was there working with the songs.This,IMHO,is what's missing in the home recording revolution.
Yes,they were the gatekeepers of the recording world,and if the songs were'nt there,you didn't have a record,(unless you had gobs of cash behind you).Those records got made,but became a matter of public embarrasment,and a producer was only as good as his last record.
The home studio has created a kind of "don't mess with my art"mentality,that breaks the link between the public and the artist.It's kind of a water everywhere,but none to drink situation.
With that being said,there is still some great music being created in bedroom studios,but those people are producers in there own rite,and for every 100 great musicians born there is probably only one great producer,one great song writer,but how will they rise to the top now,and lead those 100 to even further greatness.Perhaps the internet will provide all of the tools need for colaboration.
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Old 11th February 2013 | Show parent
  #348
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Mertmo's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Wow, great points Audiofreek!!!

I completely agree.
One of my biggest obstacles in trying to produce local records is exactly this.
People are scared of being produced.
It's much safer to do it yourself and not be challenged or have your "vision" threatened.

I'm actually getting really tired of running into it over and over.

Thanks for your post, IMO it's a very sharp addition to this thread.
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Old 11th February 2013
  #349
Gear Nut
 
🎧 5 years
Thanks Mertmo,even Sir Paul needs to a producer,and this evident in the movie.
Sometimes I struggle to convince bands/songwriters to keep the song under 5 min.much less the 2:45 sec attention span of the listener.
I also like the comment of Keith Olson,regarding John Mcvies comment about the Buckingham/Nicks version of Fleetwood Mac not being "anywhere near the blues",and Keith responds by saying "No,but it's much closer to the bank".This sounds like selling out to an artist,but what it really is,is making records that the public want to listen to and buy.
Old 11th February 2013 | Show parent
  #350
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2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aint Nobody ➡️
Personally, I've come across several wonderful new talents this week alone... each of whom would've probably died before ever getting a big break in the old guard.
But that basically means that they have effectively the same chance now. If you are going to get a 'big break', it means you have content that appeals to some sizeable segment of the population. If you do, then you'd have had a chance under the 'old guard', and that chance would have had some financing and hence a real chance at success. If you don't, you don't have a chance now either really. The fact that you can post your work on the internet isn't a big break. Maybe someone might pick up your song for an indie movie soundtrack, but with things so bad these days even the artists ahead of you are probably fighting for those types of gigs as well.

You can play around in clubs and festivals and such, but you could have done the same back when, and there would have likely been more of them to play.

And this isn't about 'how much music sucks' either. It's about how music is made. How much real musicianship played a part in the much greater success of music in the past, in how respect for real musicians drove young people to want to excel and work hard and how that benefits the world of music, how the humanity of music is being lost, etc...

One thing that I think is often crossing wires here, is that I'm not talking about this from the perspective of musicians, I'm talking about it from the perspective of a fan of music who wants the music world to be successful and able to finance a broader range of artists. I really don't care if people (including me) can sit in our bedrooms and record music. It's fine an all, but if it contributes to the destruction of what has made music powerful to people on a broad scale (which it clearly is not right now to the same extent), then I don't think it's good thing. 99.9999% of those people will never contribute anything meaningful to the world of music, however much fun they may have. If it wasn't detrimental I'd say who cares, but it's creating a whole generation of people who think that music is data processing, and who will now argue endlessly how the massive manipulation they do is no different from what used to be done, when it clearly isn't and you can hear that it isn't.

And the 0.000001% who will contribute something would have do so before, with actual backing and a chance to become something substantial who more than a handful of people will have heard.

Not that there won't be occasional exceptions of course. But this isn't about the exception but the rule, since it's the rule that primarily defines the world we experience.
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Old 11th February 2013
  #351
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Ain't Nobody's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
With so much more available in every conceivable sub-genre, the only issue consumers face today is how to weed through it all. Personally, I come across more well crafted music (by whatever criteria you choose) in a month now than I did in a year a few decades ago. Then again, I look for it.

From the musician's perspective: The fact that my dog can pick up a hammer doesn't mean it isn't a powerful tool in the right hands. Who cares that my neighbor's grandma recorded an album and posted it on her Facebook page? Doesn't impact me. The availability of tools and ability to circumvent barriers to entry does... dramatically.

As for the irrelevance of the internet, the top 100 these days is a who's who of modern promotional tools being used to the hilt... with and without backing. These days, ignoring those tools and having any success (with or without a label) IS the exception.

When I was talking to labels back in the day, it was quite clear that I was going to have to conform my artistic vision to theirs... which was all about commerce. Their producers, their sound, their decisions, their accountants. I didn't bite. If they had brought a Quincy Jones or a Nile Rodgers to the table, I probably would have. My vision means something to me, though... whether it makes money or not.

By circumventing those barriers, artists today can realize a truer personal vision without compromise. Call that a bad thing all you want. It's different. That's for sure.

Some fear change. Some embrace it. SSDD.

I love the well oiled machine of everyone on top of their game in the A room of a major studio as much as the next guy. (I'm sure I'll love the movie if only for the pure nostalgia of it all.) I'm just not lamenting that musicians and fans these days have so many additional options.





I remember a comedian back in the 80's saying: "In the old days, they had wine, women and song. Today, we have crack, phone sex, and Madonna." I'm fairly confident that joke has had some relevant version in every decade for centuries now.
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Old 11th February 2013
  #352
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shortstory's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lugo ➡️
How come every band shot from the 70s looks so cool to me?
Because they lived music as a lifestyle with style and dangerous abandon. These days it's just beards, workboots, flannel shirts and granola. Safe as milk
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Old 12th February 2013 | Show parent
  #353
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
it’s all about the song?

Quote:
The fact that everything is riding on the song can lose my interest after a few listens. That's just me. I want it all; great band, great singer, great record, great song and great promotion.
I hear what you’re saying. Yes, the song is important, really important. But then there’s this;

I Love Rock and Roll

vs

I Love Rock and Roll

vs

I Love Rock and Roll

In the first instance there is a great looking band (who had their own TV show) playing a great version of a great song and most people have never heard it, or of it.

In the second there is a nearly identical version of the song with a slightly different sound, and of course Joan F-ing Jett.

There are other versions as well.

It seems strange to insist that the song is all that matters.
Old 12th February 2013 | Show parent
  #354
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stevelindsay's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Great movie. Had a young band come down with their seasoned producer for a 3 day session. First night we all sat down and watched Sound City. The guys dug it, and the session went great. One of the best films about making music I've seen....
Old 12th February 2013 | Show parent
  #355
Gear Guru
 
Kenny Gioia's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I'm all for the idea of all the bands playing together in a room and not fixing anything but I have a few questions based on personal experience.

First of all, there are a lot of bands that have really good songs and a great vibe but can't really play together as a band that well. What should they do? Not record? Is it better that their music not exist?

Then there are bands that don't have a live sound to them at all but are still great. Like Def Leppard, The Cars or anything that Mutt Lange produced. Is that not worthy of being recorded? Isn't it just great music produced in a "different" way rather than in a "not as good" way?

I've never found one size fits all for music. I love very sparse things like Jack Johnson or Ingrid Michaelson and I love some very over-produced stuff like Queen or Jellyfish.

There is no definition of the "right" way to make records IMHO.

And if Dave Grohl and his friends have the right way, why do other records like Katy Perry and Lady Gaga still sell right next to the Foo Fighters? Does the public not hear this great difference when everyone plays in one room?

I've said this for years and I'll say it again here. The cream rises to the top. It may not always be your thing but if not using Pro Tools and using tape was really the best way to make records then we'd all still be doing it.

If the music industry collapsed because of digital why aren't the small shops still using vintage Neve and tape making a killing and becoming the next thing? Do we think labels have stopped looking?

I do however (as Feck pointed out earlier) find it disingenuous to see a movie made by millionaires making millions off of the funeral of one of our great studios. If Grohl and his friends really believed in the magic of this studio, it would still be as busy as ever. But instead, Dave bought the console and is doing what he claims the rest of us did. Take our studios home. Put your money where your mouth is Dave. This movie should have been about saving the studio and the proceeds donated as well. Oh well.
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Old 12th February 2013
  #356
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lobsterinn's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Very well said, Kenny. Pretty much sums up my various reservations about the film. Mediocrity is mediocrity; regardless of process, regardless of fame (McCartney song), regardless of rad consoles.

Still, it is a fun, light-hearted flick to watch on a historical and gear-nerd level.
Old 12th February 2013
  #357
Gear Addict
 
AwTAC's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
The sentiment is not crazy, however from a realistic point of view it seems a little odd to single out one millionaire and specifically blame him for not somehow shouldering the weight of the studio staying in business.

This guy made one of the most commercially recognizable records ever made there. Then brought business back there playing years later with NIN.

That **** ain't enough? Certainly wasnt his business to manage, but he sure gave them expert level tools to market that business, in the form of a platinum record created there.

Everyone has their own idea of "profitability", and the quarterly net that one guy is having a party over is another guy's worst nightmare, especially if that other guy had a booming business through the eighties and now its 2002...

It is very possible that a movie like this *could not have even been made* if the original owners were running the place. Often, what seems like a sensibly amazing idea to most people is not looked at in a positive light by all.

It wasn't DG's responsibility to keep some other guy in business. The end.

Someone please high five Dave Grohl for buying the console and saving it from a broker who would have sold the modules off in the classifieds here. There are *very* few people on earth anymore that can purchase a complete neve console at the market value and keep it complete, working, as a console. Very few people.

It can be entertaining to knock somebody in his position I guess, but there are two sides to every story and I think it's pretty damn cool that a) this guy saved the console from being parted and b) the turns around and makes a movie about it.

I know if I had his money, Id buy an island and would never be seen or heard from again. Instead, he takes his cash and WORKS and does at the very least, curious **** with it that handfuls find entertaining. It's somewhat of a shame people cant just high five the dude for that and leave the rest of it at the door. There are plenty of people with his kind of dough and you dont know any of their names because they dont do anything creative with their money.

Look at the thing he created instead of sitting on the beach however you like but I dont think it would be too much of a stretch for the people in this community at the very least to kick down some respect to the dude for keeping that console a console. Looking at some of the comments in here, you'd think he personally put Khartoum's bloody head in sound city's bed and forced them to sell him the console and close their doors. And we all know that's not what remotely happened.

I am desperately not trying to start a debate but look at the big picture. It's ok to hate the movie but there is one way to look at it that is just kinda cool regardless of if the document moved you are not. One 80 series Neve is still around because of him, thats kinda rad.

Or maybe I just had too much monty python as a kid. #alwayslookonthebrightside #whataboutapointedstick
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Old 12th February 2013 | Show parent
  #358
Gear Guru
 
Kenny Gioia's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Sorry. I don't see it that way. The guy bought the console because he wanted it. Not because it's a great thing to do for consoles everywhere. He saw the opportunity and bought it.

No. I don't expect Dave Grohl to shoulder the burden of this studio but if the rally cry of this movie is that it's a shame that these places can't stay in business, then he should have tried to reverse that. Someone like Mr. Grohl could do that without spending any of his own money.

For instance, he could start a small label (funded with investors) that catered purely to artists who would record in this studio. That label alone could keep Sound City in business. He could have created a scene or an entire movement based around this studio and the way they make records. He could have made a film (similar to this one) where all of the proceeds went to keeping this (and similar places) afloat.

But he didn't. He made a movie glorifying this time in music and is giving nothing back to keeping it that way. In fact, he's patting himself on the back for noticing it as if he invented the idea of communal music.

IMHO - it would be as if Bono found some old southern blues great that no one had ever heard of and made a documentary that told the story of how he invented the blues and it all goes back to him but he is still poor as dirt as he never received the fame and fortune he rightly deserved. Then he takes his profits from the movie and buys the old man's guitar.

Thank god he bought the guitar!!!!
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Old 12th February 2013
  #359
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lobsterinn's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Why would we care what he does with the console? It is no longer in the public sphere. It is in a private collection for Dave and his famous friends to make use of. At least if it was parted out there would be some more classic modules on the market.
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Old 12th February 2013 | Show parent
  #360
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foamboy's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowak ➡️
I loved it!!

The film is about music, humans making music together, simultaneously.

Stef.
Which is why I thought it was strange to have Trent Reznor. I mean most of his career solidifying projects were him AND a computer.

Seems a little strange IF this was really the point of the film.

It was fun,but I must admit that at the end I felt like it was REALLY an expensive promotional tool to sell some cd's and generate interest for his "new" analog studio......."hey everybody.....I AM the guy with only one of four cool analog consoles ever made! Come and book time at my studio now!"

But,it was fun to see some history and relive some "good ol' days".

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