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how to say no to an artist you don`t believe in?
Old 13th September 2012
  #1
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
how to say no to an artist you don`t believe in?

Hi any tips on how to say no to an artist you not want to work with or believe in?

I have a case where an artist wants to produce a song and need help with writing , instrumentation and producing. The song she sent was not good and she had bad timing when singing etc, so I feel its too much to work on.

I could overprice, but I feel she is going to pay whatever the cost is, so I`m a little stuck

I also don`t think my musician friends are interrested in the gig.

I feel bad but don`t want to waste her money.

what is the better way to say no?

thanks
Old 13th September 2012
  #2
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EddieTheRed's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmixer04 ➑️
I could overprice, but I feel she is going to pay whatever the cost is, so I`m a little stuck
That sounds like a win-win to me.

Overprice, and if it doesn't work just take the money.
Old 13th September 2012
  #3
Gear Nut
 
Dot.'s Avatar
 
7 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
well, if you're gonna get paid you have to do what you have to do. It's business, unless you have more interesting projects around, and you still can make the money then just tell your client you have a busy schedule
Old 13th September 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmixer04 ➑️
Hi any tips on how to say no to an artist you not want to work with or believe in?

I have a case where an artist wants to produce a song and need help with writing , instrumentation and producing. The song she sent was not good and she had bad timing when singing etc, so I feel its too much to work on.

I could overprice, but I feel she is going to pay whatever the cost is, so I`m a little stuck

I also don`t think my musician friends are interrested in the gig.

I feel bad but don`t want to waste her money.

what is the better way to say no?

thanks
By using the oldest trick in the book. Say 'My schedule is full for 18 months so unless you wanna wait....'
Old 13th September 2012
  #5
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travisbrown's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
"It's not you, it's me."
Old 13th September 2012
  #6
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BillSimpkins's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Do a couple hour "demo" session and see how well she responds to direction. You would be surprised how fast some people can improve.

If nothing gets better and you still don't want to do it, tell her that her money might be better spent on some music lessons and that you can try this again when she feels she has improved.

The goal here is to help her get better, if that is what she wants. If she stirs on it for a few days and doesn't want to work on getting better, then maybe her heart isn't really in it.
Old 13th September 2012
  #7
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audiogeek's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I'm going to have to advise against the 'overcharge/take her money' route.

Chances are she's not completely dumb, perhaps just a little musically illiterate. So it's entirely possible that she's aware of her shortcomings, and it's her understanding that you can fix them, or help her work through them.

So, if you charge her money, especially if it's more than typical clients would pay, then hand her back a recording of all her unretouched unmusical idiosyncrasies, I think she'll have grounds to be pretty pissed.

You're just playing with fire. So, either take on the challenge willingly and accept that you'll have to bend over backwards in order to get something workable out of her, or just do what the others say, and tell her you've had a change of personal circumstances and really can't take on her project right now.

While my gut instinct in these situations is to do the latter, you might find a unique opportunity to learn and grow as a producer/engineer if you choose the former. I'm often proudest when I actually HAVE polished a turd into something listenable.
Old 13th September 2012
  #8
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Jeezus. Just be a man and tell her that she needs to put in a lot more work before it'll be worth your time.
Old 13th September 2012 | Show parent
  #9
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillSimpkins ➑️
Do a couple hour "demo" session and see how well she responds to direction. You would be surprised how fast some people can improve.

If nothing gets better and you still don't want to do it, tell her that her money might be better spent on some music lessons and that you can try this again when she feels she has improved.

The goal here is to help her get better, if that is what she wants. If she stirs on it for a few days and doesn't want to work on getting better, then maybe her heart isn't really in it.
this is the best advice

if you keep an open mind and give her a chance to rise to the occasion, you will, at the very least, have nothing to "feel bad" about when you tell her the truth.


even if she doesn't rise to the occasion, she will come out of it with a more realistic grasp of where she stands, and as others have said, never discount the possibility that you will learn something yourself in the process.
Old 13th September 2012
  #10
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The Phoenix's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
The demo thing mentioned just might work.
You might also try this. Anything you can say you can also say in the form of a question. Example:

Statement, I don't think you are quite ready to do what you want to do. Why don't you go and come back when you get much better.

Question, How much better do you think it would be if you spent some more time getting ready before you actually started recording? Do you think we could do something to help you get things down a little more before we record? It might save you a little money, don't you think?


Phrasing in the form of a question makes your statement seem and feel like it was their own idea.

There are lots of ways to handle this. The above is an easy way and hurts no ones fragile ego.

Hope that helps some.
Old 13th September 2012
  #11
Lives for gear
 
dandeurloo's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I flat out tell them. If you can be specific be specific that way if they have an amazing about of drive they can be focused on what needs the work. You don't have to be mean about it but you don't have to dance around it either. Honesty is the nicest thing you can do for them.
Old 13th September 2012
  #12
Moderator
 
narcoman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
" I dont think I can bring anything to this song - it doesn't feel like something I can help with"...


or something similar. It's the response I occasionally get from high end mixers who get to pick and chose what they work on. It's polite but tells you "its not for them".
Old 13th September 2012
  #13
Gear Maniac
 
= F$ ='s Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
post the track
Old 13th September 2012
  #14
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Thanks for good tips appreciate it

She sent a demo, home made production, but the problem is that I don`t like the song at all. she have several songs and need opinions and help to decide which to record. But the first song is really bad(all respect to her). I just don`t want to let her come to the studio with high expectations. i think It will be a long way to go for her. and so much to work on. So if i take the job I have to spend alot of time on it, and I don`t work for free ( unless something gives major credits ). I feel this will be very time consuming process.

She seems like a nice girl but i don`t want to crush her musical dreams.
Old 13th September 2012
  #15
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
What about:

I think you are looking for a producer to help out with an arrangement etc . right?

At this time I`m not able to commit to more production jobs

but if you find a producer and work out the arrangement we are happy to record live instruments/vocals you might need and mix the project for you. Our rate per day is.............

let me know what you think
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