Quantcast
Daft punk, how they sampled back in the day? - Page 2 - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Daft punk, how they sampled back in the day?
Old 14th September 2012 | Show parent
  #31
Gear Guru
 
theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
I was serious :(



Everyone's a newb from time to time... and if they aren't, they aren't busy growing.



That said, there are probably better places to get a basic education in desktop music production than this main forum (if for no other reason than that there are many other folks here who don't have an adequate grasp on the facts but apparently do not, themselves, realize it).

Do some reading from authoritative sources on modern music production and the technology. Believe it or not, you can learn a LOT from Wikipedia -- although, as always, you should be careful to look for well-written and well-vetted articles that are properly cited from reliable sources.


Also, while not all the material in this set of tutorials (Tweak's Guide below) and articles is totally fresh, much of it remains pertinent -- and can help give you the 'big picture' that will help you see how it all goes together...

Tweak's Guide to the Home and Project Studio - a somewhat comprehensive guide to home recording

https://gearspace.com/board/tips-tec...echniques.html - tips and techniques forum here at GS
Old 14th September 2012 | Show parent
  #32
Lives for gear
 
BillSimpkins's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcb4t2 ➑️
Thanks! Fixed it.
Old 14th September 2012
  #33
Lives for gear
 
Joe Haze's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
I actually had this happen, one of my younger assistants didn't know hardware samplers existed and were wildly used "back before time"


I think FL studio has a ton of great creative options at your fingertips, but to fully be well rounded one must know where the things we take for granted come from. Daf Punk, Liam Howlett "Progity", ect... are all great because of their deep understanding of hardware.
Old 14th September 2012 | Show parent
  #34
Lives for gear
 
The Elf's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
if I make the sound deeper the tempo will slow down and if the pitch is higher the tempo will go faster
You must be using the wrong tool, or using the right tool wrongly!

Most DAWs these days allow you to pitch shift without altering tempo, or tempo shift without altering pitch (in fact it's usually harder to *stop* them doing it!).

I don't use FL, but a quick look at their web page shows that it features:
"Audio editing and manipulation including pitch correction, pitch shifting, harmonization, time-stretching, beat-detection & slicing, audio warping and standard audio manipulation (cut/paste etc)."

Everything you need is in that list, so break out that manual and learn your craft. Everything you need to know in life isn't on video or available through a forum!
Old 15th September 2012
  #35
Gear Head
 
SarahKim's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
i guess im just dumb :(
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #36
Gear Guru
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
i guess im just dumb :(
Just inexperienced, which is just a temporary form of dumb, but there is a medicine to cure it. Unfortunately it goes under the generic brand name of 'Hard Work.' You gotta put in the time to learn the tools and techniques.
Old 15th September 2012
  #37
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsowa ➑️
Since you are a vocalist, I would recommend sticking with singing and finding a producer to work with. [...]
Good thing no one told you to just give up when you first got interested in music, otherwise you'd never have ended up here to give this sage advice.

To the OP - electronica seems to really have developed from experimentation and imagination - people screwing around with sound to see what they could come up with. Some of the most prominent electronica composers really didn't have a lot of prior experience in engineering or production. In fact, according to many in interviews, they actually experimented with electronica because they didn't have the knowledge or background to do "conventional" music. Deadmaus, Dust Bros., Chemical Brothers, Crystal Method come to mind. Research on the net as much as you can, but match it with just trying stuff, all the time.

Once you start to understand the tools you have - how they work and how they shape sound, then you will understand how to start getting ideas from your brain to the speakers, rather than just by accident. And you will start to understand and recognize what you are hearing in other music.

Use FL, Reason, Ableton, whatever...all of them. Disassociate yourself from any one tool so you become the master of the tools, not vice versa. Terrible to just blindly use whatever one app sticks in front of you without understanding why or how things work. What tends to happen is you get stuck in a rut of the same thing over and over.

And ask more questions here (there is an electronica forum, I think).
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #38
Lives for gear
 
Joe Haze's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Yes.... The WHY always the Why.
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #39
Gear Head
 
SarahKim's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by travisbrown ➑️
Good thing no one told you to just give up when you first got interested in music, otherwise you'd never have ended up here to give this sage advice.

To the OP - electronica seems to really have developed from experimentation and imagination - people screwing around with sound to see what they could come up with. Some of the most prominent electronica composers really didn't have a lot of prior experience in engineering or production. In fact, according to many in interviews, they actually experimented with electronica because they didn't have the knowledge or background to do "conventional" music. Deadmaus, Dust Bros., Chemical Brothers, Crystal Method come to mind. Research on the net as much as you can, but match it with just trying stuff, all the time.

Once you start to understand the tools you have - how they work and how they shape sound, then you will understand how to start getting ideas from your brain to the speakers, rather than just by accident. And you will start to understand and recognize what you are hearing in other music.

Use FL, Reason, Ableton, whatever...all of them. Disassociate yourself from any one tool so you become the master of the tools, not vice versa. Terrible to just blindly use whatever one app sticks in front of you without understanding why or how things work. What tends to happen is you get stuck in a rut of the same thing over and over.

And ask more questions here (there is an electronica forum, I think).
All the bands you listed there i listen to XD and also Crystal castles i love them too but I cant seem to get changing the pitch to work in fl studio for my samples :/
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #40
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
All the bands you listed there i listen to XD and also Crystal castles i love them too but I cant seem to get changing the pitch to work in fl studio for my samples :/
Sarah, did you read my response to you in the other thread you started on the pitch shifting question? Just a note, try keep topics in their own threads. Makes it easier for others looking for answers to the same topics and avoids duplicate responses from multiple people.

Daft Punk,Madeon how its done?vocal canceling

Like I wrote, I haven't ever used FL, I'm a little more familiar with Reason and HW samplers and harmonizers. However, these days, the usual method is to do something called beat slicing. Then you can control the pitch without the downsampling/tempo change.

But this looks like a good place to start.

Fruity Slicer - Instrument

Then Google "Beat slicing Fruity Loops"

Another very most basic method - total old school way to do it: position samples along the timeline at the right spots, and individually pitch shift. There might be a way to control the pitch shift variable from midi input and automate.

Audio Editor - Stretch / Pitch Tool

Sampler Channel
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #41
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
All the bands you listed there i listen to XD and also Crystal castles i love them too but I cant seem to get changing the pitch to work in fl studio for my samples :/
don't be :/

here is a youtube tutorial on that very thing
if this is not exactly what you are looking for, keep searching youtube, because there seems to be several tutorials for every task on every program. Its crazy how much stuff there is out there.

In any case, your specific questions are better answered in more specific forums. There is an electronic music forum here which can likely help you out and I am sure FL Studio has a user forum of their own.

Old 15th September 2012
  #42
Gear Addict
 
Jimmy kiddo's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
Back in the day did they have sampling machines? how did they do it back in the day and what do people do now to sample and remix?
This the real back in the day sampling :
Delia Derbyshire - Sculptress of Sound documentary 1/7 ...

? 8:46? 8:46
www.youtube.com/watc...
5 Apr 2010
Old 15th September 2012
  #43
Gear Guru
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
That link isn't too good. Here's a better one:

Delia Derbyshire - Sculptress of Sound documentary 1/7 - YouTube

Als, the one on the Radiophonic Workshop where she worked:

The Alchemists of Sound (Part 1) - YouTube
Old 15th September 2012
  #44
Gear Guru
 
theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Back in the day, before there were affordable commercial samplers, the cool guys pulled their samples straight off vinyl grooved disks on turntables in real time, whipping them back and forth on felt pads with their hands, constructing new works on the fly with just a few turntables -- and a whole lot of sweat and carefully honed turntablism technique.

I never really got how much art and technique was involved in turntablism until a club DJ whose flat I was staying in in Amsterdam gave me a good demonstration. I hadn't been inclined to dismiss that art form before -- but afterwards, I really appreciated it that much more.
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #45
Lives for gear
 
The Architecture's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years


This is very similar to how the first daft punk album was produced.



Daft punk in 1997.

That Emu SP1200 only has 10 seconds of sample time, but look what can be done with it. Contrast that with Fruity Loops were your sample time can run into the hours mark, you have a tool that can be easily used to do what they did.

But theres nothing wrong with hardware either if you work faster on that kind of a setup. Check out Ableton Live if you want a DAW thats easy to play as an instrument.

And last of all, Have fun and experiment . Its also a good idea to learn the old ways of working to gain an appreication for the awesome amount of power the average daw contains these days.
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #46
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Back in the 80's Laurie Anderson had a violin with no strings and a tape machine playback head near the bridge. She had a bunch of bows "strung" with pieces of tape that had various things already recorded on them and would drag them back and forth.
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #47
Gear Guru
 
kennybro's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
"Back in the Day" we had a chip burner, if the of it memory is not just a lingering drug hallucination. We'd buy blank chips, put em in the burner and play a sound into it. Then put the chips into something like a SynDrum and bang on it.

Our drummer also got a Simmons SDS5 set in about '83 that might have been able to take the chips, if I'm recalling correctly (it's been a long time). Horrid things! Like playing a kitchen table. They gave our drummer tennis elbow.

I recall watching Stuart Copeland from stageside, I think we were at RockWerchter, 1980. They were doing Driven to Tears, and he played a measure of beat, hit a foot switch and the beat looped, while he riffed on the toms over it. Blew our minds. He denied it after the show, but we all saw it.
Old 16th September 2012
  #48
Gear Addict
 
Jimmy kiddo's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Roddey ➑️
That link isn't too good. Here's a better one:

Delia Derbyshire - Sculptress of Sound documentary 1/7 - YouTube

Als, the one on the Radiophonic Workshop where she worked:

The Alchemists of Sound (Part 1) - YouTube
Thanks for the fix!
Old 16th September 2012
  #49
Lives for gear
 
j-uk's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Most of the replies here are very helpful however they seem to be largely from people who started learning sampling techniques et al, early on.

My first sampler was a Casio RZ-1 with 0.8 seconds sampling time (had to look that up, completely forgotten..).
The benefit I had was that the learning curve of sampling and making music on computers was staggered.
The equipment was limited so there was a finite amount of learning to do. As things became more advanced I only had to understand the improvements rather than everything from the underlying concept and the subsequentadd-ons.

If you approach DAW recording today (in this cases sampling) the functionality is enormous and it very quickly becomes a case of not being able to see the tree because of the forrest... Limitations have to be self imposed today but I'd argue that this is probably not a bad way to go about when trying to grapple modern computer recording.
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #50
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
 
18 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq ➑️
they had actually developed iron and bronze by that time, so they could carve the audio as grooves into a plate of stone using an iron chisel

they they would take a small bird and place its beak in the stone groove and the vibrations would come back as sound

ha ha ha
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #51
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 ➑️
[...]

I never really got how much art and technique was involved in turntablism until a club DJ whose flat I was staying in in Amsterdam gave me a good demonstration. I hadn't been inclined to dismiss that art form before -- but afterwards, I really appreciated it that much more.
Look up Invisibl Skratch Piklz. Q-bert, Mix Master Mike who worked with the Beastie Boys, etc. It's insane. It really is a an art of sui generis. It can almost be called a creative competitive sport.
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #52
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by j-uk ➑️
[...] My first sampler was a Casio RZ-1 [...]
I probably have you beat, if not by date, then by primitivism. Started off with a dual cassette deck manually flying things from one tape to the other. Then I got a cassette 4-track, a Yamaha MTX-1, and could layer and bounce stuff.

Then had access to a Yamaha SPX-90 with it's Freeze function. You could control the playback pitch with a keyboard. I then had some 12-bit Roland sampler, maybe an S-10? By this time in the studio we were still manually flying stuff off the 1/4" machine (later DASH tape) to 2", reminiscent of the cassette days, because samplers still sounded awful and didn't have enough memory.

When I got a Kurzweil K2000, it was like someone handed me the keys to the world.
Old 16th September 2012
  #53
Gear Head
 
SarahKim's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
wow thanks for the information guys !
Old 16th September 2012
  #54
Lives for gear
 
The Elf's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
At the risk of this becoming 'The Four Yorkshiremen'...

My first sampler was a Boss DE-200 delay that could hold a second or so in its buffer and let you trigger it from a jack input. I sampled a bass guitar note of A, for example, then worked out where that A would need to be played as part of a bass sequence. Each note had to be stitched in place. Many times I'd get it wrong, but sometimes the accidents were better than what I'd intended.

I then progressed to a small home-built sampler plugged into the back of a Sinclair Spectrum. The sampler had a CV interface and I spent many painstaking weeks building a list of a CV values to note values table that would reliably trigger the right note from a Roland MC-202. When it worked it worked well - though often a few takes were needed where the CV input fell right on the boundaries between two notes and played the wrong one. I did a whole album with that sampler!

My first 'real' sampler was an Ensoniq EPS and there are still aspects of that sampler I miss. The looping was fantastic - never failed. When I progressed to an Akai S1100 it felt like a step backwards in many ways.

But yes, when I got my K2000 it was like I'd come home - what an amazing sampler/synth. I still have a K2600SX in my studio, and wouldn't be without it.
Old 16th September 2012
  #55
Gear Addict
 
Seb RIOU's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
SarahKim, you should definitely look the Ableton Live way. That software is dedicated to samples/loops manipulation (whatever it means in an all digital era). Especially Pitch and tempo manipulation.
Old 16th September 2012
  #56
Gear Addict
 
eddie.machete's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Elf ➑️
At the risk of this becoming 'The Four Yorkshiremen'...

My first sampler was a Boss DE-200 delay that could hold a second or so in its buffer and let you trigger it from a jack input. I sampled a bass guitar note of A, for example, then worked out where that A would need to be played as part of a bass sequence. Each note had to be stitched in place. Many times I'd get it wrong, but sometimes the accidents were better than what I'd intended.

I then progressed to a small home-built sampler plugged into the back of a Sinclair Spectrum. The sampler had a CV interface and I spent many painstaking weeks building a list of a CV values to note values table that would reliably trigger the right note from a Roland MC-202. When it worked it worked well - though often a few takes were needed where the CV input fell right on the boundaries between two notes and played the wrong one. I did a whole album with that sampler!

My first 'real' sampler was an Ensoniq EPS and there are still aspects of that sampler I miss. The looping was fantastic - never failed. When I progressed to an Akai S1100 it felt like a step backwards in many ways.

But yes, when I got my K2000 it was like I'd come home - what an amazing sampler/synth. I still have a K2600SX in my studio, and wouldn't be without it.
Sinclair zx spectrum! Jet set Willy! I miss my spectrum.
sent from the future
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #57
Gear Addict
 
🎧 15 years
It doesnt really matter what software or hardware you use really. The whole idea you like that Daft Punk do so well is gained from a Hip Hop DJ perspective of 'crate digging'. In other words searching for that small section in a song that can be taken and looped and serves as the main hook of the track. It takes a lot of trial and error and patience to find something useable. It is a whole other skill to make the embellishment on top of that sample (usually house beats etc) to make that idea work for 5 minutes without being boring. Again this is skill often gained by DJ ing.
Have you tried recreating one of ther tracks yourself? It can be very insightful.
Often the hook you find is the ONLY useable portion of a track!
I always love buying a load of junk vinyl cheaply and spending an afternoon skipping through, hoping to find a nugget! However these days you can do the same just using Youtube..
If you search online you will find all the samples Daft Punk used to make their albums, try taking one and doing a remix!
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #58
Gear Head
 
SarahKim's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifer ➑️
It doesnt really matter what software or hardware you use really. The whole idea you like that Daft Punk do so well is gained from a Hip Hop DJ perspective of 'crate digging'. In other words searching for that small section in a song that can be taken and looped and serves as the main hook of the track. It takes a lot of trial and error and patience to find something useable. It is a whole other skill to make the embellishment on top of that sample (usually house beats etc) to make that idea work for 5 minutes without being boring. Again this is skill often gained by DJ ing.
Have you tried recreating one of ther tracks yourself? It can be very insightful.
Often the hook you find is the ONLY useable portion of a track!
I always love buying a load of junk vinyl cheaply and spending an afternoon skipping through, hoping to find a nugget! However these days you can do the same just using Youtube..
If you search online you will find all the samples Daft Punk used to make their albums, try taking one and doing a remix!
yes I have tried but I tried to make the beat my own but i am struggling to do so :/ Just like how daft punk made there song from sampling other songs and made it completely different from the original. The way I tried doing it was try to make a melody from the vocals from my samples by changing its pitch but its not going to well for me :/
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #59
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahKim ➑️
yes I have tried but I tried to make the beat my own but i am struggling to do so :/ Just like how daft punk made there song from sampling other songs and made it completely different from the original. The way I tried doing it was try to make a melody from the vocals from my samples by changing its pitch but its not going to well for me :/
Takes work

Contrary to how it appears, it's a lot of work making good electronica. Takes a while to figure out how to make the tools do what you want, after you actually figure out what you want, and then figuring out what works, what doesn't, and what isn't cool just because how you made it was super involved.

One of the things that makes Daft Punk, Dust Bros., Crystal Method, etc. exceptional is they actually are really good composers and arrangers. So it's a bit of symbiosis of tools at hand with compositional vision. Since it's mostly pattern-based music, you really have to have a sense of when's too much.

The boring electronica is when someone just lets the tools do the work for them.

Just keep working at it. Every time you hear something you like, try figure out how it was done. There are lots of tutorials. Don't limit yourself to Fruity Loops - you need to understand the concepts, not just the process in one DAW.
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #60
Gear Head
 
SarahKim's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by travisbrown ➑️
Takes work

Contrary to how it appears, it's a lot of work making good electronica. Takes a while to figure out how to make the tools do what you want, after you actually figure out what you want, and then figuring out what works, what doesn't, and what isn't cool just because how you made it was super involved.

One of the things that makes Daft Punk, Dust Bros., Crystal Method, etc. exceptional is they actually are really good composers and arrangers. So it's a bit of symbiosis of tools at hand with compositional vision. Since it's mostly pattern-based music, you really have to have a sense of when's too much.

The boring electronica is when someone just lets the tools do the work for them.

Just keep working at it. Every time you hear something you like, try figure out how it was done. There are lots of tutorials. Don't limit yourself to Fruity Loops - you need to understand the concepts, not just the process in one DAW.
how about i just live with you for a couple a months and you teach me everything :D yay
πŸ“ Reply

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 50 views: 4492
Avatar for manning1
manning1 7th April 2009
replies: 708 views: 86087
Avatar for jbuonacc
jbuonacc 3rd January 2021
replies: 54 views: 10193
Avatar for Looneytune
Looneytune 23rd January 2013
replies: 1942 views: 228180
Avatar for A.I. Batule Chee
A.I. Batule Chee 7th June 2021
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump