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PZM's as stereo drum overheads?
Old 13th May 2006
  #1
Gear Nut
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
PZM's as stereo drum overheads?

Can you get a nice stereo image out of a pair of PZM's for drum overheads? What's the best way to position them?

...

BTW, I really think we should get a dedicated engineering section going on this board. Something like the hip-hop one, but for, uhhh... non-hip-hop stuff.
Old 13th May 2006
  #2
Lou Judson
Guest
I have used PZMs for stereo many time. There are two ways to get excellent stereo imaging with them:

Place them apart but on the same hard surface, like the bacl wall or the ceiling. As long as there is a continuous surface between them, it will serve to couple them and make it like one large microphone. Prolly need a low ceiling for drums, unless you have a great room.

Or, I have often hinged them with tape, so they make a V shape, /\ like this, with the point facing the sound source. You can open or close the width of the image by changing the angle between them. I once used this configuration on a tall stand to record a big band, with a few spot mics for guitar and bass, and it sounded great!

Try either or both of these and see what you think. You might be surprised at what a good sound you can get - but be sure to experiment a bit, and you'll find it quite useful.

I agree on engineering, gear only goes so far without experience and talent!

As for hiphop and rap, it is not music to me. I'm too old for that - but then I never could handle punk either. That's how old I am!

<L>
Old 13th May 2006 | Show parent
  #3
Gear Nut
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Judson
I have used PZMs for stereo many time. There are two ways to get excellent stereo imaging with them:

Place them apart but on the same hard surface, like the bacl wall or the ceiling. As long as there is a continuous surface between them, it will serve to couple them and make it like one large microphone. Prolly need a low ceiling for drums, unless you have a great room.

Or, I have often hinged them with tape, so they make a V shape, /\ like this, with the point facing the sound source. You can open or close the width of the image by changing the angle between them. I once used this configuration on a tall stand to record a big band, with a few spot mics for guitar and bass, and it sounded great!

Try either or both of these and see what you think. You might be surprised at what a good sound you can get - but be sure to experiment a bit, and you'll find it quite useful.

I agree on engineering, gear only goes so far without experience and talent!

<L>

Awesome. Thank you for the detailed help. Do you have a PZM model preference? Is the Crown 30d a lot better than the old radio shack ones? Thanks again!
Old 13th May 2006 | Show parent
  #4
Lou Judson
Guest
Crown is the best -0 though there are a number of other models from Shure, Schoeps, etc, but they cannot use the trademarked term PZM - they are called Boundary Mics.

The low frequency extension is determined by the size of the plate you mount them on - gaffer tape does nicely, on wood or plaxiglas. See crown's pdf for guidelines:

http://www.crownaudio.com/mic_web/pzm.htm - when you use a small plate it keeps the low mud out... I use them for voice recording without any plate at all...

I have aa 1988 pair of the RS ones - those you could cut off the 1/4" plug and put on an XLR for balanced use, but later models were unbalanced. The cheapo power unti is suseptible to RFI and hum, but in a good environment they sound just fine. There are people who can mod the power unit for much better sound and SPL handling, but I don't have the resource at hand just now...

Good luck - remeber to experiment!

<L>
Old 13th May 2006
  #5
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Gooch
BTW, I really think we should get a dedicated engineering section going on this board. Something like the hip-hop one, but for, uhhh... non-hip-hop stuff.
Me & few other guys brought that up a few years ago & we were shot down...seems that all anybody wanted to talk about is gear.



There's a recording techniques forum on the TapeOp boards that my buddy Tony Oxide runs TapeOp engineering forum!

PZM's really need some kind of hard surface behind them. I've seen people rig up 1x1' panels & mount those to mic stands so they can get PZM's over the kit.

I'd rather stick 'em on the walls on either side of the kit or maybe to some gobo's. Normally if I'm using PZM's on drums they're placed behind the kit or a bunch of feet out front on the ground...at least five or six feet away with about that much distance between them but it all varies on the drums, room & what you want to hear out of 'em.
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