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Upright piano recording at home
Old 15th November 2009
  #1
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🎧 10 years
Upright piano recording at home

Hi expert people ,

My 11-year-old son is a piano student (classical) and he needs to have some decent recordings of his playing either for competition purposes or just to listen to and improve.

Up to now I followed him around with a Canon HD camera and directional microphone and then extracted the audio when needed. Obviously this doesn't give good results.

Could you please advise me what chain of electronics equipment I should get ? (I have been studying the forum posts but the information is fragmented; I am totally new to this field so I would need to buy... everything I suppose !)

Thanks a lot !

PS He has a Pleyel upright at home
Old 15th November 2009
  #2
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🎧 10 years
what is your budget?

i'm not a familiar with them, but there are lots of flash or sd card recorders of the portable variety. You could spend anywhere from $100 to $1000.
Old 15th November 2009 | Show parent
  #3
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by j2dafo ➑️
what is your budget?

i'm not a familiar with them, but there are lots of flash or sd card recorders of the portable variety. You could spend anywhere from $100 to $1000.
OR MORE!!! This is Gearslutz!

Welcome - be prepared to have a much lighter wallet after leaving this place!

I'd first look at a pr. of reasonable microphones - something like the Oktava MK-012's (sometimes labeled MC-012's) - about $200-300 USD for a pr.

I'd consider still recording to the camera, esp. if it can supply p48 (phantom power/48v) to the mics, AND if it can record at 24 bit. If not, a better recorder might be a step forward. An Edirol R4, Zoom H4, or MicroTrak II would be a few of the cheapest ones.

Until we know what you are looking to spend, that's all I'll say, except - experiment with mic positioning when recording the upright piano - if the piano is against the wall, I'd suggest lifting the lid, and micing inside the front - if the piano is NOT against a wall, mic from the rear (soundboard) spacing the mics back a few inches from the soundboard, and not too wide - maybe 16 inches apart. This is a starting point - you experiment from there...

cheers and 'bon chance'!
Old 15th November 2009 | Show parent
  #4
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🎧 15 years
like said a portable hd recorder like the Zoom H2 would deliver nice recordings fir for your purpose and it's not so expensive.

if the results need to be like professional recordings, the chain becomes more complex and expensive and the room acoustics will be a major factor.

then i would record with a pair SDC's to a good clean preamp to good convertor to a daw and process it a bit.

a chain could be Gefell M265 trough a Forsell SMP-2 to an Apogee Rossetta 200 with a firewire card to a daw (reaper is cheap and good enough) but that brings you in total on +6K without the computer and the daw software nor the eventually necesairy adaptions to the acoustics of the room where the piano is standing (wich can cost a lot). For those acoustics i'm not a expert, but i know it's the major factor in the quality of the recordings.
Old 15th November 2009 | Show parent
  #5
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58 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
+10 on the Oktavas.

This may seem obvious, but remember that you'll need a couple of boom stands to go with them........
Old 15th November 2009 | Show parent
  #6
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead ➑️
OR MORE!!! This is Gearslutz!

Welcome - be prepared to have a much lighter wallet after leaving this place!

Thanks everyone and hope I'll still have change for a beer when you're done with my case !

ok so let me sum up:

1 portable recorder
2 pair of mics (I'll have to check them up in terms of price but apparently you agree on Oktavas ?) + better portable recorder + stands + what else ? (I own several computers, mac and pc)
3 full blown very expensive chain

Any other thoughts?
In terms of budget why don't we start under 1000$ and see where it leads Otherwise, yes the piano stands against a wall, it's a living room, has wooden floors and overlooks the Jardin du Luxembourg (acoustically it doesn't make any difference but sounds nice)
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #7
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🎧 15 years
Hi, I would suggest starting off with a portable recorder First, something like the zoom H4 (I have one and think its pretty good, even with the built in mics), and a stand to mount it on. Try to position the recorder pretty close to the piano (either straight down into the open top, or facing the back by moving the piano away from the wall. Also play with different materials under and behind the piano, eg. curtains and carpet) This might be enough to capture a good recording. If you still aren't happy with the result, then I'd move up to some mics, connected to the portable recorder.

As a gearslut, I have to agree that some nice mics into good pre's and awesome conversion is the way to go but in reality, room acoustics will become yet another major issue to deal with, and until you do, i don't think spending that much money is warranted.

FWIW I think save your money now and just get something to give you decent recordings, and when your son reaches a level where you'd like to create a pro recording of his performance, Treat him to some recording time in a pro studio. I'm sure he'll love the experience just my 2 cents

best of luck,

Qubi
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #8
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PlugHead's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandre ➑️
Thanks everyone and hope I'll still have change for a beer when you're done with my case !

ok so let me sum up:

1 portable recorder
2 pair of mics (I'll have to check them up in terms of price but apparently you agree on Oktavas ?) + better portable recorder + stands + what else ? (I own several computers, mac and pc)
3 full blown very expensive chain

Any other thoughts?
In terms of budget why don't we start under 1000$ and see where it leads Otherwise, yes the piano stands against a wall, it's a living room, has wooden floors and overlooks the Jardin du Luxembourg (acoustically it doesn't make any difference but sounds nice)
First check to see if your camcorder can supply p48 - if it does, you might be able to bypass spending more on a standalone recorder. if not, then you might be best to find a flash recorder etc.- I'd recommend the Zoom over the MicroTrak - I've not had great luck with the MicroTrak lasting long (I'm on my 3rd one now...) and being able to swap batteries (AA's on the Zoom or Edirol) is a def. plus.

The good thing about the Oktava's is you may buy/switch capsules - think of them as acoustical 'lenses' - sometimes using diff. capsules can provide better results, depending on the room/instrument/etc.

Lastly, I HATE micing upright piano when it's against a wall - kills the natural sound of the instrument, and provides the least appropriate method to recording. If you find you cannot get a good sound with it against the wall, I highly recommend moving it out from the wall to record it from the soundboard (behind) - a MUCH nicer sounding spot to provide the fullness and body of the instrument, not the 'boink' of the strings, or the clank of the fingers/keys/action/mechanisms...

best,
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #9
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TRCS's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I'm going to second moving the piano out into the middle of the room- or at least away from the wall. Try taking the front panels off too...

If you're wanting to record to a computer the Apogee Duet might be a decent stereo interface to look into. Works on Mac OS which you have... I haven't used one, but Apogee makes a high quality product. That and a pair of SDC and you should be good to go...
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #10
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by qubi ➑️

Treat him to some recording time in a pro studio. I'm sure he'll love the experience
Thanks Qubi,

I totally agree; I spent some time last night browsing and the H4n appears to be a nice start since it can be completed later by mics, etc.
Here in Paris I can get a pack with remote control and headphones for 359 EUR and unless some gearslut cries scandal I'm going to buy that.

As for the recording studio, I'm all for that (being a proffessional myself I like letting experts do what they do best): it's just a question of finding the right people around here.

Thanks again and I'll keep everyone posted
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #11
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead ➑️

The good thing about the Oktava's is you may buy/switch capsules - think of them as acoustical 'lenses' - sometimes using diff. capsules can provide better results, depending on the room/instrument/etc.

Lastly, I HATE micing upright piano when it's against a wall
Thanks PlugHead,

I'm a little confused about the Oktavas: aren't Russian made parts or servicing going to be a problem; secondly, I find very high prices online (more than 600 EUR for a pair): are they worth it compared to M Audio or SE or Studio Project which I can easily order here in Paris ?

Otherwise I definitely will move the piano (it's not very difficult) away from the wall when recording for competition purposes

Thanks for your time
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #12
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waxx's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
the oktava's are russian mics, but exellent ones, and they are branded the Oktava MK-012, the mc-012 is a cheap chinese illigal copy of it.

the sE or M-Audio are of lot less quality and sounding a lot less good.
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #13
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxx ➑️
the oktava's are russian mics, but exellent ones, and they are branded the Oktava MK-012, the mc-012 is a cheap chinese illigal copy of it.

the sE or M-Audio are of lot less quality and sounding a lot less good.

Ok thanks, got that !

Now, where to buy them ? (if you can't say that in the forum could you please email or skype me ?)

Tx a lot
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #14
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Darm's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Oktava -- Shop
and if you own a Mac that has a fw port- you can just go with apogee duet (it got decent preamps and converters)
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #15
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darm ➑️
Oktava -- Shop
and if you own a Mac that has a fw port- you can just go with apogee duet (it got decent preamps and converters)
Thanks Darm, I've been poking around that site and on ebay, I still find them pretty expensive...

So Apogee Duet+Mac solution better than zoom H4n ?
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #16
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxx ➑️
..they are branded the Oktava MK-012, the mc-012 is a cheap chinese illigal copy of it.
Not quite correct.There are many legit Oktava's branded 'MC'..been discussed to death in many previous threads.

But,yes great mics..used ones come up pretty regularly here in the classifieds,usually at v reasonable prices.

Can't go wrong with Oktava's + duet!!...better?...well the H4 is more portable (if you plan on field recording,gigs,etc may be useful)but you'll most likely get better results-in this situation-with the former...

..of course you'll need a Mac though.



F
Old 16th November 2009 | Show parent
  #17
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by fanriffic ➑️
Not quite correct.There are many legit Oktava's branded 'MC'..been discussed to death in many previous threads.

But,yes great mics..used ones come up pretty regularly here in the classifieds,usually at v reasonable prices.

Can't go wrong with Oktava's + duet!!...better?...well the H4 is more portable (if you plan on field recording,gigs,etc may be useful)but you'll most likely get better results-in this situation-with the former...

..of course you'll need a Mac though.



F
Thanks !

1.I think you're right about mc branding: I've seen photographs on very legit sites, they wouldn't dare picture illegal copies.

2.Classifieds !!! How come I hadn't seen that tab ?

3.How about H4 AND Octavas ? It's 4 tracks, right ?

Cheers
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #18
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandre ➑️
ok so let me sum up:

1 portable recorder
2 pair of mics (I'll have to check them up in terms of price but apparently you agree on Oktavas ?) + better portable recorder + stands + what else ? (I own several computers, mac and pc)
3 full blown very expensive chain

Any other thoughts?
In terms of budget why don't we start under 1000$ and see where it leads Otherwise, yes the piano stands against a wall, it's a living room, has wooden floors ....)
Hi Alexandre,

If I had $1000 to spend on this project, I would ask local professional musicians to recommend the best piano technician (tuner) in your area, and hire him or her to do recording preparation work on your piano. Then, with whatever money I had left, I'd buy recording gear.

Recording preparation work often involves much more than tuning, especially if the piano has not been used for recording before. Some other areas that a fine technician will address are:

β€’ Regulation (adjusting the small action parts to allow the piano to be as sensitive and controllable as possible)

β€’ String Leveling (ensuring that the hammer hits the two or three strings of each note at exactly the same time - prevents phase cancellation, or "open strings")

β€’ Voicing (adjusting the tone color of each note)

β€’ Damper regulation (ensuring that all notes stop in a controlled and uniform manner)

β€’ Noise elimination/attenuation (getting rid of or reducing the many small sounds that often emanate from the piano, such as squeaks, whooshes, rubbing sounds, zings, etc.)

When we hear a live piano performance, we tend to overlook many flaws in the piano. However, when we record the piano, all of those flaws seem to be magnified and are much more bothersome. Plus, they're immortal!

So, I am recommending putting money into improving the sound and touch of your piano - this will help your son to create more expressive and beautiful music, and will help his artistic growth and enjoyment of the piano long after the recording session is over. Plus, your recording will sound better, no matter what mics and recorder you end up purchasing.

One final piano note (I bet you already guessed that I'm a piano technician heh): If at all possible, do move the piano away from the wall before recording, perhaps 90 degrees or so from its current location, with the back pointing towards the larger part of the room. Move the piano *before* the piano technician comes, and don't move it again until after the recording is finished.
---
As for mics, almost any pair of small diaphragm condensers (SDC) will do at least and acceptable job. I got my Oktava pair used for about $200. Audio Technica 3031 mics may still be around new for cheap (discontinued). Even an AT822 or a used pair of Shure SM81's can produce good results, as can many of the Chinese SDC's, which can be had inexpensively.

I would judge that the success of your project will depend on the following factors, in order of greatest to least importance:

1) your son's playing/musicality

2) your son's teacher's knowledge and skill

3) the quality of your piano

4) the condition of your piano

5) the sound of your room and its ambient noise level

6) your skill in making the recording

7) the specific mics you choose (assuming that you use any of the mics mentioned in this thread, as opposed to your camcorder)

---

I highly value excellent mics, and spend too much money on them myself, so I am not discouraging you from investigating microphone options or buying excellent gear; I'm just trying to put it into perspective.

Good luck with it,

Joe
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #19
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PlugHead's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
"Sound" advice!

It's very easy to fall in the trap of throwing money at the wrong things. However, having a moderately good set of mics should be a priority for capture of that 'magical' event!

You will have to scour the internet and classified sections like here to find Oktava's for $150/apiece, but - it can be done.

Otherwise, I also agree with some other choices too - AT make good mics, as well as Shure (SM81's) and many lower end ones, such as MXL 603's - you could get in touch with Michael Joly who mods low end mics and brings the up a few notches - he probably has a few suggestions - you can PM him here on GS or goto:

OktavaMod - Affordable Boutique Microphones

Glad some others are pointing out the moving of the piano - it REALLY does make a difference - enough that maybe your son will perform even BETTER due to the new sound in the room.

Again, best of luck,

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeDeF ➑️
Hi Alexandre,

If I had $1000 to spend on this project, I would ask local professional musicians to recommend the best piano technician (tuner) in your area, and hire him or her to do recording preparation work on your piano. Then, with whatever money I had left, I'd buy recording gear.

Recording preparation work often involves much more than tuning, especially if the piano has not been used for recording before. Some other areas that a fine technician will address are:

• Regulation (adjusting the small action parts to allow the piano to be as sensitive and controllable as possible)

• String Leveling (ensuring that the hammer hits the two or three strings of each note at exactly the same time - prevents phase cancellation, or "open strings")

• Voicing (adjusting the tone color of each note)

• Damper regulation (ensuring that all notes stop in a controlled and uniform manner)

• Noise elimination/attenuation (getting rid of or reducing the many small sounds that often emanate from the piano, such as squeaks, whooshes, rubbing sounds, zings, etc.)

When we hear a live piano performance, we tend to overlook many flaws in the piano. However, when we record the piano, all of those flaws seem to be magnified and are much more bothersome. Plus, they're immortal!

So, I am recommending putting money into improving the sound and touch of your piano - this will help your son to create more expressive and beautiful music, and will help his artistic growth and enjoyment of the piano long after the recording session is over. Plus, your recording will sound better, no matter what mics and recorder you end up purchasing.

One final piano note (I bet you already guessed that I'm a piano technician heh): If at all possible, do move the piano away from the wall before recording, perhaps 90 degrees or so from its current location, with the back pointing towards the larger part of the room. Move the piano *before* the piano technician comes, and don't move it again until after the recording is finished.
---
As for mics, almost any pair of small diaphragm condensers (SDC) will do at least and acceptable job. I got my Oktava pair used for about $200. Audio Technica 3031 mics may still be around new for cheap (discontinued). Even an AT822 or a used pair of Shure SM81's can produce good results, as can many of the Chinese SDC's, which can be had inexpensively.

I would judge that the success of your project will depend on the following factors, in order of greatest to least importance:

1) your son's playing/musicality

2) your son's teacher's knowledge and skill

3) the quality of your piano

4) the condition of your piano

5) the sound of your room and its ambient noise level

6) your skill in making the recording

7) the specific mics you choose (assuming that you use any of the mics mentioned in this thread, as opposed to your camcorder)

---

I highly value excellent mics, and spend too much money on them myself, so I am not discouraging you from investigating microphone options or buying excellent gear; I'm just trying to put it into perspective.

Good luck with it,

Joe
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #20
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeDeF ➑️

I would judge that the success of your project will depend on the following factors, in order of greatest to least importance:

1) your son's playing/musicality

2) your son's teacher's knowledge and skill

3) the quality of your piano

4) the condition of your piano

5) the sound of your room and its ambient noise level

6) your skill in making the recording

7) the specific mics you choose (assuming that you use any of the mics mentioned in this thread, as opposed to your camcorder)

I highly value excellent mics, and spend too much money on them myself, so I am not discouraging you from investigating microphone options or buying excellent gear; I'm just trying to put it into perspective.

Dear Joe,

Thank you very much for your extremely valuable advice.

I completely agree with you. In fact I'm going to print out your message and review it with our piano technician when he comes over. He is very skilled and experienced (Yamaha and Pleyel manager) and I'm sure he knows exactly what you are speaking about!

If I may answer point by point, as a matter of courtesy for you and everybody who takes the time to contribute to this post:

1. My son took up classical piano when he was 5 and he's pretty good.
For ex we just came back from Osaka in Japan where he won 2nd place in an international music competition: he's going on radio for an interview with one of his teachers on dec 5th and I have no decent recording to give to the radio guys except the audio tracks of my poor videos.

By the way if you want you can check some out on youtube: search for "dimitri malignan" (his name)

2. He's had the same teacher for these six years but now he got invited to join a class in the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris (reputed music school, equivalent of Juilliard, for ex) so he's got three (sometimes conflicting!)

3.Piano is a Pleyel upright, good brand but entry level. I'm saving up to buy a grand but the problem is space: parisian appartments are so small !

4.It's in good condition, 5 years old (bought it new) and regularly tuned by our piano technician

5.Room is a living room on the first floor facing a very crowded boulevard.
So I guess noise will be a problem (can circumvent traffic noise by playing on Sunday early mornings for ex and shutting the wooden louvers and curtains). It's cca 6,5m by 4,5m by 3m high, with wooden floors.

6.Newbie

7.That's where gearslutz comes in so thanks again !
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #21
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waxx's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by fanriffic ➑️
Not quite correct.There are many legit Oktava's branded 'MC'..been discussed to death in many previous threads.

But,yes great mics..used ones come up pretty regularly here in the classifieds,usually at v reasonable prices.

Can't go wrong with Oktava's + duet!!...better?...well the H4 is more portable (if you plan on field recording,gigs,etc may be useful)but you'll most likely get better results-in this situation-with the former...

..of course you'll need a Mac though.



F
this is what the firm oktava have to say about it: Oktava: Attention - fakes! and i think it's clear!!
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #22
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxx ➑️
this is what the firm oktava have to say about it: Oktava: Attention - fakes! and i think it's clear!!
Hey waxx, it's very funny because it means one of the largest online shops, in Germany has a photo in their expert guide ( http://images1.thomann.de/pics/exper...tava_mk012.jpg ) that is a fake ! Should we tell them ?
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #23
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FarWestWrenchCo's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
+1 on the Apogee duet + Mac (Garageband software is usually included and adequate for simple projects, very easy to operate, easy integration with the duet as well). I use a pair of Rode NT5 small diaphragm condenser mics on my upright with nice results (not sure how they are priced in Europe compared to the Oktavas.) I recently scored a short film with this setup.
You should probably do a little research on stereo mic techniques - you need to be careful to avoid phase cancellation issues.
Good on you man, your son is very lucky!
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #24
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarWestWrenchCo ➑️
Good on you man, your son is very lucky!
Yeah, that's what I'm trying to tell him every once in a while

On the other hand if we get philosophical, maybe I'm the lucky one...

Thanks for the feedback !
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #25
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🎧 10 years
Alexandre,

If you're still looking for reasonable prices, you can get a pair of the Oktavas for less than 300 euro in Europe. Search for "OKTAVA MK 012-01 MSP2 MATCHED PAIR" on Thomann. **EDIT: Just noticed that this appears to be a different model from what others are talking about. Sorry! **

Never used them myself, so I can't recommend them, but other Slutz seem to swear by them in this price bracket. My personal favourite on upright is a pair of Beyer MC930, but they're rather more expensive.

I would avoid a pair of Rode NT5, as has been suggested. Just personal preference though... I've used an NT4 XY stereo mic (same capsules) on a Yamaha grand, and they just didn't capture the richness of it very well at all.

Richard

Last edited by hearingdouble; 17th November 2009 at 04:13 PM.. Reason: Model confusion!
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #26
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🎧 10 years
One more thought: Thomann (and many other retailers) are still selling SE Electronics Titan microphones for a clearance price of less than 300 euro each (they used to cost over 1000!).

A friend of mine swears by a pair he owns for piano: I understand that the microphone has a pretty fast transient response, making it potentially ideal for this kind of application.

If you could pull the piano away from the wall, and put a single Titan in omni mode about a foot away from the soundboard, I suspect you'd get a really excellent (albeit mono) result. If the Zoom allows you to blend the additional mic with the two built-in ones, then I suppose that you could introduce a little amount of the built-in mics for a touch of width. But at any rate, I'd rather have a fantastic mono recording than a weedy stereo one. Just a thought.

Richard
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hearingdouble ➑️

you can get a pair of the Oktavas for less than 300 euro in Europe. Search for "OKTAVA MK 012-01 MSP2 MATCHED PAIR" **EDIT: Just noticed that this appears to be a different model from what others are talking about. Sorry! **
Is it because of the one capsule as opposed to more capsules ?

tx for the feedback
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #28
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by hearingdouble ➑️
One more thought: Thomann (and many other retailers) are still selling SE Electronics Titan microphones for a clearance price of less than 300 euro each (they used to cost over 1000!).

A friend of mine swears by a pair he owns for piano: I understand that the microphone has a pretty fast transient response, making it potentially ideal for this kind of application.

If you could pull the piano away from the wall, and put a single Titan in omni mode about a foot away from the soundboard, I suspect you'd get a really excellent (albeit mono) result. If the Zoom allows you to blend the additional mic with the two built-in ones, then I suppose that you could introduce a little amount of the built-in mics for a touch of width. But at any rate, I'd rather have a fantastic mono recording than a weedy stereo one. Just a thought.

Richard
Very interesting ! Thanks! I wonder what gearslutz think...
Old 17th November 2009 | Show parent
  #29
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandre ➑️
Is it because of the one capsule as opposed to more capsules ?

tx for the feedback
I'm not sure: I'm not an expert on Oktava stuff at all. I just saw that a single microphone of the "MK-012" variety on Thomann seemed to be a similar price, so I assumed that the model included in this stereo set must be different somehow. Or perhaps I am just being stupid.

If an Oktava expert could shed any light...

EDIT: I've had another look and the difference does appear to be just a matter of the number of supplied capsules. I would have thought that just the cardioid pattern would be sufficient for this purpose, though...
Old 18th November 2009 | Show parent
  #30
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FarWestWrenchCo's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandre ➑️
Yeah, that's what I'm trying to tell him every once in a while

On the other hand if we get philosophical, maybe I'm the lucky one...

Thanks for the feedback !
I'm always happy to get philosophical! I'm expecting my first child next year, so I'm starting to be able to relate to your statement. I feel lucky and blessed, but then I haven't had to change a nappy yet! heh
Back to the thread - you could consider getting a pair of Little Blondie microphones from the gearslut who builds them named Sahiaman. I haven't received mine yet but people are raving about them, and they're cheaper than others that have been mentioned. Send him a PM!
Bon chance
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