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Guitar Amp - add Channel Select footswitch?
Old 7th February 2009
  #1
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
Guitar Amp - add Channel Select footswitch?

I don't know if this sort of thing is worth asking here, but I have a simple 2 channel Fender practice amp, the drive channel of which is selectable by a switch on the front of the unit. It does not have a footswitch option, but I was wondering what the schematics behind footswitching amp channels are and whether it would be possible to crack the thing open and 'add' a footswitch jack myself? It's just for practising but when you have to take your fingers off the guitar to engage the drive channel, it's not really worth having a drive channel at all!

I'm hoping this will be a reasonably easy project....
Old 8th February 2009
  #2
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Could be, if you know how to avoid electrocution. Which amp?
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #3
Lives for gear
 
BOWIE's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
If it's a modern amp, good luck trying to get a good connection onto that PCB. Most of the newer stuff is fragile inside with no room.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #4
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
It is pretty modern; it's a Fender Frontman 15G. I was under the impression I might be able to just swap the switch in the front of the unit for another switch in a foot pedal on the floor, maybe connected by a TRS socket? Or do you guys think the switch controls channel switching electronically, like a relay or something? That would make things a lot harder.....
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #5
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BOWIE's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by peanutismint ➑️
It is pretty modern; it's a Fender Frontman 15G. I was under the impression I might be able to just swap the switch in the front of the unit for another switch in a foot pedal on the floor, maybe connected by a TRS socket? Or do you guys think the switch controls channel switching electronically, like a relay or something? That would make things a lot harder.....
Oper her up and see if the switch is the kind that's mounted directly to the PCB.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #6
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
Okay....I took a photo with my phone - it's not great but you should be able to make out the switch:



So it looks like it's just a normal surface mounted one, so I'd imagine it'd be possible to just swap that out for a remote switch? i.e. a similar single pole double throw switch but housed in a switchbox?

The other question is, if I can in fact do this, would I be able to use a TRS cable/socket to do the same function? Or do they work differently? I always assumed they worked by sending a signal, or maybe more likely a ground signal down the cable and the amp 'listens' to this and then changes channels accordingly? Rather than actually sending current down the cable?

I obviously don't know my stuff here so if anyone could lend their technical expertise, I'd be most grateful!
Old 9th February 2009 | Show parent
  #7
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BOWIE's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by peanutismint ➑️
Okay....I took a photo with my phone - it's not great but you should be able to make out the switch:



So it looks like it's just a normal surface mounted one, so I'd imagine it'd be possible to just swap that out for a remote switch? i.e. a similar single pole double throw switch but housed in a switchbox?

The other question is, if I can in fact do this, would I be able to use a TRS cable/socket to do the same function? Or do they work differently? I always assumed they worked by sending a signal, or maybe more likely a ground signal down the cable and the amp 'listens' to this and then changes channels accordingly? Rather than actually sending current down the cable?

I obviously don't know my stuff here so if anyone could lend their technical expertise, I'd be most grateful!

That's what I was afraid of. I don't know if that switch works by breaking continuity (like a footswitch) or by directing the signal path (not likely but who knows. You should be able to tell if you get a look at the underside of the PCB and see what's going on in terms of the path. I mostly work on vintage amps and avoid things like this whenever possible so hopefully somebody else can give a quicker answer.
Old 9th February 2009 | Show parent
  #8
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
Okay, thanks for that, Bowie. I'll take a look at the underside but I don't really know what I'm looking for, so if you or anyone else has any further input, i'd be most grateful.

Cheers!
Old 4th August 2009 | Show parent
  #9
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
footswitch madness

Quote:
Originally Posted by peanutismint ➑️
Okay, thanks for that, Bowie. I'll take a look at the underside but I don't really know what I'm looking for, so if you or anyone else has any further input, i'd be most grateful.

what you need my friend is much easier than you think???

there are two scenarios:

Scenario One - if the switch is a momentary type like a tactile switch, then the solution is easy, locate yourself a "Non-latching" footswitch or substitute & simply solder wires to the PCB then to a 1/4" jack, mount it and she'll be apples

Scenario Two - if the switch is a DPDT latching Type (like most small solidstate practice amps) then all you will have to do is use a DPDT relay and solder it to the same terminal as the original switch on the PCB (you can even leave the original switch intact) now run the trigger wires to a 1/4" input jack & "steal" the required voltage (usually 12VDC) from a suitable location on the PCB and she'll be even bigger apples

either method will accommodate the 1/4 input jack requirement you seek, however method one will have to have a custom non-latching footswitch if that is the case.

in most cases with these little amps it will be method Two.


hope this helps...
Old 10th March 2010 | Show parent
  #10
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
Did you end up getting this sorted? I am after the exact same instructions....for my Marshall Zakk Wylde MSZW amp. It has no footswitch (input 0 at all).
Cheers
Old 10th March 2010 | Show parent
  #11
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sikaudio_com ➑️
Did you end up getting this sorted? I am after the exact same instructions....for my Marshall Zakk Wylde MSZW amp. It has no footswitch (input 0 at all).
Cheers
Nah, to be honest it sounds like more trouble than it's worth; I had hoped itd be an easy job but it's not like I desperately need it... Might get around to it one day!

Let me know if you have any success!
Old 11th March 2010 | Show parent
  #12
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Ron Vogel's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Just get a long stick....
Old 11th March 2010 | Show parent
  #13
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Vogel ➑️
Just get a long stick....
Hahaha, indeed!! :-)
Old 10th December 2010 | Show parent
  #14
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
a very helpful mod

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexis_9654 ➑️
there are two scenarios:
Scenario One - if the switch is a momentary type like a tactile switch, then the solution is easy, locate yourself a "Non-latching" footswitch or substitute & simply solder wires to the PCB then to a 1/4" jack, mount it and she'll be apples

Scenario Two - if the switch is a DPDT latching Type (like most small solidstate practice amps) then all you will have to do is use a DPDT relay and solder it to the same terminal as the original switch on the PCB (you can even leave the original switch intact) now run the trigger wires to a 1/4" input jack & "steal" the required voltage (usually 12VDC) from a suitable location on the PCB and she'll be even bigger apples

either method will accommodate the 1/4 input jack requirement you seek, however method one will have to have a custom non-latching footswitch if that is the case.

in most cases with these little amps it will be method Two.


hope this helps...
i'm also considering this at the moment but I still need more info on this.

so which kind of switch do I have? and where do you suggest we "steal" 12vdc? which ones are the trigger wires? how do I wire the 1/4 input jack?

thank you.


fish
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Guitar Amp - add Channel Select footswitch?-dscn8920.jpg   Guitar Amp - add Channel Select footswitch?-dscn8915.jpg  
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File Type: pdf Marshall MG10CDS.pdf (60.4 KB, 947 views)
Old 20th August 2018 | Show parent
  #15
Here for the gear
 
Hi, I know this thread is really old but how do I know what DPDT relay you need for this to work (type nr of relay)?
Old 18th July 2020
  #16
Here for the gear
 
Footswitchable Frontman

I am doing the same, and I don't think that option 1 is gonna work. At least I can't do it yet. Elsewhere-on Youtube someone demos his footswitch which when I found the image on Dropbox, IT IS an electronic relay. It's only a picture of his pcb and no instructions! ARGHHH! I'll attach the image. If anybody can help us or me if I am the only one doing this, PLEASE shed some light on it for me/us.
Attached Thumbnails
Guitar Amp - add Channel Select footswitch?-save_20200616_015613.jpg  
Old 18th July 2020 | Show parent
  #17
Here for the gear
 
I have a picture/image of what someone did to get a footswitch. Could you please give me/us further advice. The owner of the image only had an image and no info.http://https://www.dropbox.com/s/77o...15613.jpg?dl=0
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