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Best Pop Filter
Old 20th July 2014 | Show parent
  #91
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Willett ➡️
I'm puzzled as you are the *only* person to say this.

Someone started a thread on the Sound On Sound forum just to praise the P110, saying: "It's that damn good. If you have a gnat's buttock voice like mine that has so much damn 'air' that I often fall backwards then you HAVE to get this shield. Best money I have spent in ages."

Hugh Robjohns in his review said: "To my ears the P110 is completely transparent and brilliantly effective, and the new gooseneck version is very easy to use with any microphone in any configuration. The P110 is a little more expensive than the typical budget fabric units, but less expensive than most metal options and a certain German mic manufacturer's bespoke model. However, it sounds more transparent than all of them and is far better engineered than most. If you are in need of a pop screen — and who isn't? — I can't recommend the Håkan P110 highly enough."

So I cannot understand why you think it doesn't work.

It's not supposed to change every P and B you sing and they are supposed to sound exactly like you sing them - it's just designed to prevent the plosives from popping the diaphragm, which it does do extremely well.
No, it doesn't, and I don't care what Hugh Robjohns says. You were very pleasant to deal with, no problems with that, but after six months of frustration I felt like saving someone else the same headache -- and after 10 years plus of being on Gearslutz you can't find anything remotely resembling a pattern of me randomly attacking audio products.

The plain old silk stocking stops pops from every single P and B I sing. The Hakam doesn't stop a single one.
Old 21st July 2014 | Show parent
  #92
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg ➡️
No, it doesn't, and I don't care what Hugh Robjohns says. You were very pleasant to deal with, no problems with that, but after six months of frustration I felt like saving someone else the same headache -- and after 10 years plus of being on Gearslutz you can't find anything remotely resembling a pattern of me randomly attacking audio products.

The plain old silk stocking stops pops from every single P and B I sing. The Hakam doesn't stop a single one.
I'm really puzzled about this as, really, you are the *only* one who says this.

Everyone else finds it works perfectly.

I just tested it by making the most plosive sounds I could make and feeling the pressure on my hand - putting a P110 between and I could feel nothing at all - absolutely zero (10cm normal distance).

The only way it's possible for a plosive to get through is if the P110 is touching the mic. and you are singing with your mouth almost touching the pop filter.

But any other filter would have the same effect, I would have thought, used that close.

But I really *am* very puzzled as what you describe is unknown from any other user. So, please, can you send me a sample recording showing the effect and letting me know the distance from the filter to the mic. and the distance of your mouth to the filter. I will send this to the manufacturer for his comments.
Old 21st July 2014 | Show parent
  #93
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
One factor that may be in play is the fact that after vocal lessons, I have a lot more air to work with. That said, I strive to sing smoothly without screaming, and if I want to shout briefly I back off the mic.

I also don't recall any warning labels that came with the product cautioning "Don't sing an inch to an inch and a half from your pop filter." Isn't the whole idea to sing where you want to sing without worrying about pops?

Matter of fact, when I first got the filter, I was singing six inches off the filter and was surprised I was getting pops.

At that point in my extensive project I was just doing rough vocals so a pop here and there wasn't that big a deal. But now it's prime time and the Hakam is at this point in time utterly useless, as you say that if I'm anywhere near the filter it will pop.

I can send a sample, but why would I if you state that if I sing anywhere close to the filter I'll get pops like I wasn't using the filter? That is what you said, isn't it?
Old 21st July 2014 | Show parent
  #94
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg ➡️
One factor that may be in play is the fact that after vocal lessons, I have a lot more air to work with. That said, I strive to sing smoothly without screaming, and if I want to shout briefly I back off the mic.

I also don't recall any warning labels that came with the product cautioning "Don't sing an inch to an inch and a half from your pop filter." Isn't the whole idea to sing where you want to sing without worrying about pops?

Matter of fact, when I first got the filter, I was singing six inches off the filter and was surprised I was getting pops.

At that point in my extensive project I was just doing rough vocals so a pop here and there wasn't that big a deal. But now it's prime time and the Hakam is at this point in time utterly useless, as you say that if I'm anywhere near the filter it will pop.

I can send a sample, but why would I if you state that if I sing anywhere close to the filter I'll get pops like I wasn't using the filter? That is what you said, isn't it?
No, I was *not* saying you would get pops of you sing close to the filter.

What really is important - with any pop filter - is the distance between the filter and the microphone.

If you are singing 6" away, it's better to have the filter closer to your mouth.

Wind protection works by creating a volume of still air round the microphone - so, the further away from the microphone the filter is, the better the protection.

So this means - get the filter as far away from the microphone as possible that still gives you the sound (proximity effect) you want, and then sing close to the filter.

Doing it the other way round, with the filter close to the mic. and singing further away will worsen the results.

This holds true for any pop filter by any manufacturer.

If you sing 6" away and the filter is touching the mic. you could get pops (with any filter) - if you sing 6" away, with the filter touching your mouth, you won't get pops.

In practice - with a 6" singing distance, you would probably have the filter abut 4" from the mic. and 2" from your mouth.

I hope this helps.
Old 21st July 2014 | Show parent
  #95
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
I'll try your suggestion and throw in singing at a slight angle and let you know how it goes.

Perhaps Hakam/Rycote might want to tap into your knowledge of physics and acoustics and include what you just said in their packaging, thus possibly heading off potentially frustrating user experiences like mine.
Old 21st July 2014 | Show parent
  #96
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg ➡️
I'll try your suggestion and throw in singing at a slight angle and let you know how it goes.

Perhaps Hakam/Rycote might want to tap into your knowledge of physics and acoustics and include what you just said in their packaging, thus possibly heading off potentially frustrating user experiences like mine.
From this, I guess you had the pop filter next to the mic...


What I said is true for every type of pop filter - metal and nylon ones, as well as foam ones.

I don't think any manufacture puts in details like this - now you mention it, I don't know why.

I hope you now find it works.
Old 21st July 2014
  #97
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Piedpiper's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
It's funny how some things don't get mentioned. I noticed there's one other person here at least that angles their pop filter, something that I never have seen outside my studio. It's not a cure all but it stands to reason that it would deflect much of the plosive rather than pass it through. Don't know why more people haven't thought of that...
Old 27th July 2014 | Show parent
  #98
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
OK, had a chance to test things out.

First I should note that the last time I recorded a lot it was with a plain old nylon filter and a Rode Classic mic. Pops were a non-factor no matter where I placed the filter or how far away from it I sang .

Recently, I started using a Stellar CM6 LDC mic and the aforementioned Hakam pop filter and was getting all sorts of pops; since my previous setup was so forgiving, it seemed like the Hakam just plain didn't work.

However, on the advice of my mix engineer, I've just switched from the Stellar CM6 which I rather liked to a humble but more flattering for my voice CAD M9 after a direct shootout. I wasn't expecting that result, but for me the CM6 was a bit too sibilant and it failed to pickup some flattering overtones that the silly cheap M9 did, which it did without accentuating any siblilance.

So my test today was with the M9.

After recording phrases with as many P and B words as I could throw in, I have to conclude that at least for me the CM6 really exaggerates my plosives.

The M9 picked up way less plosives without any pop filter than the CM6 with a pop filter (I'll reiterate this was for my voice; I don't claim my conclusions are universal conclusions for every singer). Using the Hakam filter, maybe one out of 25 plosives was picked up, and that was subtle.

This was after taking John's suggestion to sing close to the filter, which was placed about 2 inches from the mic.

To be more scientific, I could go back and try the CM6 again, using the Hakam and singing close to the filter, but I have a lot of songs to record so I have to choose my battles and since I won't actually be using the CM6, I choose to quit while I was ahead. I've found a workable combination which is all I really care about.

I'm sure John cares about having happy customers, so here's my admission I have now become a happy enough customer after taking his advice about where to place the filter -- advice which could have come with the documentation.

That said, maybe this thread will help someone know where to position a filter for best results.

p.s. Tim, I was talking about singing at an angle from the mic, not angling the filter ... though angling the filter might encourage certain singers to align themselves in a position which will help prevent plosives.

OK, I didn't originate the quote but all's well that ends well.
Old 27th July 2014 | Show parent
  #99
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Before any CM6 advocates get defensive I should mention that the original tube was replaced with a NOS tube; that could have been the source of the sibilance and exaggerated plosives.

I'll also say I felt very creative singing through the CM6 and empowered to try things that were new for me.

So I don't regret purchasing one at all. In fact I would have been perfectly happy with it if I hadn't stumbled across a mic that was just a little better for me.
Old 31st July 2014 | Show parent
  #100
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StarfishMusic's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg ➡️
This was after taking John's suggestion to sing close to the filter, which was placed about 2 inches from the mic.
2 inches puts the pop screen super close to the mic, especially if youre gonna sing eating the thing. If you really want to sing 5 inches from the mic (which is going to give ALOT of proximity thickening and eating of highs, than try moving the pop filter to at least 3 or 4 inches. I wouldnt expect any pop filter to work at 2 inches off if you are only an inch or 2 from it. If it can thats one impressive pop filter. If you are really singing at a total distance of 3 inches from the mic, I just have to ask why? Also at those distances any belting will clip most mics.
Old 31st July 2014 | Show parent
  #101
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarfishMusic ➡️
2 inches puts the pop screen super close to the mic, especially if youre gonna sing eating the thing. If you really want to sing 5 inches from the mic (which is going to give ALOT of proximity thickening and eating of highs, than try moving the pop filter to at least 3 or 4 inches. I wouldnt expect any pop filter to work at 2 inches off if you are only an inch or 2 from it. If it can thats one impressive pop filter. If you are really singing at a total distance of 3 inches from the mic, I just have to ask why? Also at those distances any belting will clip most mics.
Agreed - actually, I didn't say sing close to the pop filter per se - but that it's more important to have a good filter to mic distance than filter to mouth distance; as it is the filter to mic distance that is the volume of still air that protects against the plosives.

So - if you *have* to sing close to the mic because you want a large proximity effect - *then* it's better to maximise the filter to mic distance and sing close to the filter.

I hope this is clear.
Old 3rd August 2014 | Show parent
  #102
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarfishMusic ➡️
2 inches puts the pop screen super close to the mic, especially if youre gonna sing eating the thing. If you really want to sing 5 inches from the mic (which is going to give ALOT of proximity thickening and eating of highs, than try moving the pop filter to at least 3 or 4 inches. I wouldnt expect any pop filter to work at 2 inches off if you are only an inch or 2 from it. If it can thats one impressive pop filter. If you are really singing at a total distance of 3 inches from the mic, I just have to ask why? Also at those distances any belting will clip most mics.
Because there are just as many examples of vocalists who did well singing close to the mic as there of vocalists who did well singing farther away from the mic -- the studio shots of Frank Sinatra singing two feet from the mic being a prime example of the latter theory.

For an example of the former, in the last music video I watched on Netflix, the Journey documentary Don't Stop Believing, their singer is maybe three inches from the mic in the studio footage at the very end. Love or hate their material, with their track record, can you disagree that the guys in Journey know something about singing?
Old 3rd August 2014 | Show parent
  #103
Lives for gear
 
Akoppenheffer's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Blue's "Pop" is the best I've used.
Old 3rd August 2014 | Show parent
  #104
Gear Guru
 
FFTT's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Depends on your outlook, but sometimes it makes more sense to spend the extra $200.00 on the lady who lets you use her panty hose as a pop filter :-)
Old 3rd August 2014 | Show parent
  #105
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg ➡️
Because there are just as many examples of vocalists who did well singing close to the mic as there of vocalists who did well singing farther away from the mic...
Studio acoustics make a massive difference in how far a singer can be from the mike without losing presence. Avoiding inverse square law issues can eliminate the need for vocal compression.
Old 3rd August 2014 | Show parent
  #106
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Willett ➡️
… if you *have* to sing close to the mic because you want a large proximity effect - *then* it's better to maximise the filter to mic distance and sing close to the filter.
Maybe what we need is a filter we can hang on the singer, not the mic :-)
Old 3rd August 2014
  #107
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
I tried to get te last singer to wear a nylon stocking over her head ... Unfortunately she put it on before coming to sing and had to make a stop at the liqour store for some smokes ... Well, needless to say, she was late, but she did get the smokes for free

I tried the metal ones and have a small and large version (stedman with louvers) but most times prefer to have the singer at an angle to the mic .. Just put up an SM7 and have them use that as the place to sing to and then angle a LDC so it dies not catch the blast of mouth turbulence. But a stocking can be just fine most times. New ones, not borrowed ..
Old 3rd August 2014 | Show parent
  #108
Gear Guru
 
FFTT's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I thought you only needed one recording pop music?
Old 4th August 2014 | Show parent
  #109
Gear Addict
 
Sgalb's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by FFTT ➡️
I thought you only needed one recording pop music?
Old 5th August 2014
  #110
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Sooooo...does the Blast Pad come with a gooseneck? I'm torn between the Pauly and Pete's Place. My custom u47 handles siblance great but is still prone to pressure. The gooseneck on the Pauly almost has me sold but the Blast Pad may be what I need...how does it mount to your mic stand?
Old 5th August 2014 | Show parent
  #111
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
You can use a goose neck or mount it to your stand.
I have a goose neck on a few stands that I use them on and I have a couple clamps that I can clamp on a stand and use a goose neck.

I think if you look at the Blast Pad there would be no doubt in your mind as to which you would buy.

The quality and durability of the Blast Pad SPL filter is unsurpassed by anything and buy a very long slot in my humble opinion.
Old 16th August 2014
  #112
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Just ordered mine...about to shoot it out against a Pauly...
Old 16th August 2014 | Show parent
  #113
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
congrats!
When you get it in your hands, I believe you will be surprised with the quality!

Old 17th August 2014
  #114
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Just arrived. This thing is built like a tank. Not delicate at all like the Pauly. Both screens are some sort of metal mesh. Judging by just the "blow" test...it definitely filters more air than the Pauly. I will put it to the vocal test soon as I get a minute. So any suggestions on a gooseneck sturdy enough to support this thing?

Last edited by Twenty Staxx; 17th August 2014 at 02:20 AM.. Reason: left out some details
Old 17th August 2014 | Show parent
  #115
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twenty Staxx ➡️
Just arrived. This thing is built like a tank. Not delicate at all like the Pauly. Both screens are some sort of metal mesh. Judging by just the "blow" test...it definitely filters more air than the Pauly. I will put it to the vocal test soon as I get a minute. So any suggestions on a gooseneck sturdy enough to support this thing?
I just grab what ever sweet water had on sale and it has never been an issue.

Also on the blast pad, is designed to tame very high spl levels, this means mic's that you may not have otherwise been able to use in some setting, you may now use them in those applications.

A mic manufacture, when ask what is the number one reason for failure with a mic capsule, simple stated, when I get one back, Marshall is imprinted on it, then laughed. That will NOT be an issue when using the blast pad.

A lot of companies have somewhat copied what I did with it, but none have come close to achieving what the Blast pad SPL filter delivers.

Have fun, when you done letting someone slobber all in it, toss it in sink wash it rinse and let it dry: )~ . Rock and roll!
thanks pan



Old 7th September 2014 | Show parent
  #116
Gear Nut
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twenty Staxx ➡️
Just arrived. This thing is built like a tank. Not delicate at all like the Pauly. Both screens are some sort of metal mesh. Judging by just the "blow" test...it definitely filters more air than the Pauly. I will put it to the vocal test soon as I get a minute. So any suggestions on a gooseneck sturdy enough to support this thing?
Did you try the Blast Pad on vocals?
Old 20th May 2015 | Show parent
  #117
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
hakan vs rycote open cell pop filter

Quote:
Originally Posted by doncaparker ➡️
For those in the US who are curious about the Hakan pop filter, Rycote sells a similar type of pop filter; similar in that they both use open cell foam, sort of like the material one sees in a washable furnace filter. I own a Rycote, and I like it a lot. You can buy a Rycote in the US more easily than you can buy a Hakan.
the hakan pop filter is 20mm thick - there is no info on rycote website as to how thick their version is but it looks a lot thinner from the photos & I wonder if it is adequate to protect a 1.5 micron ribbon - can anyone comment as to whether the thicker hakan filter would offer sufficient protection for a Samar AL 39 which has a ribbon thickness of only 1.5 microns or whether a K & M type dual layer nylon mesh type filter is needed for better protection even though this dual layer nylon type definitely dulls the sound in comparison to Hakan p110 opencell foam pop filter
Old 20th May 2015
  #118
Lives for gear
 
mbvoxx's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Stedmans get used on every mic here except the TM250 which has a Pearlman pop filter and the U47FET which has a BLUE "the Pop".
Old 20th May 2015 | Show parent
  #119
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionalanalogue ➡️
the hakan pop filter is 20mm thick - there is no info on rycote website as to how thick their version is but it looks a lot thinner from the photos & I wonder if it is adequate to protect a 1.5 micron ribbon - can anyone comment as to whether the thicker hakan filter would offer sufficient protection for a Samar AL 39 which has a ribbon thickness of only 1.5 microns or whether a K & M type dual layer nylon mesh type filter is needed for better protection even though this dual layer nylon type definitely dulls the sound in comparison to Hakan p110 opencell foam pop filter
The Rycote foam is less than half the thickness of the Håkan - the Håkan is 20mm thick, the Rycote is 8mm thick - I have them both side by side.

If I blow as hard as I can into the foam with my hand about 50mm (2") behind the foam - I can feel some of the blast through the Rycote, but feel nothing through the Håkan.

I took a quick iPhone photo of the two foams side by side - not very good, but should give you some idea.

There is supposed to be a dealer in the US selling the Håkan, but I'm afraid I don't know who it is. You can get the Håkan via the UK quite easily and quickly.

.
Attached Thumbnails
Best Pop Filter-foams.jpg  
Old 27th August 2015
  #120
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Singers hat. No pops or proximity issues. $4.99 new on ebay.

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