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Man they sang out of tune back in the day too!
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #91
Gear Maniac
 
mattssons's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I think you got it all wrong!

Just picture yourself listening to all those tracks that you find out of tune all in "perfect" artificial "non human" perfect pitch. Read my lipz "BORING" Ok i´m drunk at this hour but don´t we all like the "Human factor " the one that makes it real " it could have been me" factor, the chair moving, the door opening, the grump, the hiss, the grind, the cough. It might be subconsious, but darn i LOVE those things! /Toby
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #92
Gear Guru
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
I'd like to teach the past to sing
in perfect harmony
I'd like to auto-tune their stuff
like they do today
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #93
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3rd&4thT's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Microtones are deliberate!

I've been reading about Howlin' Wolf, the great blues singer who helped birth rock music. Sam Philips discovered Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis, but always considered the Wolf his greatest discovery.

Anyway, I found the following passage by Gordon MacGregor on Bluesnet:

"It is maintained by some blues writers that Delta Blues artists, of which (Howlin') Wolf is an example, came from a tribe in Africa which communicates microtonally, that is, in harmonic increments that are smaller than those in the European 12 tone scale. In addition to the polyrhythmic playing, it is what sets these blues apart not only from other types of music but also from other types of blues. The feeling produced can often be very eerie and "magical" as if the music somehow escapes time and the harmonic constraints of European music."

I'm in no hurry to commit to that 100% right away, but even if it's only half true, it would account for the problem under discussion - that a LOT more rock musicians than we think were influenced by Delta Blues, and that singing and playing "out of tune" can be powerfully expressive.

Cheers.
3rd&4thT
Attached Files
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #94
Kush Audio
 
u b k's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by taturana ➡️
i say be brave and be pitchy!

thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup


gregory scott - 'ubk'
.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #95
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ricfoxx's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
auto-tune is like anything else. Not good not bad...its what you do with it that can make it downright evil. Ive seen some people draw in steps
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #96
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🎧 15 years
When you are talking about past artists being able to sing or not it doesn't really mean much to reference the people of the '70s.
The cat was well out of the bag by then and it was definitely a few years into the "anything goes" era.

The problem today is that they are auto-tuning melody lines that are so mind numbingly simple!
The intervals involved in the melodies today are so simple and yet they need to be auto-tuned!

In pre-60's popular music the melodies themselves required you to have a decent ear for pitches.
Ask someone to sing "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" or "Willow Weep" today.
Those were standards and everyone sang them in the day.
Today's average singer couldn't even four measures into "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" before missing pitches and with "Willow Weep" most people most likely would miss the second note!
Those elusive 6ths and stuff!

Back in the day they didn't even consider the people that couldn't sing or play well.
Back in those times as long as people looked fairly decent, but could sing or play well they were in.
Now, if they LOOK GOOD they can be made to sound acceptable.

I have a question James...
Do you make your students work on interval training?
If it is going to be auto-tuned then it really is a waste of time.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #97
Gear Guru
 
theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
"Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" is a mofo to simply remember the melody of, let alone get right...

Listen to the Platters' version. It shows how they keep equal temp instruments out of the way (pizz harp, staccato piano, and buried at that) and the strings, with their ability to hit just pitches providing a comforting, in-tune harmonic bed for the vocal melodies. You can see how much the 'equal temperament dilemma' shaped the arrangement of this and other songs where the singers were going to be singing true intervals rather than the crude approximations imposed by equal temperament instruments.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #98
Gear Addict
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by James 'LA' Lugo ➡️
Is it with lazy engineers and producers who fell in love with the use of autotune?
I think at least part of the problem today is we have this ridiculous standard that says that every single note sung (and, for that matter, every note played) has to be absolutely spot on pitch. No one today is willing to work with a singer who likes to be a bit sharp to stand out from the backing, or slides into higher notes a bit, or just has a unique sense of pitch. Whereas, in the past when pitch correction was a lot more difficult (playing games with the playback speed while bouncing), there was more emphasis on getting a take with the right vocal character for the song, and not quite so much on whether each note is within 0.1 Hz of perfect pitch. To sum it up, a lot of the time, producers are calling for Autotune when they don't have to.

Rodger Waters, to name one, could not sing on pitch if his life depended on it. But he knew his stengths and limitations as a singer, and he knew how to make it work. Jon Anderson was a major note cheater; he slid into a lot of notes, and he had an intuitive understanding of how to back-mask passing flat notes. But even if Autotune had existed then, no producer or label moron would have dared suggest using it on him.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #99
Gear Guru
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
i say be brave and be pitchy!
If being pitchy means being brave, then I'm a Super Hero at my level of pitchiness.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #100
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voicegenius's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Roddey ➡️
If being pitchy means being brave, then I'm a Super Hero at my level of pitchiness.
that was a good one! Good thread!

Bump
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #101
Sky
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Sky's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by popmann ➡️
I think you're way off base here. Don't mix familiarity with quality. Roberta Flack, in the day, would lay waste to CORRECTED Britney. Let alone sans Autotune. Linda Rondstat? Could there BE a more perfect female singer? Can you tell me someone now with the world of digital correction that can "bring it" like that?
KD Lang?

Sky
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #102
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popmann's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Sure. Are you suggesting that KD Lang uses AT? Or that she even gained popularity in this era? I was selling her CDs 20 years ago when I worked in retail music stores. Sure, she's newer than Linda...but, AT is newer than her. No?

My original point was that none of the new "corrected" singers are as good as the better singers prior to pitch correction. Yet, it's assumed that it's needed.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #103
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
AT has turned into a means to get a sound that is popular.
If anything it shows the true goal of a pop song is TO SELL UNITS and not to sound "good."
The goal is to make the song SOUND popular.
Popular is now that idiot AT sound.

The ONLY redeeming value of shows like American Idol is that the people are generally singing without AT.
At least people hear actual people singing without the sound being doctored to death on those shows.

The problem is that AT becomes a standard and people get used to hearing it!
Average people initially develop their ear hearing popular music and younger people tend to listen to what is current.
A whole bunch of the new talent hears an awful lot of AT music.
Unless, they are around a choir setting or hearing a lot of live music (hopefully w/o AT used!) they don't get to hear a lot of music that isn't AT'd to death!

Still, there IS hope!
I recently did production for three area high school choirs and all had great, young talent.
They all had kids that sang nice solos and were strong vocalists that sing properly.
In particular, there was a boy that sang Nina Simone's "Feeling Good" and it was stunningly good.
Also, a young girl sung "Taylor the Latte Boy" and she made my eyes mist up at both rehearsal and performance time!

The AT sound will pass.
Please God, LET IT GO AWAY!

I'd take back the gated snare sound!
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #104
Here for the gear
 
Torchlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by James 'LA' Lugo ➡️
I hear ya, I think it's a knee jerk reaction to all the generalizations that fly around here every day. I'm a voice coach, I listen to all types of music morning, noon and night and sing and teach everything. My statement was what it was. I don't think everyone back then was out of tune, that's not what I said, I said a lot of it was out of tune and it is to my ear and if they were around now a days with the climate they'd be tuned.

Peace
I totally agree with this statement. These days, I think we have a very high ideal as to what we expect from singers. Singers are no different than they always were. Some are great, some suck. As a singer, it drives me crazy that more singers don't actually get themselves a vocal coach and learn how to actually sing in pitch, with good technique, BUT there are many many singers that blow me away every day, not just on disc, where everything is autocorrected, but also LIVE, where there is no auto correction. And let's be honest here, depending on your genre, if you want to have a competitive album, there is going to be auto-correction on your CD, it's not really a question of either being good enough to not have it, or bad enough to need it. I will say this, my CD was put though melodyne, and I am happy with it. But can I bring it live? Yes.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #105
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
OK I'll bite but its a troll thread to get things stirred up. Though I seen a couple comments on economics (label economics) but nobody has looked at the big picture of economics as the root cause of the diminished talent pool. James is putting songs together for his wedding, not hiring a band to play. He is far from alone on this as we don't have the money, just as venues/bars/promoters/etc. don't have the money to hire bands. Musicians including singers learn by working live and no amount of woodshedding replaces playing with other musicians in front of a crowd. When a singer is working live gigs if they suck they got weeded out for the most part or at least due to an embarassing performance they had the motivation to get better. Today you get a dancer/has to look good on video kid with no or little real world experience who is manufactured into a label singer thru a marketing campain. Given that, we are lucky there are even a few that can sing. Live playing shaped many of the singers we consider treasures today (including the out of tune Dylan - took alot of years of gigging and a few incarnations of his sound/style to come up with the Dylan that became a hit) and current economics are clearly killing that honing process. Hopefully the public wises up and starts voting with their wallets to NEVER go to lip synced performances. Hopefully the public wises up that when they go out for a beer they go out to a club that supports live music and not a jukebox. Hopefully the public wises up and when picking which town festivals to see, they pick the ones that hire bands. Hopefully the economy turns quickly and more people can afford the luxury of a live band for their weddings. Hopefully musicians can start earning a living wage playing live music instead of it being a low paying part time job. I'm sure most if not all on this board already vote with our wallets this way, so the next step is to convince the people around us to do the same and so forth just by telling them if they want better acts, this is what they have to do. Hard not to see the big picture is economics.

As for walking the talk, friends of ours from England came in town last weekend for a visit and we took them to Buddy Guy's Legends blues club in Chicago for food and drinks. The warmup band was "Burnside" which had the vocalist-lead guitarist Kent Burnside, one of the many musician grandsons of famous bluesman R.L Burnside. If you get a chance to catch his band when they come to your town see him, it will be a treat of great pulse driven blues (think they play Memphis alot). Their rhythm guitarist was playing a third finger metal slide thru the Orange amp with the bulldozer on it and got a sound like a blues harmonica playing riffs behind the lead. First time I've ever seen somebody pull that trick off.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #106
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lame pseudonym's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
"Or maybe your ear is so acclimated to the inharmonic intervals of equal temperament that when you hear a natural, in-tune interval sung by a singer who actually knows where the notes are instead of blindly following the sometimes rather crude approximations of ET, your ear doesn't get it."

Ya know, I have to tune the daylights out of my voice, and believe me I put in the practice time. But auto doesn't sound good, and I only use it like spellcheck. Most times I have to go back and untune some notes to make it all sound right.


LP
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #107
Sky
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Sky's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by popmann ➡️
Sure. Are you suggesting that KD Lang uses AT? Or that she even gained popularity in this era? I was selling her CDs 20 years ago when I worked in retail music stores. Sure, she's newer than Linda...but, AT is newer than her. No?

My original point was that none of the new "corrected" singers are as good as the better singers prior to pitch correction. Yet, it's assumed that it's needed.
Perhaps I misunderstood your point. Are you comparing only marginal modern singers who need correction against exceptional classic singers who don't? Yes the exceptional singer is going to sound better, correction or not.

But a more fair comparison is against exceptional modern singers who record without AT in the digital age. Then I would absolutely put KD Lang in the same league as Roberta Flack, along with Norah Jones, Jane Monheit and Jennifer Hudson. Of course I'm assuming no one I've mentioned uses AT.

Sky
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #108
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SkunkWorks's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by maq ➡️
There will always be a generational condescension.
snip
Alot of stuff I hear moaning about on this board I heard 10 years ago... and 10 years before that... and my parents did it, and their parents and parent's parents probably did too. I will be hearing the same moaning 10 years from now and 10 years after that. I was almost going to say that at that point I'll probably be one of the ones doing the moaning... but I actually kind of doublt it... I'm the same age as James, have been around for the 60's, 70's, 80's and 90's stuff and I guess I kind of roll with the punches and whatever the flavor of the year or decade happens to be as far as singing, music, mixing and mastering styles always seems to grow on me and I always find myself diggin' the current state of affairs.

And I think I'm actually lucky that way... that I get to listen to and actually enjoy the hell out of all sorts of new stuff rather than pining for it to sound like stuff from another era.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #109
Sky
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Sky's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Torchlight ➡️
I totally agree with this statement. These days, I think we have a very high ideal as to what we expect from singers. Singers are no different than they always were. Some are great, some suck. As a singer, it drives me crazy that more singers don't actually get themselves a vocal coach and learn how to actually sing in pitch, with good technique, BUT there are many many singers that blow me away every day, not just on disc, where everything is autocorrected, but also LIVE, where there is no auto correction. And let's be honest here, depending on your genre, if you want to have a competitive album, there is going to be auto-correction on your CD, it's not really a question of either being good enough to not have it, or bad enough to need it. I will say this, my CD was put though melodyne, and I am happy with it. But can I bring it live? Yes.
Great points Torch. Bad AT says as much about engineering craft as singing craft. Regardless, the glitchy sound is marketed as a desired feature because it takes too much effort to either sing it right, or get a natural sound from the tools.

Great singers don't really need correction, but for them a little correction is probably undetectable and easy to apply.

In watching Susan Boyle's latest Britain's Got Talent performance, I was impressed by how warmly it was received despite being a bit pitchy. She received another standing ovation from the audience and judges and sailed into the finals.

Sky
Old 25th May 2009
  #110
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Meh, I think most people who think "Back then they were talented!" have this entire old music > new music mindset. Which is just plain ********(read:narrow-minded).

Who cares who uses AT really, a record is meant to sound as good as it possibly can, which means if you can fix someone's mistakes you do it, you don't go "Oh but he/she can't do it live so I won't fix it". I wouldn't do it just because it's my "job", I just want the record to sound good for myself.

Also, if someone make a few mistakes here and there, and AT is used and is not noticeable I don't see what's the big deal. It's just like any other tool, you don't see people complaining about compressors and going "Oh man, he/she can't control the volume of his voice, what a loser!" However, I understand why AT is "criminalized" because of it's ridiculously obvious use in many commercial recordings.

On another note, I don't really enjoy these "perfect" performances by people like Beyonce and what not, it really just bores the hell out me to be honest. I mean, it's like you could watch her perform 40 times and it'd be the exact same thing over and over and over and over again, everything is planned from the dancing to the lights to the movements on stage. Why not just get a robot to do it really.
I'm gonna go on a little ramble here.
I don't think you have to be talented to play music, you just need the heart and soul, as cliched as it sounds. I'd rather watch a slightly pitchy singer who just loses himself in the music as opposed to some american idolesque singer stand there and sing everything perfectly but on an emotional level it's just so shallow. Not to say all good singers are like that, but in the context of the mainstream media it's pretty much like that all around. Plenty of good singers who pour their hearts into the music.

ok i've rambled enough
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #111
Here for the gear
 
Torchlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkunkWorks ➡️
Alot of stuff I hear moaning about on this board I heard 10 years ago... and 10 years before that... and my parents did it, and their parents and parent's parents probably did too. I will be hearing the same moaning 10 years from now and 10 years after that.
~laughing~ SO true. It's the old "kids these days" crap that never seems to go away. While I myself am DEFINITELY guilty of bitching about bad singers and have been known to rant about talentless people who can't even sing blah blah blah, sometimes it's helpful to take a step back and realize that while that can be true, there are also TONS of talented people who CAN sing. When I listen to my favorite singers, they are far from perfect, but that is what makes their voices unique and beautiful. It's the spaces in between that are soulful.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #112
Here for the gear
 
Torchlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiftiey ➡️

Who cares who uses AT really, a record is meant to sound as good as it possibly can, which means if you can fix someone's mistakes you do it, you don't go "Oh but he/she can't do it live so I won't fix it". I wouldn't do it just because it's my "job", I just want the record to sound good for myself.

On another note, I don't really enjoy these "perfect" performances...
Yes...yes...yes!

Perfect = yawn. When was anything ever perfect and why do we require this as an ideal? Sometimes it is the imperfection, the notion of asymmetry, that is most interesting and thought-provoking. Like a tree that is twisted by the wind, a performance that is shaped by it's environment, by the energy in the room, is far more dazzling and memorable than perfectly timed banter and perfectly on pitch notes. Sure, it's important to practice and work towards betterment, but no matter what it is passion that ALWAYS wins the performance.

When I was a kid, I would compete in this piano festival every year. Once, I played my piece as heartfelt as I could, and this girl got up and played some freaking Rachmaninoff concerto that was technically flawless. I figured she would have it, as her song was clearly much more difficult and technically perfect. The adjudicator got up and said to her "do you know what this song is about?". When she shook her head, he went ahead and explained it to us. She didn't place. I did and it was a lesson I NEVER forgot. Technical perfection is meaningless. Feeling the music, finding the soul of it, that's what matters.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #113
Sky
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1 Review written
🎧 15 years
In my previous post I mentioned "bad AT", which I define as correction applied with the intent of hiding a bad performance (like a bad toupe or comb-over ), rather than AT applied deliberately for effect (like Imogen Heap, Hide and Seek).

Compelling vocalists like Jagger know how to make their rough voices work for them so there's nothing to hide.

Sky
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #114
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Torchlight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky ➡️
In my previous post I mentioned "bad AT", which I define as correction applied with the intent of hiding a bad performance (like a bad toupe or comb-over ), rather than AT applied deliberately for effect (like Imogen Heap, Hide and Seek).

Compelling vocalists like Jagger know how to make their rough voices work for them so there's nothing to hide.

Sky
~laugh~ For sure. And ya, I listen to the radio sometimes and honestly cringe at how soulless the overuse of correction is for vocalists. Some songs sound as if a robot is singing them ~laugh~. It's especially bad on female vocalists for some reason. Seems to be the reality these days. It's all about moderation....finding the balance between making a great performance even better and keeping the life and magic in the music.
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #115
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OliverV's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
check this out - she's around a quarter tone sharp at 1:22

YouTube - Pink Floyd - Mademoiselle Nobs
Old 25th May 2009 | Show parent
  #116
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feck's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I agree, most old commercial recordings have plenty of pitch issues which in today's climate would generally need to be pitched. I think the real issue is that back then, people were just used to it because they didn't have an alternative. Now that most pop is totally pitched, the average ear has acclimated to it and now anything that is as far off as most stuff used to be just sounds wrong. The same as when the Model-T came out, 20mph was considered really fast - today, since we have cars much faster, that isn't generally acceptable any more. Technology moves forward, and so does the average perception point of music. Take any of us who are musicians, for example - the first recordings we ever made/played on excited the hell out of us, but they were full of flaws/imperfections. But we didn't notice or care. The more seasoned we get, the more we demand of ourselves in our accuracy/quality/etc. This is the natural evolution of improvement. It comes at a cost - we pay more attention to details, sometimes to the detriment of the music, sometimes not. I also agree that the "good old days" theory is usually a bunch of rose-colored-glasses nostalgia. While there certainly were great musicians in the past, there are great ones now as well, they just excel at different things. Generally being able to punch-in/re-record like everyone can now makes the ability to nail it the first time more rare, but opens up new possibilities/talents as well. Everything changes, that is all we can be sure of....
Old 26th May 2009 | Show parent
  #117
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
It depends on what floats yer boat I guess...

I completely agree that autotune sucks the emotion out of a vocal delivery.
I am not going to pick on him in particular, but I listened to the two examples of production on FECK's website.
That style of flat emotional delivery might as well have AT on it because the delivery is flat emotionally in the first place.
That's OK because that is the style you were boviously going for.
The production is fine on both cuts.
With that style of vocal I don't know if the vocal is intended to have that delivery or if AT dictates that the vocals sound that way.

I just don't LIKE that vocal style.
I don't work with people who desire to sound that way.

Most people I know came up the old-school way where they sing the **** in tune.
Yeah, they punch in, but the emotion is there.

I was cutting a :60 second radio spot with my wife this morning.
We were in a hurry and although she is a real deal singer with a degree in voice from a prestigious music school, we could have completed the whole thing quicker if we used auto tune.
The problem... we didn't want the vocal to sound like an auto-tuned vocal.
Thusly, we punched in parts.
Old 26th May 2009 | Show parent
  #118
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hollywood_steve's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
mean it's rock-n-roll how much rehearsing can anyone do, it's four chords, count to 4 and do it over again. I could be wrong

Um...... once upon a time there was a soul / R&B singer named James Brown. Back in the early 60s (before his music got more complex due to hard funk), his music was primarily the same three chord arrangements as the other million blues/rock/soul/surf bands. But James' band was better for many reasons (talent, taste, etc.) but a large part of their tremendous success came from endless rehearsals where every part of their hour set was rehearsed to perfection.

Then there was that band from Liverpool who readily admit tha much of their success came from the 60 to 80 hours per week (!!!) that they played on stage during their time in Hamburg. Those daily marathon sets turned them from a garage rock band into a tight, professional rock and roll band capable of playing tightly, singing in tune, while putting on an exciting show.

I have never met any kind of rock band that would not benefit from more rehearsal; and many of the best bands I have ever seen (live) became that good either through 8hr per day rehearsals or 7 night per week, three sets per night of live shows. The time has to be put in; either in your rehearsal space or in a series of sleazy bars - the secret to success is no secret - hours and hours of playing/rehearsing. And especially in rock and roll, where a bad attitude is part of the image, some of the wildest, trashiest bands kept their 8hr per day rehearsal schedules quiet as it would conflict with their carefully tailored image for not caring.
Old 26th May 2009 | Show parent
  #119
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vincentvangogo's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I have a theory that I call Consistent Ramshackleness which states that any level of amateurism in art can be made to work, so long as all the elements are approximately equal in their level of amateurism/ramshackleness.
As an example: Dylan's singing and harmonica playing on 'Like A Rolling Stone' is technically all over the place, but because most of the other instruments are also a bit out of tune and out of time, the ramshackleness was consistent and therefore the whole thing made for a very satisfying whole. Early Velvet Underground is another example of equally maintained ramshackleness. However the moment you' improve' one element (as the Velvets did when they brought in Doug Yule,) it suddenly ups the ante and you either have to go with it (which the Velvets managed to do on Loaded) or else you have a horrible ramshackleness mismatch that makes even the more professional elements sound bad (Dylan in the 80's.)
This CR principal can be applied to all artforms and any element within them eg one improvised scene in an otherwise scripted film will make everything look a mess, (take note Robin Williams.)
So that's why in days gone by people could be technically out yet still sound great, and why the more people use click tracks, quantizing, etc the more they're obliged to use Autotune etc to take it to the same level of 'perfection.'
Old 26th May 2009 | Show parent
  #120
js1
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Where the autotune grousing comes from is that there are people today with careers that do not have talent. They have connections, they have looks, but vocal talent? In the old days, no career. We're not talking Britney, not Christina - they do have talent, and they don't need correction.

But I heard Jennifer Lopez without autotune. It sounded like Leonard Nimoy. Without autotune, she ends up on the next Golden Throats compilation. With autotune, she's #1.

js
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