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Setting Levels - Glyn Johns
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #31
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Matti's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Recordermans is more about phase than levels and GJ´s didn´t care about that, I guess. What I mean, it´s not mono - there have to be level and time differences to make it stereo.
Just try and like it or change some if not

Matti
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #32
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narcoman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
i wanna get back into this bass playing womans 90 foot ass.....
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #33
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aclarson's Avatar
Isn't the point of Glyn Johns to be at a 90 degree angle to eliminate phase issues and to have the snare and kick in the center of the stereo image (or close)? I have used this and recorderman, and I like the sound of GJ better most of the time, especially when blended with a smashed room mic. And I still use a floor tom mic. I space mine a hair further though, the two drumsticks spacing isn't quite enough to keep the drummer from hitting the one over the snare.
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #34
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Matti's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Well I mic by instinct, the hassle of measuring the mics places is just too much
for the drummer to watch...
One for snare, one for kick and Glyn Johns for the rest having the overhead
bit more over the toms & cymbals than snare, and possibly one between kick and snare out front about the same distance as the floor tom "oh" ?

Matti
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #35
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Listen in mono first.
Use whatever distance sounds good in your room.
Too much floor tom? Move it.
Get good phase relationship for kick and snare.
Pan.

I usually keep the main mics fairly tight L-R and use a stereo room mic to make the drums seem wider than they are.
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #36
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The Reel Thing's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MATTI ➡️
When I do Glyn Johns I set the levels by asking the drummer to hit his / her
toms with equal force to see and thats about it

Matti
ouh, sexy...
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #37
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkRB ➡️

But the whole idea of both is that you keep the kick and snare centre of your overheads.
Anyway, way too many of my posts on one thread saying the same over and over. Nighty night all
I'm sorry, but the Glyn Johns method DOES NOT keep the kick equa-distant between the two mics - ONLY (and not necessarily - GS made this part up) the snare. Only the recorderman's technique tries to keep both equa- distant. Ergo, they ARE NOT the same thing. And actually, Glyn had the floor tom mic aiming towards the HH not the snare and also had his OH snare mic positioned between the snare and hi tom and not just over the snare ala recorderman's.

When looking at a mic'd kit the two techniques look RADICALLY different - moreso than co-incident or spaced pair mic set ups. And the difference in sound is quite huge.

---------------
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #38
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Ol' Betsey's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
To be honest, and this is probably a bad thing (?) but I tend use my ears as opposed to checking the meters.

I use a piece of string to get as close as possible to equal distance between kick/snare. I've been doing this long enough to be able to get pretty close eye-balling but it still makes me more comfortable to double-check with string/cable. And yes, this means the shoulder/floor mic looks pretty weird where it eventually gets placed but it definitely sounds good.

Then I'll set my PFL levels via the meters and while flicking between mono/stereo, shift levels ever so slightly until I get things centered and sounding the way I like.

R.

P.S. In theory, the Recorderman/Johns techniques are the same, equidistant mics from the source. In practice and placement they are different. Recorderman focuses on the snare/kick relationship while Johns seemed to be primarily concerned with the snare. IME the kick/low-end shift is more manageable with the Recorderman set-up.
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #39
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swafford's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScumBum ➡️
Ok , so for those who have used the glyn Johns method before , is it the same as recorderman with regard to setting the snare to hit the same level in both Overhead mics?
That's the way i do it. Never had to much tom.
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #40
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Matti's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reel Thing ➡️
ouh, sexy...
ok I can see...

Matti
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #41
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 15 years
It's important to remember that there is no such thing as THE Glyn Johns technique - he was not monolithic in his approach to engineering. He seemed to use the fewest number of microphones possible to get the sound he was after. If it sounded good with one mic, then he would only use one. Sometimes the drums were in mono, sometimes stereo. I don't have the impression that he worried too much if the snare and/or kick were exactly in the center or not, or if he had a matched pair when using two overheads - as long as it sounded good in the end.
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