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is it about the gear or the engineer?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
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SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
is it about the gear or the engineer?

replace "photographer" and "photography" in this video by "audio engineer" / "audio engineering" and you'll know the answer:

Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
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thismercifulfate's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Methinks most bands these days seek out an engineer for a project, rather than a specific studio. The exception are destination studios or establishments like AR or Blackbird. But those tend to have very competent house engineers.

It does remind me of a time I have had a client get lured by an offer by a “buddy” of the guitarist in her band to record at some big name studio in another city with a giant Neve 80-series console for cheap during the midnight shift. Turns out they got stuck with the intern engineering it and they produced a giant pile of burning garbage with the most amazing gear. When the client brought me the multitracks to mix, I was shocked at the mess and I had to explain to her why it was essentially unusable and that she had wasted her time and money. We re-tracked everything at a very modest local studio and got great sounds.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 
🎧 20 years
The engineer matters a lot more than the gear generally speaking, but some gear (and rooms) also have limitations that there’s no getting around. It’s the same with photography - a great photographer can take a great photo with a cell phone camera, given that they know the limitations of the camera, but if what you need is something that can only be done with a high end macro lens for instance, then it is what it is. It’s the same with audio - given reasonably decent gear (and there’s a lot of that around nowadays at pretty modest prices) a great engineer can do a great recording. It’s the sort of fringe situations that require better gear. You can’t get blood from a stone and all that. The engineer might be able to suggest something to mitigate the situation - moving to a different location, renting a better mic or preamp, or what have you. They will understand what the problem is and why the client can’t, say, record a full drum kit in a glass walled room with an SM57 and get a drum sound like early Elvis Costello records. :D So gear does matter and certainly so does room sound. But you still have to know how to use it… you can go into a great studio with the best gear and somebody who doesn’t know what they’re doing is still going to produce crap.

I am glad I learned mostly in really good studios, because that way if something was crap, I knew it was my fault and not the gear.

Last edited by lflier; 2 weeks ago at 05:07 AM..
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #4
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
it isn't about the technician and even less about the gear, but about the composition, arrangement, performance.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #5
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SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
it isn't about the technician and even less about the gear, but about the composition, arrangement, performance.
sorry but video is about the capturing process of a subject or a performance as well as the following editing and post-processing processes (neither about composition, arrangement nor the nature of the performance) and this is where gear does matter. Just have a look at your own pile of not inexpensive gear
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #6
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henryrobinett's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
it isn't about the technician and even less about the gear, but about the composition, arrangement, performance.
Yes. Gear and room are important. But not NEARLY as important as composition, arrangement and performance. Not even in the same solar system of relative importances. That’s why it amazes me people spending such inordinate amounts of time and money, like I have!, on gear instead of practicing 6 hours a day and writing music, for those home studio folk who are musicians.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #7
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1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonicAxiom ➡️
sorry but video is about the capturing process of a subject or a performance as well as the following editing and post-processing processes (neither about composition, arrangement nor the nature of the performance) and this is where gear does matter. Just have a look at your own pile of not inexpensive gear
i stick to my previous statement...

i think many folks overestimate both the role of the equipment and the 'engineer', at least when working with excellent musicians in a professional environment: it's neither about the gear nor the tech - it's about composition, arrangment, performance!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
seedubs's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
This thread is for folks concerned with "gear" and "Engineers" ....not composers and performers. There are other forums for that.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
. . . . it's about composition, arrangment, performance!
. . . in a boxy sounding room with poorly placed microphones and improperly gain-staged preamps. It's totally about engineering . . . and the engineer will do his best work with excellent gear.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
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vernier's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Experienced and talented engineer should get the job done, no matter what.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #11
Lives for gear
 
pencilextremist's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
bit of both, you need a certain standard of quality, a good engineer will get good results out of whatever equipment they work with, but you definitely can't polish a turd, nor can you auto tune your way out of a rubbish vocal take, it's the fakeness that needs to stop if we want to make music great again.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 
drockfresh's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Gear is more like a race car than a tennis racket
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #13
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 
🎧 20 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by henryrobinett ➡️
Yes. Gear and room are important. But not NEARLY as important as composition, arrangement and performance. Not even in the same solar system of relative importances. That’s why it amazes me people spending such inordinate amounts of time and money, like I have!, on gear instead of practicing 6 hours a day and writing music, for those home studio folk who are musicians.
Because for a lot of us, the way things sound is an integral part of the package. You can have a great composition, arrangement and performance and if it doesn’t get over the way you’re hearing it in your head, because some sonic deficiency is in the way, then you’re going to feel your creative vision and/or performance hasn’t been served.

That was actually what got me into engineering in the first place. As a musician and songwriter I was really dissatisfied with the way things sounded in many “budget” studios (and actually even in big studios because of techniques used), particularly drums, which permeate the whole soundfield. If I knew I had a great drummer playing a great kit but the recorded drums sounded wimpy, the whole thing was going to suffer. It just didn’t give me that chill up my spine that the live performance did, and I lacked the technical knowledge to explain why. So it was really important to me to learn.

Likewise if some of your compositions depend on a certain “soundscape”, maybe even a particular environment that inspired you to write the song, you want to figure out how you can evoke that same feeling in a recording.

Last edited by lflier; 2 weeks ago at 08:34 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 
MAXX VADA's Avatar
a good engineer can pull a decent sound with a 4 track cassette , an average engineer can pull a decent sound with really good gear ...

a good engineer with good gear can pull a great sound

an average engineer may falter using a 4 track

so im going with engineer...
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #15
Gear Guru
 
henryrobinett's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier ➡️
Because for a lot of us, the way things sound is an integral part of the package. You can have a great composition, arrangement and performance and if it doesn’t get over the way you’re hearing it in your head, because some sonic deficiency is in the way, then you’re going to feel your creative vision and/or performance hasn’t been served.

That was actually what got me into engineering in the first place. As a musician and songwriter I was really dissatisfied with the way things sounded in many “budget” studios, particularly drums, which permeate the whole soundfield. If I knew I had a great drummer playing a great kit but the recorded drums sounded wimpy, the whole thing was going to suffer. It just didn’t give me that chill up my spine that the live performance did, and I lacked the technical knowledge to explain why. So it was really important to me to learn.

Likewise if some of your compositions depend on a certain “soundscape”, maybe even a particular environment that inspired you to write the song, you want to figure out how you can evoke that same feeling in a recording.
Well sure. But for me by small degrees. I’ve heard music I think is phenomenal but was recorded poorly and mixed terribly. But somehow the music still came through. Otoh I’ve heard crappy music that sounds great. But I don’t care. I’m not going to listen to it. It’s crap at the source. Obviously the best is both worlds. And yes that’s why I got into doing it as well. But gear and engineering has big as they are will never supplant my desire to create actual music. I don’t see it as music = gear. Different things.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 
drockfresh's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
More crap music has been made on high end gear than good music made on low end gear. Those pro studios in the 80s and 90s churning out polished junk for the labels.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #17
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SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
i stick to my previous statement...

i think many folks overestimate both the role of the equipment and the 'engineer', at least when working with excellent musicians in a professional environment: it's neither about the gear nor the tech - it's about composition, arrangment, performance!
Feel free to stick with it as long as you want but composition, arrangement and performance have simply nothing to do with the technical process of capturing, editing and processing audio which is the task of an audio engineer. This is exactly the point which gets missed in virtually every similar discussion. We are talking about technical stuff (gear) here because this is the realm of the engineer.

As an engineer, you have plenty ways to influence the quality of a recording but you specifically have no influence at all by picking any type of gear or software on the quality of the composition, the arrangement or the performance. The engineer's task is to set everything up technically to get the actual performance captured in the best possible quality. This requires gear - the better, the better. The technical process of capturing a performance has nothing to do with the nature or quality of the performance itself. Aspects like composition are irrelevant when considering the technical creation process of a recording. The engineer supervises it and is responsible for the techical quality of the recorded material but neither is he responsible for the composition, the arrangement nor the singers performance! For the recording to be of the highest quality, he will use the best possible equipment he can lay his hands on since not any equipment will yield the same results!

Regardless the quality of composition, arrangement and performance, the sound quality can still be outstanding from the engineers point of view if he does his job well. He uses mics, pres, eqs, comps etc. (thus, gear). Where's the link between composition, arrangement and the aforementioned gear needed to record/edit and post-process professionally??? There is none. What you are refering to is the subject of an entirely different discussion.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #18
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonicAxiom ➡️
Feel free to stick with it as long as you want but composition, arrangement and performance have simply nothing to do with the technical process of capturing, editing and processing audio which is the task of an audio engineer. This is exactly the point which gets missed in virtually every similar discussion. We are talking about technical stuff (gear) here because this is the realm of the engineer.

As an engineer, you have plenty ways to influence the quality of a recording but you specifically have no influence at all by picking any type of gear or software on the quality of the composition, the arrangement or the performance. The engineer's task is to set everything up technically to get the actual performance captured in the best possible quality. This requires gear - the better, the better. The technical process of capturing a performance has nothing to do with the nature or quality of the performance itself. Aspects like composition are irrelevant when considering the technical creation process of a recording. The engineer supervises it and is responsible for the techical quality of the recorded material but neither is he responsible for the composition, the arrangement nor the singers performance! For the recording to be of the highest quality, he will use the best possible equipment he can lay his hands on since not any equipment will yield the same results!

Regardless the quality of composition, arrangement and performance, the sound quality can still be outstanding from the engineers point of view if he does his job well. He uses mics, pres, eqs, comps etc. (thus, gear). Where's the link between composition, arrangement and the aforementioned gear needed to record/edit and post-process professionally??? There is none. What you are refering to is the subject of an entirely different discussion.
...while i think you started a dicussion on a flawed premise - or you're aiming at a clientele with which i'm indeed out of touch:
i don't record/mix newbie bands in a shithole with crappy gear - under these conditions, an experienced tech can maybe do some amount of damage control and better gear will make his/her job a bit more easy...

...but this still won't turn a lousy composition, arrangement and performance in a platinum selling record! and gear doesn't matter (much) and technicians can get replaced.

the significance and influence of the latter two (gear and tech) can only be considered in individual cases and the evaluation remains controversial, which is why the potential gain in knowledge of the discussion initiated by you imo tends towards zero...
Old 2 weeks ago
  #19
Gear Head
 
definitely the converters
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #20
Gear Addict
 
SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
...while i think you started a dicussion on a flawed premise - or you're aiming at a clientele with which i'm indeed out of touch:
i don't record/mix newbie bands in a shithole with crappy gear - under these conditions, an experienced tech can maybe do some amount of damage control and better gear will make his/her job a bit more easy...

...but this still won't turn a lousy composition, arrangement and performance in a platinum selling record! and gear doesn't matter (much) and technicians can get replaced.

the significance and influence of the latter two (gear and tech) can only be considered in individual cases and the evaluation remains controversial, which is why the potential gain in knowledge of the discussion initiated by you imo tends towards zero...
What flawed premise are you talking about? I'm not aiming at any sort of "clientele". I only posted a video where you can find wonderful on-point analogies regarding the discussion if gear matters or not in a professional environment. No offense but I have the impression you haven't understood what the point of the video is. I'd be happy to clarify. For me, Wolf Amri explains it perfectly for the photography world and you can apply the same rules, factors and arguments he points out to the professional audio world. That's all. I found it surprising and a little bit amusing to learn that photographers are having the same fruitless discussions as audio people, continuously downplaying the relevance and importance of pro gear while hypocritically owning it themselves. Some may not even be aware of that paradox, others probably do it on purpose.

Please name a significant no. of hit songs that have not been recorded using rather expensive pro gear in a top-notch studio (including all music genres). Sure, there are exceptions to the rule but that's what they are: exceptions. 99.9% of all top hits today and in the past (pop, rock, classical, musical, rap, etc.) are/were not recorded in a bedroom using amateur gear and no professional audio engineer / studio owner deliberately misses out on buying the best gear he can afford to be able to offer the best sound quality for the client. Analog and digital high-end gear does not only sound good, it is usually also much more reliable, helps to get a good sounding result faster and can accomplish very specific tasks that cheap gear isnt even capable of accomplishing. Are you seriously questioning any of that? Would it be adequate to ask the artist to compensate for the sub-par signal chain and the lack of engineer's talent by just performing better?

When the recording sessions for a major artist's release is planned, composition, arrangement and performance are usually a non-issue. And then, they will book a studio that is capable of providing top-notch gear to get the production done on a world-class level, without compromise, a studio that has proven to be capable of doing it in the past. A lot of money is involved. No-one will choose to do it in a bedroom on consumer gear (under normal circumstances).

It's all in the video. Watch it again.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #21
Lives for gear
 
pencilextremist's Avatar
 
9 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonicAxiom ➡️
What flawed premise are you talking about? I'm not aiming at any sort of "clientele". I only posted a video where you can find wonderful on-point analogies regarding the discussion if gear matters or not in a professional environment. No offense but I have the impression you haven't understood what the point of the video is. I'd be happy to clarify. For me, Wolf Amri explains it perfectly for the photography world and you can apply the same rules, factors and arguments he points out to the professional audio world. That's all. I found it surprising and a little bit amusing to learn that photographers are having the same fruitless discussions as audio people, continuously downplaying the relevance and importance of pro gear while hypocritically owning it themselves. Some may not even be aware of that paradox, others probably do it on purpose.

Please name a significant no. of hit songs that have not been recorded using rather expensive pro gear in a top-notch studio (including all music genres). Sure, there are exceptions to the rule but that's what they are: exceptions. 99.9% of all top hits today and in the past (pop, rock, classical, musical, rap, etc.) are/were not recorded in a bedroom using amateur gear and no professional audio engineer / studio owner deliberately misses out on buying the best gear he can afford to be able to offer the best sound quality for the client. Analog and digital high-end gear does not only sound good, it is usually also much more reliable, helps to get a good sounding result faster and can accomplish very specific tasks that cheap gear isnt even capable of accomplishing. Are you seriously questioning any of that? Would it be adequate to ask the artist to compensate for the sub-par signal chain and the lack of engineer's talent by just performing better?

When the recording sessions for a major artist's release is planned, composition, arrangement and performance are usually a non-issue. And then, they will book a studio that is capable of providing top-notch gear to get the production done on a world-class level, without compromise, a studio that has proven to be capable of doing it in the past. A lot of money is involved. No-one will choose to do it in a bedroom on consumer gear (under normal circumstances).

It's all in the video. Watch it again.
nope he's right, I've been engineering about 20-25 years and it took over 20 years to realise it's almost all in the music itself and not about gear at all, it doesn't mean that gear doesn't matter, it just means you don't need a 10 thousand pound microphone going into a vintage neve console, if the arrangement and music suck, nothing's going to make it sound good.

I'm also a photographer, been doing it since childhood, it's a different game to audio engineering, I can get great photos out of a crappy phone camera or a DSLR.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #22
Gear Guru
 
henryrobinett's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
It’s the music. And then it comes to performance as well. I can play a simple rhythm guitar part. If it doesn’t fit the groove, forget it. Or perhaps it’s played namby-pamby, without any conviction or energy. No amount eq, aligning, compression, reamping is going to make sit right or make it musical. You can “image” it all you want. You can place it back with less volume, panning and reverb, but I’d it’s played lame it is lame.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #23
Gear Addict
 
SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by pencilextremist ➡️
... it doesn't mean that gear doesn't matter ...
so it does matter then. That's what the video and I also concluded. Everything alse you're talking about is another topic that is also frequently discussed elsewhere. I'm not even arguing against some of your claims. They are just not relevant in this thread. It's sad to see that it's so hard to have people even talk about the same thing. There's no real discussion when there's topic A and repliers are refering to topic B.

I'm not saying that you always have to use $10k mics to get a decent result. But just like any other craftsman a good engineer/ decently equipped recording studio disposes of a decent set of pro-grade tools that is normally not the cheapest stuff if the studio has or wanna get a decent reputation. Pro-grade doesn't automatically mean ultra-expensive! But it means not mediocre or perceivably flawed so that it might ruin or compromise a good performance.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #24
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonicAxiom ➡️
What flawed premise are you talking about? (...)I found it surprising and a little bit amusing to learn that photographers are having the same fruitless discussions as audio people, continuously downplaying the relevance and importance of pro gear while hypocritically owning it themselves. Some may not even be aware of that paradox, others probably do it on purpose.
i recorded/mixed my commercially most successful album with rather modest gear in an okay-ish room: not terribly bad but not great either - it was my band's rehearsal space.
i have no reason to assume that i did my job any better or worse on this album nor were budget or marketing any different - so what made it a success? composition, arrangement and the artist's performance, besides a ton of luck!
kinda ironic that at the time, i already co-owned two studios which were better in every way; the budget however simply didn't allow to track/mix in there...

yes, i do own a ton of very decent gear: all it does is to make my job easier but no one in the world could tell from listening to a fully mixed album or a live mix whether i used my über-gear or just rented any standard gear.
gear is simply not (that) important (except for habit/speed of use) - and not about sound btw: everything that's important in terms of sound happens in front of the mics; the gear is just a bunch of tools and tech is just a messenger...
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #25
Gear Addict
 
SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by henryrobinett ➡️
It’s the music. And then it comes to performance as well. I can play a simple rhythm guitar part. If it doesn’t fit the groove, forget it. Or perhaps it’s played namby-pamby, without any conviction or energy. No amount eq, aligning, compression, reamping is going to make sit right or make it musical. You can “image” it all you want. You can place it back with less volume, panning and reverb, but I’d it’s played lame it is lame.
So either the lame performance has to be recorded again or the sound engineer has to deal with it the best he can (probably using some decent gear for the rescue). Duty of a sound engineer is to get the sound right. Getting the performance right is the talent's task. Deciding whethter a performance was bad and has to be re-recorded or is kept as is is the producer's task. Getting the arrangement right is the arranger's task. Getting the composition right is the composer's task. There may be occasions where all those tasks are combined in a single person, the engineer. I'm not refering to this special situation.

If the talent's performance is bad and it's everything you have you still have to get the sound of it right nonetheless. Performance is the content, audio processing is the packaging. You always wanna have the package look as nice and tempting as possible regardless the quality of the content. That's what the audio engineer has to do and for this he will need some equipment.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #26
Gear Guru
 
henryrobinett's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonicAxiom ➡️
So either the lame performance has to be recorded again or the sound engineer has to deal with it the best he can (probably using some decent gear for the rescue). Duty of a sound engineer is to get the sound right. Getting the performance right is the talent's task. Deciding whethter a performance was bad and has to be re-recorded or is kept as is is the producer's task. Getting the arrangement right is the arranger's task. Getting the composition right is the composer's task. There may be occasions where all those tasks are combined in a single person, the engineer. I'm not refering to this special situation.

If the talent's performance is bad and it's everything you have you still have to get the sound of it right nonetheless. Performance is the content, audio processing is the packaging. You always wanna have the package look as nice and tempting as possible regardless the quality of the content. That's what the audio engineer has to do and for this he will need some equipment.
Of course. But that’s why I’m saying bottom line is the music. If the music is terrible there’s only so far polishing turds can go. The engineer, songwriter, arranger, producer can only do so much. Great musicians can often save a terrible song by transforming the performances and interpretations. Producers can sometimes do that by cutting, pasting, chopping, replacing. But it comes down to the actual music.
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  #27
Gear Addict
 
SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
i recorded/mixed my commercially most successful album with rather modest gear in an okay-ish room: not terribly bad but not great either - it was my band's rehearsal dpace.
i have no reason to assume that i did my job any better or worse on this album nor were budget or marketing any different - so what made it a success? composition, arrangement and the artist's performance, besides a ton of luck!

kinda ironic that at the time, i already co-owned two studios which were better in every way; the budget however simply didn't allow to track/mix in there...

yes, i do own a ton of very decent gear: all it does is to make my job easier but no one in the world could tell from listening to a fully mixed album or a live mix whether i used my über-gear or just rented any standard gear.

gear is simply not (that) important (except for habit/speed of use) - and not about sound btw: everything that's important in terms of sound happens in front of the mics; the gear is just a bunch of tools and tech is just a messenger...
I'm sure that the result of your successful album can still be considered entirely pro-sounding. And that's what matters. What does "rather modest gear" mean exactly? Behringer? Warm Audio? Focusrite Clarette? Whatever it is, it's still gear and that's the whole point here. The very fact that you own a ton of decent gear already proves that you wanna make sure to be on the safe side. That's absolutely professional thinking and perfectly smart to do. You might not always use all that gear but you would also not get rid of it because it gives you the comfort a pro craftsman needs to get any type of task done appropriately on a pro level.

Considerations about gear are not always limited to sound quality. Like I mentioned earlier, pro gear is more reliable, less hassle to work with, faster to work with, etc. I understand that perfectly and it's exactly why I invested in a decent analog front-end for my hybrid studio years ago. It's easy to say "I don't need all this stuiff and could easily produce without it." while you have it sitting behind you. You know (like I do) which gear holds up to its expectations and can be relied on in a professional environment day-by-day and which gear doesn't. Disposing of a reliable set of professional tools in a professional studio is not negotiable and nothing to brag about. It's simply an appropriate necessity.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #28
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by kichal ➡️
definitely the converters
…if this is about religion.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #29
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SonicAxiom's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by henryrobinett ➡️
Of course. But that’s why I’m saying bottom line is the music. If the music is terrible there’s only so far polishing turds can go. The engineer, songwriter, arranger, producer can only do so much. Great musicians can often save a terrible song by transforming the performances and interpretations. Producers can sometimes do that by cutting, pasting, chopping, replacing. But it comes down to the actual music.
I perfectly undestand all of this and you are perfectly right. Only thing is: This discussion is not intended to be about making good music, composition, arrangements or performances but making something SOUND GOOD, whatever it might be and whatever inherent performance quality it might have!

Also, audio engineering is far more than just recording music in a nicely designed and equipped studio. I'm thinking of audio engineering in general here (speech recording, live audio, audio restauration, field recording, podcasting, audio books, voice-dubbing for videos, etc.). You can't always choose what material to work with so - apart from your knowledge - you most probably have to rely on some sort of gear to help you making the best out of what you got or to even get the job done at all. You can't record the next Boston Symphony Orchestra CD with an iPhone.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #30
Lives for gear
 
drockfresh's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Workflow is probably more important that gear
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