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Tools that speed up your workflow
Old 10th January 2018
  #31
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn ➡️
If I did more mixing of other people's recordings than I do, I'd probably want Auto-align handy, or at least to demo it and see what it does. Seems like most of the time when someone sends me 12 tracks of drums I wind up using 3. It'd be 4 if one of them was "Less Hi Hat."
I’ve thought about checking it out, but as you say it’s often better to ditch stuff. Sometimes I’ll try the Little Labs phase adjuster, but rarely do I have a problem - maybe I’m just lucky I don’t have to mix really badly recorded drums! The one project I DO have to mix bad recordings, it’s so bad nothing will save it (hard gated, distorted close mics etc) so sample replacement is the only option

Quote:
Originally Posted by Khaleesi ➡️
Thanks for this! I was already confused by the matter. since I always end up with like 15db of headroom on the mix bus when my mix is finished haha. What is the best way to approach this? Should I go for RMS instead of peak around -20 then? Since I'm planning to buy the defaulter plugin I talked about (only used the demo but it's expired now). and there you can set the clip gain level to a desired RMS or Peak level.

And in regards to prepping, I agree! Mix prep is so important and often overlooked. I love the famous Abraham Lincoln quote "Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe". having said that, if you give me some nice sharpening tools that fasten the process without sacrificing the quality of the work. I'd rather be done in four hours instead of six..



Haha yes and turn off GS especially. On google chrome I have an extension called "newsfeed eradicator" which disables facebook's endless newsfeed and replaces it with a motivational quote, while I can still use all the stuff facebook is actually useful for..



Nice!
Just don’t obsess over levels - aim for ball park but don’t be afraid to adjust thresholds. It’s only really too loud if it’s clipping or you’ve got the fader right down and it’s still too much - or you can’t back the compressor threshold off far enough. Use the meters as a guide only. In PT I’d go for steady state signals into the top part of green, peaks into yellow. That’s about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Boom ➡️
Sorry, I should have been more clear: I no longer *obsess* over mic placement. It’s not a question of laziness, it’s a matter of session flow. If my client is in the zone and wants to try some zany idea their creative energy is not going to evaporate while I fuss with placement for twenty minutes.

And no, I don’t “need” it but the original poster was asking for methods to speed up work flow, and anything that mitigates comb filtering effects as painlessly as Auto-Align is a valuable tool in the kit.
Phew!
Old 10th January 2018
  #32
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
The big items that save me time involves tracking.

When I record with a full band I have the entire studio wired, amps miced and I even bought a set of studio drums.
Drummers setting up their sets and then trying to get it properly miced is by far the biggest time killer. The drums are the foundation to everything else in the mix and since you can only mix to the lowest common denominator, if the drum mix sucks the entire mix sucks.

This is why I have the studio wired for plug and play. Walk in, plug in, and play. Everything's optimally miced and unless I feel the need to do something decent i'm pretty much guaranteed to getting decent tracks that need less mixing. When I do hear something that can be improved I fixing it between sessions where I have time to really work on it and come up with the best options. I use dual amps for guitars and bass to so if the tones from one amp aren't ideal, I can use the other track or blend both.

Solo, The biggest time save are the new amp modeling multi effect units, especially the ones that have switchable instrument level to line level so you can plug in direct. I use them for bass and guitars and its helped reduce mixing time to practically nothing. Before them I's be using things like rack preamp with some effects looped in or using miced amps. Those methods worked but you'd have to wind up doing allot of work getting them to sound like real miced amps. Once the cab modeling was possible it was a huge time saver.

Some of the older rack preamps used simple high and low pass filtering to get rid of the harsh full frequency tones. That helped allot back in the day, but compared to the new cab modeling that uses actual impulses the differences are like day and night. I'm actually by how few are even knowledgeable about this method. I been recording direct like that since the late 70's and I come to a forum like this and the most frequent thing you hear is people recording with a DI, Preamp or trying and failing bit time using some high latency amp software which simply cant do the job in real time as you play.

Its like that old guy in that plays Willie Brown in that movie Crossroads when the kid playing playing on that old acoustic beater. and he says,
Quote:
Look at this old guitar here you been squeakin' on. I bet you saw this thing in a music store and bought it just because you thought it was beat up! Well you got it all wrong. Muddy Waters invented electricity.
Who in their right mind wants to spend hours working their ass off trying to make some lamely recorded track sound like something. Man I program my tones into the multi effects unit so its plug and play. I want to record, I pick my guitar, pick my setting then spend my time playing the best I can. I don't have to worry about how the tracks will sound because I already have that going for me. Then when I mix I only need to dab a little icing on there and then I'm done.

Now it may take a bit of trial and error getting those presets built. You have to try some, compare the results then save the ones that do the best job refining them as you go. You also don't want to bore your listeners to death having the same tones on every song, no matter how good they are so you make temporary changes or simply use different instrument too.

In the end it still comes down to the same thing. Capture great tracks that "don't need no stinking mixing"
Of course they always need a little help but you'd be surprised just how much you can choose to reduce that work.
A good 90 percentage of the problems posted here relate to people trying to fix the issues after the tracks been recorded.

All that's is because they never worked with a primitive recording setup where none of that stuff was possible.
I know this come across like the guy who walked to school uphill both ways but, its true. My first recorders date back to the 60's
and I didn't have any mixers. I'd bounce tracks from one recorder to the other. The original track had to sound great because you
lost fidelity with each bounce and by the second or third bounce it sounded pretty bad so you'd record the instruments that wouldn't suffer from the degeneration first.
I did allot of band recordings too and the only tools you had were mic placement and levels. if you wanted something to sound real hot and be up front you close miced. if you wanted something placed back stage you recorded it with a distant mic. You learn allot using only those basic tools and a passion to record well.
Old 10th January 2018 | Show parent
  #33
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I can see why that approach saves time, but I don’t think either I or the bands I work with would find it very inspiring creatively.

It’s great to have a well tuned kit to call on, a room you know well and some get out of jail free guitar patches to pull out if you’re stuck, but if you work with bands, they generally want their sound, not yours.

This would be an awesome way to work for someone doing large scale library or production music, but not great for a band wanting to get creative or create something new.

It would certainly be efficient!

Quote:
Originally Posted by wrgkmc ➡️
The big items that save me time involves tracking.

When I record with a full band I have the entire studio wired, amps miced and I even bought a set of studio drums.
Drummers setting up their sets and then trying to get it properly miced is by far the biggest time killer. The drums are the foundation to everything else in the mix and since you can only mix to the lowest common denominator, if the drum mix sucks the entire mix sucks.

This is why I have the studio wired for plug and play. Walk in, plug in, and play. Everything's optimally miced and unless I feel the need to do something decent i'm pretty much guaranteed to getting decent tracks that need less mixing. When I do hear something that can be improved I fixing it between sessions where I have time to really work on it and come up with the best options. I use dual amps for guitars and bass to so if the tones from one amp aren't ideal, I can use the other track or blend both.

Solo, The biggest time save are the new amp modeling multi effect units, especially the ones that have switchable instrument level to line level so you can plug in direct. I use them for bass and guitars and its helped reduce mixing time to practically nothing. Before them I's be using things like rack preamp with some effects looped in or using miced amps. Those methods worked but you'd have to wind up doing allot of work getting them to sound like real miced amps. Once the cab modeling was possible it was a huge time saver.

Some of the older rack preamps used simple high and low pass filtering to get rid of the harsh full frequency tones. That helped allot back in the day, but compared to the new cab modeling that uses actual impulses the differences are like day and night. I'm actually by how few are even knowledgeable about this method. I been recording direct like that since the late 70's and I come to a forum like this and the most frequent thing you hear is people recording with a DI, Preamp or trying and failing bit time using some high latency amp software which simply cant do the job in real time as you play.

Its like that old guy in that plays Willie Brown in that movie Crossroads when the kid playing playing on that old acoustic beater. and he says,

Who in their right mind wants to spend hours working their ass off trying to make some lamely recorded track sound like something. Man I program my tones into the multi effects unit so its plug and play. I want to record, I pick my guitar, pick my setting then spend my time playing the best I can. I don't have to worry about how the tracks will sound because I already have that going for me. Then when I mix I only need to dab a little icing on there and then I'm done.

Now it may take a bit of trial and error getting those presets built. You have to try some, compare the results then save the ones that do the best job refining them as you go. You also don't want to bore your listeners to death having the same tones on every song, no matter how good they are so you make temporary changes or simply use different instrument too.

In the end it still comes down to the same thing. Capture great tracks that "don't need no stinking mixing"
Of course they always need a little help but you'd be surprised just how much you can choose to reduce that work.
A good 90 percentage of the problems posted here relate to people trying to fix the issues after the tracks been recorded.

All that's is because they never worked with a primitive recording setup where none of that stuff was possible.
I know this come across like the guy who walked to school uphill both ways but, its true. My first recorders date back to the 60's
and I didn't have any mixers. I'd bounce tracks from one recorder to the other. The original track had to sound great because you
lost fidelity with each bounce and by the second or third bounce it sounded pretty bad so you'd record the instruments that wouldn't suffer from the degeneration first.
I did allot of band recordings too and the only tools you had were mic placement and levels. if you wanted something to sound real hot and be up front you close miced. if you wanted something placed back stage you recorded it with a distant mic. You learn allot using only those basic tools and a passion to record well.
Old 10th January 2018 | Show parent
  #34
Gear Guru
 
🎧 20 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khaleesi ➡️
I was under the impression they had a different layout then normal keyboards.
No they would be shooting themselves in the foot if they tried that! In Pro Tools, if you are in keyboard focus mode, and you press "T", you zoom in. On any keyboard - even the "plain" one that came with your computer. The only difference with the "Pro Tools Keyboard" is that it has a little picture of a magnifying glass with a plus sign printed next to the "T". A visual reminder of the shortcut.

The shortcut exists whether the visual reminder is there or not. Which is why you can use overlays instead of purchasing a separate keyboard for each software.


Quote:
I'll look into it!
you don't have to get a special keyboard, or even the overlays, you can start using the one-key shortcuts today on the keyboard you already have.

Print this out and put it on your desk. Don't forget there are also shortcuts on the numeric pad.
Attached Thumbnails
Tools that speed up your workflow-shortcuts-non-numeric1.jpg  
Old 10th January 2018
  #35
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Meterplugs Perception - automatically level matches a whole plugin chain in a "before-after" manner and of course lets you also bypass the chain to check if the things you do really enhance the signal.
Really really really great.
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