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Electric guitar buzzing when not touching the metal
Old 16th October 2016 | Show parent
  #61
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John Eppstein's Avatar
 
58 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipoff1 ➡️
Thanks for all the responses. Seems to be some conflicting advice, but I think it is in fact a normal issue with my guitar... Fender telecaster (single coils).

I might try the cable I found on line to see that works. It's only $20, so worth a shot, I guess. If anyone's ever tried this thing let me know if it's any good.
guitargrounder.com

Thanks again!!
Telecasters are notorious for noise problems, generally a buzz that is a harmonic of 60 Hz. Try turning around - there should be a particular orientation where the noise is minimized. Also, if you have dimmers anywhere in your wiring, either turn them up all the way or turn them off completely. Dimmer induced buzz is worst between 1/3 and 1/2 dimmer output.
Old 16th October 2016
  #62
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cavern's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I have a Les Paul that does this. Tried to figure out why and never could.
My Duo Jet, Strat and tele don't do this.
Same amp same rig.
Old 19th February 2020 | Show parent
  #63
Here for the gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MickJagger ➡️
This is absolutely incorrect advice.
First, a 60 cycle hum is generated by the non-humbucker, single pole pickups.
Shielding may help this problem but will not cure it.
Noiseless, stacked humbucker pickups is the only cure for eliminating 60 cycle hum in a Telecaster.
A hum that dissipates when you touch the strings or the control knobs indicates that you have an insufficient ground which is causing the hum.

My advice to cure this ground hum problem is as follows:

1) Remove the control plate and cut both ground wires from the pickups where they are soldered onto the back of the pot.
2) Leave the original ground wire from the jack soldered as is.
3) At the ground post on the jack, solder another dedicated ground wire onto the negative jack post.
4) Connect the pickup ground wires to the new dedicated ground wire.
5) Also connect a short ground wire to the new dedicated ground wire.
6) Loosen the top screw on the 3-way switch and place the other stripped end of the short ground wire between the switch frame and the chrome control plate, and retighten the screw.
7) Solder the "star" collection of ground wires with the dedicated ground wire.
8) Do not solder "ground star" to the back of a pot.
9) Cover the "ground star" with electrical tape.
10) Replace the control plate onto the guitar.

This method of grounding should cure the ground hum that occurs when you lift your fingers off the strings, assuming that the bridge is grounded.
"Star" grounding will also resolve possible ground loop hums.
It will not resolve the normal 60 cycle hum from the pickups.
Hope this helps.
I know this is a necro post, but this member's solution claims to reduce the electrical noise you get when you remove your hands from the strings of the guitar. I've never seen this solution proposed before in any other search, nor have I seen anyone propose a grounding variation on star grounding quite like this, especially one that claims to reduce the hum that can occur with single coil pickups even when you remove your hands from the strings. Maybe some wiring experts can weigh in on this. Is it valid? I have a few questions:
1. How does moving the ground star from the pot to the jack help?
2. How does adding a ground wire to the switch/plate help?
3. The original instructions were for a Tele. What would be the switch/plate ground wire equivalent for a rear routed strat with top mounted pickups?

Unfortunately, no one really commented on this guys post, and he only has one post, even after all this time, so I'm reposting it to get some feedback. Thanks!
Old 19th February 2020 | Show parent
  #64
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enorbet2's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hot Vibrato ➡️
The purpose of the STRING GROUND is so that WHEN YOU TOUCH THE STRINGS THE NOISE GOES AWAY. THAT'S WHY IT'S THERE! THIS IS NORMAL.

And watch this video: Guitar Ground: Dealing with ground noise problems - YouTube
Are you trolling or being "funny"? ... or maybe you never played through amps back in the day before The Death Cap Polarity Switch was removed? Whether or not the buzz gets louder or softer depends totally on polarity/phase.

The ground wire you correctly described is however NOT there so when you touch the metal parts, including strings, "the noise goes away". That is NOT normal.

If you check out the video you posted, at 1:31 he demonstrates that when properly grounded THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE. Ground, or Common, is there as THE shortest path to dissipate/absorb just like irl ground, Planet Earth. When properly grounded with metal wire, your body is no longer the path of least resistance, thus no difference.

NOTE: - If your guitar's metal parts are properly grounded and you play an amp with the Death Cap removed and you still get a change in noise when you touch metal parts there is very likely a problem in the polarity of the house power. This is one of the reasons in addition to perfect voltage control, that touring bands use real power conditioners.

There is no good reason to not ground or disconnect the grounding of metal parts on a guitar even if you run wireless to your amp and never get any buzz related to your guitar. Think about it... are you safer touching ground? or hot?
Old 20th February 2020 | Show parent
  #65
Gear Guru
 
John Eppstein's Avatar
 
58 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 ➡️
There is no good reason to not ground or disconnect the grounding of metal parts on a guitar even if you run wireless to your amp and never get any buzz related to your guitar. Think about it... are you safer touching ground? or hot?
Not to mention that lifting the ground to the metal parts of the guitar is almost certain to increase the noise problem.
Old 17th March 2020
  #66
Gear Nut
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipoff1 ➡️
Every time I take my fingers off the strings I get crazy buzzing and noise. I was recording the other day and thought I had a good take until I listened back carefully and could hear the friggin parts that I had to move off the strings
I have the same problem, it's gets significantly louder when my hands arent touching metal on my guitar. I was thinking maybe Hum X by Ebtech or Behringer HD400 would solve this problem or at least lessen the buzz/hum... i read a review that Hum X works on computer power cords for usb powered interfaces as well. any body own these products? does it help at all?
Old 20th March 2020 | Show parent
  #67
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John Eppstein's Avatar
 
58 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by andwutt ➡️
I have the same problem, it's gets significantly louder when my hands arent touching metal on my guitar. I was thinking maybe Hum X by Ebtech or Behringer HD400 would solve this problem or at least lessen the buzz/hum... i read a review that Hum X works on computer power cords for usb powered interfaces as well. any body own these products? does it help at all?
I have the Ebtech hum eliminators. They great for what they're designed to do, which is eliminating hum caused by ground loops. Unfortunately for you, your hum is not caused by a ground loop. Don't waste your money, unless you want to have one around for just in case you do get a ground loop.

Your problem is caused by environmental noise that is picked up by your guitar. There is no connection from your guitar to ground other than the one through the amp (unless you have ac powered effects or an ac power supply for an FX board, inm which case it might work - but you can check first by removing the FX from your righ and seeing if the noise goes away.)

To have a ground loop you need two separate connections to power ground.

Last edited by John Eppstein; 20th March 2020 at 10:59 PM..
Old 20th March 2020 | Show parent
  #68
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John Eppstein's Avatar
 
58 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by DG Hall ➡️
I know this is a necro post, but this member's solution claims to reduce the electrical noise you get when you remove your hands from the strings of the guitar. I've never seen this solution proposed before in any other search, nor have I seen anyone propose a grounding variation on star grounding quite like this, especially one that claims to reduce the hum that can occur with single coil pickups even when you remove your hands from the strings. Maybe some wiring experts can weigh in on this. Is it valid? I have a few questions:
1. How does moving the ground star from the pot to the jack help?
2. How does adding a ground wire to the switch/plate help?
3. The original instructions were for a Tele. What would be the switch/plate ground wire equivalent for a rear routed strat with top mounted pickups?

Unfortunately, no one really commented on this guys post, and he only has one post, even after all this time, so I'm reposting it to get some feedback. Thanks!
Actually, the only comment required was made, which is that it's a stupid "solution" based on total ignorance of grounding principles, it won't work, and the guy who posted it is an idiot.

That's why you've never seen it posted before, and that's why nobody who knows the most rudimentary facts about grounding would refer to it.

I'm pretty sure that it was answered by both Enorbet2 and myself, unless I saw that he covered it and didn't bother or vice-versa.

Star grounding won't work in a guitar since it does not have multiple paths to an AC power connection - it if it was implemented correctly, which it is not in that post.

You can ignore your questions, because they're based on an erroneous post.

Star grounding is used in studio applications to minimize potential ground loops between multiple pieces of AC powered, non-transformer isolated equipment, and inside individual pieces of AC powered equipment that contain multiple internal paths to power ground.

There is no AC line power inside an electric guitar.

FURTHERMORE, the noise a Telecaster picks up has nothing to do with power noise. The pickups in a single coil guitar like a Telecaster are BIG COILS OF WIRE WHICH MAKE EXCELLENT ANTENNAE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RADIO/MAGNETIC NOISE TRAVELING THROUGH THE AIR. Such noise can only be dealt with via shielding and/or the addition of a tuned humbucking coil, such as the Ilitch Noise Cancelling System. https://www.ilitchelectronics.com/
Old 20th March 2020 | Show parent
  #69
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John Eppstein's Avatar
 
58 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavern ➡️
I have a Les Paul that does this. Tried to figure out why and never could.
My Duo Jet, Strat and tele don't do this.
Same amp same rig.
What Les Paul?

Which pickups?

Does it have an out of phase switch?
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