Quantcast
Essential Guitars / Accessories for Production - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Essential Guitars / Accessories for Production
Old 22nd September 2012
  #1
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Essential Guitars / Accessories for Production

Short of buying absolutely every guitar and accessorie ever made I was wondering what a music producer like myself would need to add to his collection to make life easier.
I produce alot of guitar / pop / rock so Pink / Sheryl Crowe / Tom Petty / Avril Lavigne / Coldplay / Killers / Miley Cyrus / Sheryl Cole / Natalie Umbruglia / Lady GaGa / Ed Sheeran
Esoteric guitars aside, ie tones and vibes that might feature every other album, are there are any guitars I need beyond the ones I have already...

Fender Strat - covers my funk and blues stuff and some country
Fender Tele - covers my country / hard rock rhythms
E335 - covers my humbucker / heavy rock tones.
73 Fender Jazz Bass - Beautiful instrument but not always great for pop productions where I need a brighter sound...suggestions?
Martin Acoustic - small body, although I think a dreadnought might be more useful for the strummey feel I most often use it for.

I thinks its mostly bass and acoustic variation I need, no 12 string or national yet.

As well, could do with some recommendations for stomp boxes, I've got a Rat / octavor and Vox wah wah, but want at least one pedal for vintage strangulation / compresser / distortion vibes.

Look forward to hearing suggestions!
Old 22nd September 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
chrispick's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I think an SG and a Rickenbacker would fill out your electric guitars needs.

A jumbo Gibson or Guild acoustic might be good for strummy stuff, as you put it.

Maybe a Music Man Stingray or a Hofner-style for bass guitar variety?

There could be a hundred distortion pedal suggestions. A Big Muff, Tube Screamer or Fuzz Face pedal seem to be the next obvious go-tos, though.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #3
Deleted User
Guest
I have a Gibson 335 that I use from time to time but I think it lacks something because of the laminated wood, it has a nasally sound. I think you should try, but not necessarily buy, a Gibson Les Paul or SG -- mainly because of the solid wood body.

A more rock-orientated acoustic guitar would be a Gibson acoustic, a J45 or perhaps a J200. They a big sound that suits Cheryl Crow strummed parts.

Also, much more MPG may be obtained by looking for older guitars, not Gibson Martin or Fender. I'm thinking Harmony, some of those odd-ball English electric guitars, perhaps Swedish acoustic guitars from the seventies. I'm not sure how plentiful these are but every local market is different.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Unclenny's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
acoustic variation
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacktadoussac ➑️
I'm thinking Harmony
Even if you are primarily tracking strummed acoustic guitars there may well come a time when you want a barebones fingerpicked guitar sound. A small body box like the Gibson L1 or its cheaper cousin, an old Kalamazoo might come in handy.

Those old Stellas come dirt cheap and can give you that authentic Robert Johnson sound too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
at least one pedal for vintage strangulation / compresser / distortion vibes.
Definitely need a good compressor pedal like perhaps a fine Keeley product.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #5
Lives for gear
 
CJ1973's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I'm on a similar search and yours is interesting. I posted a thread myself but I gathered I try and find one versatile guitar, rather than use many. Did you consider that option?
Ie. an HSS Strat perhaps?

With bass, I also have a Jazz Bass which is versatile, but only within it's own sphere. I an looking at an 80s Music Man Stingray and a Rick 4031 type....a few of my friends are insisting I just get a P bass and move on. I like the sound of Rick for rock/pop stuff.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #6
Lives for gear
 
GearAndGuitars's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
Short of buying absolutely every guitar and accessorie ever made I was wondering what a music producer like myself would need to add to his collection to make life easier.
I produce alot of guitar / pop / rock so Pink / Sheryl Crowe / Tom Petty / Avril Lavigne / Coldplay / Killers / Miley Cyrus / Sheryl Cole / Natalie Umbruglia / Lady GaGa / Ed Sheeran
Esoteric guitars aside, ie tones and vibes that might feature every other album, are there are any guitars I need beyond the ones I have already...

Fender Strat - covers my funk and blues stuff and some country
Fender Tele - covers my country / hard rock rhythms
E335 - covers my humbucker / heavy rock tones.
73 Fender Jazz Bass - Beautiful instrument but not always great for pop productions where I need a brighter sound...suggestions?
Martin Acoustic - small body, although I think a dreadnought might be more useful for the strummey feel I most often use it for.

I thinks its mostly bass and acoustic variation I need, no 12 string or national yet.

As well, could do with some recommendations for stomp boxes, I've got a Rat / octavor and Vox wah wah, but want at least one pedal for vintage strangulation / compresser / distortion vibes.

Look forward to hearing suggestions!
Great list - I'd think you'd want a Les Paul in there somewhere?

I'm on the hunt for a "bright but full" acoustic. I have a great sounding Epiphone Masterbuilt but man, the jumbo size is a drag for me.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #7
Lives for gear
 
litepipe's Avatar
Def a hofner or guild hollow body bass. You didn't say anything about amps. So much of those tones are from great amps.

I like to print fx so which ones I use are important. I use fulltone TTE for delay or just to preamp the signal. I also use a van amps sole mate or valve train spring thing for reverb.

I don't use much compression but I'd I do it's a keeley. Good to have a fuzz. I like the prescription electronics experience. A tube screamer is a good to have lying around..

These days I get all that vintage breakup from amps. Very little pedals. Sounds so much better.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #8
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
@chrispick. Totally agree on a Rick, Musicman and Gibson large body. I actually thought of these shortly after posting. SG I'm not so clear on do you really think the SG is dramatically different to the E335? I mean I know an e335 is not a Les Paul either but it does loosley the same kind of thing right? Or not, would like to know when you would forgo a les paul or an E335 for an SG.

Good suggestions. Thanks
Old 22nd September 2012
  #9
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
@litepipe
I'm using the Kemper profiler for my amp sounds which is insanely good. I've got a huge range of some incredibly authentic amps...thats a whole other thread I suspect
Old 22nd September 2012
  #10
Lives for gear
 
CJ1973's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
@litepipe
I'm using the Kemper profiler for my amp sounds which is insanely good. I've got a huge range of some incredibly authentic amps...thats a whole other thread I suspect
Always curious with this for studio work...you don't need anything but the guitar right? Plug in and then to daw right?
I checked out the videos..the sound to me just sounded a little compressed..am I tripping or is that the nature of this unit? In % terms, how close would you say this is to a real amp?
Old 22nd September 2012 | Show parent
  #11
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ1973 ➑️
Always curious with this for studio work...you don't need anything but the guitar right? Plug in and then to daw right?
I checked out the videos..the sound to me just sounded a little compressed..am I tripping or is that the nature of this unit? In % terms, how close would you say this is to a real amp?
You just need the guitar and a DAW. I'd say its so darned close it wont make any difference as far as recording goes. Compressed...dont know that I notice theres such a range of sounds some might seem more compressed than others. Its still the clean sounds that give it away but this just not bothering me, and that would be being very critical. I think even if you have a collection of great amps a profiler is a unique thing in its own right and gives you far more tonal options. Best suited to studio.
BTW I'll be upfront here I am a UK distribitor for the Kemper Just before anyone else points this out, but I do genuinely own my own profiler because of how great it is, pods and so forth do not compare IMO.
Old 22nd September 2012
  #12
Lives for gear
 
chrispick's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Your E335 with humbuckers will give you loosely the same tones as an SG or LP, yes. I was thinking a solid body SG, especially one with hot-wound pick-ups, would allow you to really crank volumes -- a good soloing guitar. They also seem to be relatively commonplace in the kind of alt/rock/pop stuff you mentioned (e.g., Jeff Tweedy/Wilco). A jangly Rickenbacker would give you broader, quicker timbral variety, though.

You could grab an SG with P90s for another tonal flavor.
Old 22nd September 2012 | Show parent
  #13
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrispick ➑️
Your E335 with humbuckers will give you loosely the same tones as an SG or LP, yes. I was thinking a solid body SG, especially one with hot-wound pick-ups, would allow you to really crank volumes -- a good soloing guitar. They also seem to be relatively commonplace in the kind of alt/rock/pop stuff you mentioned (e.g., Jeff Tweedy/Wilco). A jangly Rickenbacker would give you broader, quicker timbral variety, though.

You could grab an SG with P90s for another tonal flavor.
I might have to find cheap cheerful versions of these, do you think that a relatively inexpensive 12 string electric would do the job, not a rick sound but at least a good jangly, acidy Petty sort of sound and if so any recommendations?
Likewise a cheap but good SG copy...Epiphone perhaps?
Old 22nd September 2012
  #14
Lives for gear
 
chrispick's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
re: Rickenbacker 12-string -- There are less expensive options, yes. Some players actually prefer them. Both Gretsch and Schecter make models that are said to be good for their price. I wanted the specific Rick 12 sound, so I bought one and never looked back (mine goes through a comp pedal, then an AC-15). You pay a hefty premium, though.

I was actually talking about a Rick 6-string before, but a Rick 12-string is cooler.

re: SG -- I would check out a Gibson Standard P-90 SG or a similar used model.

Just this one man's opinion.
Old 23rd September 2012
  #15
Deleted User
Guest
If you're looking at acoustic guitars, look at the impact of different woods on tone. Obviously the luthiers like Bourgeois consider every possible variation in wood species. But I think the wood that the sides and back are made with has a big impact on brightness. Rosewood can be very bright, I think a more balanced tone can come from mahogany or maple. Obviously listen to a bunch of different guitars and form your own opinion. I admit I may have maple on the brain, meaning I find my existing rosewood guitars a little bright.
Old 23rd September 2012
  #16
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
12 Strings: The Schecter looks great, pretty good price point although I might even go cheaper than this, the Italia Rimidi looks interesting for Β£399.00

Acoustic Guitars: This has been a bit of an issue for me. I recently bought a Taylor 310CE to replace the Martin and returned it, I found it quite disapponting although I know its an excellent guitar for me it had a plasticky top end that was remarkably like the laminate body Martin, the guitars dont seem to dramatically improve until I get upto Β£1600 - Β£1800 mark. That said I tried a Martin dreadnought - I really liked for Β£800 but I was hoping my next upgrade would get me out of the laminate made in china market.
Old 23rd September 2012
  #17
Moderator
 
James Lugo's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Personally for day to day studio work imo a 335 never takes the place of a good LP. Les Paul is probably the single most useful guitar followed by a Tele.

my 2 cents
Old 23rd September 2012
  #18
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Your Tele, Strat, and ES-335 cover a lot of bases already. A good Les Paul Standard will fill out your guitar tones nicely. I love SG's, also.

As far as accessories go, I'd say the following are probably the basics for any setup.
- Good strobe tuner. Personally, my favorite is the Turbo Tuner.
- Compressor pedal. There are bunch of good ones. I have an original Janglebox, but the newer ones are a lot more flexible.
- Delay pedal. Also, tons of great options. I use the MXR Carbon Copy and the Aqua Puss.
- Good OD pedal. I'm not a collector of these, but I've been very happy with my Zendrive2. The Zendrive is nice, but is a bit more specialized than the Zendrive2. The Fulltone OCD is a nice pedal, too.

For D sized acoustics, I'm a big fan of mahogany backed J45's. My next guitar will be a vintage J45 or a mahogany Bourgeois Slope-D. My only flat-top now is a Brazilian Bourgeois OMC. I'll own it until I die, but as they're going for $6-7 grand now, it would be hard to justify unless you're a pretty serious fingerpicker.

I'm not a bass player, but I have a pair of nice basses. One is a Yamaha BB1200, which I have strung with heavy flat-wounds. The other is a beat-to-hell G&L L2000 that I've strung with Rotosounds. The G&L is a very flexible bass, although I think I want to change the strings to something with a bit more thump and grind. The neck is a lot wider than a J-bass, though, so it takes more technique to play than you might be used to. Between those 2 basses, I can cover an awful lot of sonic territory. I only payed around $400 for each of them.

Although a bass amp is kind of a luxury, I have a B-15R that I really love. It does everything the old B-15 does, and the range has been extended into more modern territory. My best tone right now is the line-out mixed with a direct signal. I've been experimenting with micing the cab, and I'm encouraged by the results, so I expect that will end up somewhere in my repertoire of sounds. IK Multimedia's SVX is a really nice alternative, too.
Old 23rd September 2012
  #19
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Thanks all,

Anyone able to add any thoughts about bass?
I think this is an area that could really make the biggest difference to me right now, my Jazz is just too dark and vintage for alot of contemporary pop, need somthing modern, bold and bright. Stingray appeals but it needs to Rock and Pop!
Old 23rd September 2012 | Show parent
  #20
Lives for gear
 
GearAndGuitars's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lugo ➑️
Personally for day to day studio work imo a 335 never takes the place of a good LP. Les Paul is probably the single most useful guitar followed by a Tele.

my 2 cents
I'd agree with that, as my two most used studio guitars are also a les paul and a tele...
Old 23rd September 2012
  #21
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
@kafka and Gear and Guitars...or any huge Les Paul fans...what music do you do guys?
Old 23rd September 2012 | Show parent
  #22
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
Thanks all,

Anyone able to add any thoughts about bass?
I think this is an area that could really make the biggest difference to me right now, my Jazz is just too dark and vintage for alot of contemporary pop, need somthing modern, bold and bright. Stingray appeals but it needs to Rock and Pop!
Iwas at a seminar one day and a panelist opined that an electric bass had four strings and said "Fender" on the headstock. I mostly agree with this but there are some wonderful high end basses out there. my brother has a couple of dozen, and some are just amazing.

I found a Heartfield for my basic studio bass. It is a Fender product, plays like a dream, and has powered pickups. But I also have a Fender VI and used to have a Fender V. The Stingray also appeals to me.
Old 23rd September 2012 | Show parent
  #23
Lives for gear
 
GearAndGuitars's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
@kafka and Gear and Guitars...or any huge Les Paul fans...what music do you do guys?
Mostly... I'm doing alternative/rock and ambient/experimental guitar stuff.

I aspire to record stuff like Daniel Lanois' solo material, Lanterna, etc. I don't always hit the mark. Most of my stuff is heavily post processed with eventides and lexicons as separate return stems (ala eno).

For other people I've recorded/produced a bunch of alt/rock and garage/punk stuff. Some country, some blues, some pop. No metal, shred, thrash, etc.

I jokingly refer to the genre of some of my not so great demos as "show room floor" a kind of generic take on something that was once great...

I'm just getting around now to uploading a bunch of stuff to Soundcloud and Youtube. Some of it dates back to my first 4-6 weeks of playing... but what the hell, if someone can learn from my mistakes, so be it.

Also, being in my 40s and just learning to PLAY guitar, I don't have a ton of time to practice and I don't ever expect to be a great player. I'm grateful for technology and the use of the tools I have to record some music that sounds reasonably good (for my tastes).
Old 23rd September 2012
  #24
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
I'm definitely going to try a fender p, this seems a no brainer.
Scheduling in massive guitar store visit for this week.
Old 23rd September 2012
  #25
Lives for gear
 
chrispick's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Another choice to consider: Pick up any decent 6-string electric, then high-string it (Nashville string it, some say). I guaranteed you you'll put it to use, and the investment is nominal compared to other choices.

I use a passive Fender P-bass for most of my stuff, and I love it. However, a Jazz bass gets the job done, too, and not that radically differently, so you have a good tool in your hands already.
Old 24th September 2012
  #26
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Hey Chris,
What a great tip, cant believe I'm so ignorant to these things despite having played a guitar 25 years. Its actually only recently I started using Mandolins and autoharps to stretch chord structures so its of great benefit to hear about it now.

Re Pbass: I'm taking my Jazz with me to the store when I trial a P bass I've got a sneaky suspicion its what I need. The Jazz is beautiful, I adore it but its just not cutting it for music where I really want to hear the bass extension and note presence, I find it too warm whereas I think the P might be a little bolder.
I think with the Jazz and the Precision I'll have a pretty comprehensive bass arsenal.

Any tips on what to spend on these? Budget is an issue, sub Β£500 or $900 is my limit but I want to avoid buying one of those Fenders that end up neglected with an action you could drive a bus under. I cant get the same grade as my vintage Jazz but I'd like to feel its not too compromising.
Old 24th September 2012 | Show parent
  #27
Gear Addict
 
Yeah, right...'s Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrispick ➑️
Another choice to consider: Pick up any decent 6-string electric, then high-string it (Nashville string it, some say). I guaranteed you you'll put it to use, and the investment is nominal compared to other choices.
Absolutely! I have one of my strats set-up this way and it gets regular use.

Also essential imo is a hi-strung acoustic. Either strummed or finger-picked they sound really great. Often, if there's only one acoustic gtr on the track I'll use the hi-strung as it generally sits better in dense mixes. Can also just interesting textures when open tuned, particularly when finger-picked.

For more "acoustic" tracks I often double the acoustic guitar track (with standard & hi-strung tuned) and pan appropriately.

I prefer smaller body guitars but anything works so long as the quality is ok.

And I agree totally with James Lugo - a good Les Paul is an essential electric.

Good luck, Mike
Old 24th September 2012
  #28
Lives for gear
 
chrispick's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
A P-Bass will give a characteristic punch to your bass tracks; you'll hear it immediately. I think if you're doing tracks that benefit from either a punk bass or old Motown bass vibe, a Precision gets you there without a lot of fuss.

A Precision plus a Jazz should cover nearly all your needs, I suspect. If you get a chance, test drive a Hofner, too. They really have their own vibe, and seem popular in some indie pop/rock (e.g., Jon Brion productions).

+ 1 on high-stringing an acoustic, too. I did it to a really cheap Ibanez acoustic, and it worked great. It turned a pretty thin, tinny instrument into something I could use. I usually mix it in low so it's a secondary/accent timbre.

Autoharps are super cool, though, especially when they have funky intonation. I need to get one!
Old 24th September 2012
  #29
Lives for gear
 
GRiFF's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
The Autoharp cost me Β£20 from a carboot sale a while back, its not a great example but much like the hi string guitar it doesnt necessarily have to be, my mandolin is inexpensive also, but its ideal for adding mid range drive to acoustics.

I've got about Β£2000 to use on what I buy next so clearly I have to cover alot of ground, but the bass I think its going to really make a difference, as well as the P I might be able to score a cheap Yamaha Pacifica 12 String or maybe a Schecter Stargazer which might do enough on that front, theres enough money to buy a second acoustic for high stringing and maybe even as well for a Les Paul or SG epiphone model.
Though I still think an LP or SG might be overkill when really my quest is for tones I really cannot cover with what I have.
This brings to mind a Gretch, which I think for me could be more useful tonally than an LP.
Old 24th September 2012 | Show parent
  #30
Lives for gear
 
Bob Ross's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GRiFF ➑️
Anyone able to add any thoughts about bass?
I think this is an area that could really make the biggest difference to me right now, my Jazz is just too dark and vintage for alot of contemporary pop, need somthing modern, bold and bright. Stingray appeals but it needs to Rock and Pop!
Stingray is a good choice for something more "modern, bold and bright" than a Jazz bass (especially if your Jazz is "dark and vintage" sounding...though for that very reason do not get rid of the Jazz!).
Another good choice for the "modern, bold and bright" sound that's still a versatile studio bass and as reliable as an old standby Fender would be one of the Laklands with the LH3 electronics. Either the USA-made or the imported Skyline series.
πŸ“ Reply

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 119 views: 11957
Avatar for Deleted c3d96187aa25e9e
Deleted c3d96187aa25e9e 7th April 2018
replies: 3008 views: 271216
Avatar for feck
feck 9th February 2014
replies: 100 views: 11299
Avatar for Riccardo
Riccardo 25th November 2013
replies: 11 views: 2169
Avatar for Jim@SSL
[email protected] 8th May 2020
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump