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Lol why do ppl use capo's?
Old 15th September 2012
  #1
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JLiRD808's Avatar
 
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🎧 10 years
Lol why do ppl use capo's?

Im normally a bass player...but have fooling around with guitar on n off for about 4yrs. Ive NEVER used a capo though. I know what a capo DOES, just cant really figure out why u'd knock two or more frets off ur neck. But then again...i only play barre chords lol.

What am i missing out on? U can flame me if u want, i probly deserve it lol.
Old 15th September 2012
  #2
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Tashez's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
...
Old 15th September 2012
  #3
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narcoman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Vai uses capos on acoustic stuff.

open chords. Different to Barre.
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #4
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Sofa King's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tashez ➑️
Capos are for re tards who haven't got the dexterity to play different chord shapes in order to play different keys.
Yeah thats it.
Thread closed...
Old 15th September 2012
  #5
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #6
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tashez ➑️
Capos are for re tards who haven't got the dexterity to play different chord shapes in order to play different keys. It's easier. I'm sure alot of people will argue that point but that's the truth. You won't see Vai , Satriani or even the late Randy Rhodes who played in every key use one. These gentlemen of coarse were real guitarists unlike Sheryl Crowe.


Of course there are also partial capos, which can be combined in various ways and changed while playing ... combine with a style favouring 'open' tunings and you'll end up being able to do things that are impossible any other way with only 1 pair of hands. And that can lead to some interesting music, even though it means one must have no dexterity order to even consider it
Old 15th September 2012
  #7
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🎧 5 years
Actually you will see Vai capo with his right hand or picking hand when tapping. But that's different.
Old 15th September 2012
  #8
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KRStudio's Avatar
 
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Try playing "open chords" on the 3rd fret. Now try them on 5th fret. Next play the same bar chords. Does it sound the same?
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #9
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Sofa King's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tashez ➑️
Actually you will see Vai capo with his right hand or picking hand when tapping. But that's different.
Actually.
You are without a clue.

Lets remove the Almighty Mr. Vai from the discussion for a moment..

Google capo for christsakes and see what people are doing, that cannot be done unless you have some sort of killer bonus fingers that none of us have.

wow.
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Old 15th September 2012
  #10
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narcoman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Exactly - try playing a blues droning riff in F or G without a capo (or a retune). Those slurring different methods of guitar work show themselves to know nothing of the instrument. It's like saying wearing finger picks is a no-no or playing open chords is wrong....; how would some of these naysayers play an open chord folk song in G sharp?

heh
Old 15th September 2012
  #11
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Capos open up a bunch of different chord voicings and open string licks in different keys for an experienced player, or let a beginner that may only know a few chords easily change keys.
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Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #12
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12ax7's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
.
Sure, a capo CAN be used as a "crutch" (and often IS).

...BUT, that is not it's ONLY use:

For instance, when doubling rhythm guitars, try tuning one of them down by a half (or full) step and then capo it back up by the same amount.

...THICK!
.
Old 15th September 2012
  #13
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Can people really be this narrow-minded?
There's nothing wrong when using a capo, so why bother even asking such questions...
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Old 15th September 2012
  #14
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Capo's are very useful if you are playing open cowboy chord type voicings that are a pain to fret further up the neck - especially if you are are a singer using a key appropriate to your voice. It allows you to just play the chords while concentrating on singing. No biggie.

A piano can employ the same fingered voicings easily all the way up the keyboard (not so easy on guitar). A capo can be of help there...
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #15
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ckreon's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12ax7 ➑️
.
Sure, a capo CAN be used as a "crutch" (and often IS).

...BUT, that is not it's ONLY use:

For instance, when doubling rhythm guitars, try tuning one of them down by a half (or full) step and then capo it back up by the same amount.

...THICK!
.
There are a few people that take the time to fully format and emphasize their posts.

I always wonder how much time they spend writing these, and I always read them to find the cool creative advice.

So, keep on formatting (and if you wouldn't mind taking a stress off my brain - how long do you spend writing these?)!
Old 15th September 2012 | Show parent
  #16
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckreon ➑️

So, keep on formatting (and if you wouldn't mind taking a stress off my brain - how long do you spend writing these?)!
.
Not much.

(I'm a fast typist.)

By the way, the reason I do it is because I like lots of "white space".

It makes things easier to read.

...And therefore more likely to BE read.

I try to do the same thing in music production, too.

Things have more "punch" when sparse.
.
Old 16th September 2012
  #17
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🎧 15 years
The people that posted that they are somehow a cop-out probably do not have the experience to answer the question.

How about a couple more useful answers. Let's take producing someone's song as the setting.

1) You are in the key of G, because the artists voice can only pull off the melody in that key. You want to play a melody on the guitar that is only "possible" in the D chord "form" (think "thank you" from zepplin). You need a capo.

2) Since guitars can be "funny" about intonation playing in A (If you tune the A chord perfect, dropping the c# a touch while tweaking that open e at the top. You will notice that when you go to the IV chord, you want to vomit at the sound of the f# on top of the D chord). Solution, play it in G capo'd 2nd fret...... We didn't even begin to deal with the g# in the V chord.

3) Still in the key of G, you have a strummed rhythm track you can live with. Now, you could double that track in the same position..... And result in 2 parts that fight for the listeners ear........ or, double the part with a capo using the d form.... a little arpeggio action on the chords instead of strumming. Wow, now your guitar parts don't fight each other. Who knew?


Morel's of the story

1) Capo's are useful

2) Most guitar players are not

Good luck
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Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #18
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ckreon's Avatar
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagelove ➑️
Morel's of the story

1) Capo's are useful

2) Most guitar players are not

Good luck
So true.
Old 16th September 2012
  #19
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sluttygear's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Capos are good for playing open chords in different voicings up and down the neck.

A great trick: Record 2 guitars playing the same part in 2 different voices. Especially with acoustic guitar. Adds color and texture to the sound

Yes capos are fairly useless if you just play bar chords
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #20
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12ax7's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
.
'Vintagelove' raised an interesting point in post #17 about the use of capos to overcome certain tuning issues:

Certain chords on the guitar are prone to certain proclivities of intonation (especially with certain chord progressions).

...And this gets even stranger when using certain "alternative" tunings.

When improvising a solution, it is possible to use a "crutch" as a "lever".
.
Old 16th September 2012
  #21
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JLiRD808's Avatar
 
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U guys are awesome...some great comments and opinions.

Another reason I brought it up was...98% of the live acoustic players Ive been seeing lately have a capo on. Then I just watched "Walk the Line" and (though I cant judge it for accuracy) didn't see one on Joaquim's (as Cash) guitar. I'm sure if Cash did use one, it'd been in the movie.

Anyways...so Cash, Vai, whoever...its clearly a pref thing and opens up chords for people who know how to use them.

Again, I only know bar chords so far...so I dont think this even applies to me. If I were to actually take some lessons, I would def ask how I COULD use them and go from there.

THANKS!
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #22
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12ax7's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLiRD808 ➑️
[...]
98% of the live acoustic players Ive been seeing lately have a capo on.
[...]
There can be other reasons for this besides "laziness":

...Sometimes in a live situation, it is quicker to put on a capo than it is to re-tune your guitar to a different tuning to fit your voice.

If you have a guitar tech on hand, they could just hand you a guitar that is set up for the song you're getting ready to do.

...But for the rest of us...
.
Old 16th September 2012
  #23
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
All of the reasons given above in favor of capos is correct. Intonation and playing open chords up the neck are both valid reasons. Certain styles music - bluegrass, for example - make use of certain runs and patterns that are better suited to specific keys and chords. While these runs and patterns can be played without a capo, the notes are often not in the right place to play them fluidly. Using a capo to change key while retaining the chord shapes of the original key can allow the player to use the benefits of the original chord patterns.

But for every player who knows that when choosing to use a capo, there are probably two more who just don't know more than a handful of chords and use a capo to "cheat" when they need to play in another key. But most of those guys wouldn't be playing runs and patterns anyway, just struggling to play basic common chords.
Old 16th September 2012
  #24
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
A capo gives you a bunch of instruments with shorter scale length. That's all. Nobody considers a good violin or mandolin or ukelele or bango (etc, etc) to be musical instruments for [email protected] ([email protected] might attempt to play these instruments, and often do, but it's not the fault of the instrument).

Using a shorter scale length gives you different voicings - which is very useful in the studio. The Beatles were masters of using capos to get different voicings out of guitars. Anyone listening to George Harrison play "Here comes the sun" isn't likely to call him a [email protected], unless they are a [email protected] themselves. That magical sound can only be achieved with a capo on the 7th fret.

You may as well argue that using drop tuning is for [email protected] too, if you think that it's all about playing in different keys without using barr chords ...

A real musician uses whatever method gets the tones they want to hear - regardless of how easy or hard it makes it.

Last edited by Kiwi; 16th September 2012 at 05:55 AM.. Reason: Freedom of speech
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Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tashez ➑️
Capos are for re tards who haven't got the dexterity to play different chord shapes in order to play different keys. It's easier. I'm sure alot of people will argue that point but that's the truth. You won't see Vai , Satriani or even the late Randy Rhodes who played in every key use one. These gentlemen of coarse were real guitarists unlike Sheryl Crowe.
My great uncle, Alvin Capo, with his fused since birth index and middle finger, and who swore that James Ashborn stole his idea for patent, would have to disagree with you.
Old 16th September 2012
  #26
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🎧 5 years
I use a capo to help compensate for a total lack of playing skills.
No excuses here.

As mentioned above, there are some quite good examples to get interesting results that would be impossible without a capo. But for me, it's cause I can't play for ****.

I even use one when playing bass. Then I can play octave's apart without getting callouses from sliding.

Yep, you wont see me on the cover of Guitarist Magazine anytime soon.

Still, I quite enjoy myself when "playing".
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tashez ➑️
Capos are for re tards who haven't got the dexterity to play different chord shapes in order to play different keys. It's easier. I'm sure alot of people will argue that point but that's the truth. You won't see Vai , Satriani or even the late Randy Rhodes who played in every key use one. These gentlemen of coarse were real guitarists unlike Sheryl Crowe.
This is flat out, unmitigated bull****...I sincerely hope no one actually believes this is a "good" response to this thread.

Capos for the gigging musician are extremely useful for all kinds of things including key changes (quickly) simple retunings (in the case of partial capos) and ease of use while on stage. Professional musicians use capos all the time including "the great Steve Vai"!

Tashez...you only cause problems when you make posts like this. There's nothing wrong with using a capo, and Sheryl Crow is a whole hell of a lot more of a notable name than whatever yours is, so I wouldn't be so quick to put down those that, frankly, have "made it". Who are you exactly?
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #28
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12ax7's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi ➑️

Using a shorter scale length gives you different voicings - which is very useful in the studio. The Beatles were masters of using capos to get different voicings out of guitars. Anyone listening to George Harrison play "Here comes the sun" isn't likely to call him a [email protected], unless they are a [email protected] themselves. That magical sound can only be achieved with a capo on the 7th fret.
Yep.

Especially with an acoustic, putting a capo way up the neck can give you a sound reminiscent of a mandolin.

...And all those different voicings can come in pretty handy when you're trying to add parts to flesh things out without having them crowd oneanother out of the mix.
.
Old 16th September 2012
  #29
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🎧 5 years
But despite having to use a capo for my lack of chops,
people who have heard me play have often compared
me to Hendricks.
Not Jimi, but Christina, the bosomy lady from Mad Men.


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Old 16th September 2012
  #30
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
A capo makes each guitar a different instrument; different sounding, different playing. When doubling parts, you can capo and play new chord shapes that make for a different sound. When you are in a tuning for slide playing, a capo may not be required to play a tune, but it will sound better with the capo. That applies to regular tuning too - a capo may not be required to play the song, but so often it sounds better with the capo.

Also a great help for songwriting. Didn't Irving Berlin have a piano with a sliding keyboard so that he could play in any key with "C" fingering? And, how many keyboardists use the transpose function on their keyboards? Who cares as long as it works for the music?

Best...H
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