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Lol why do ppl use capo's?
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #61
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🎧 15 years
That spider capo looks a bit technically better designed that the Scott one.

My problem was that I'd use the Scott Capo to create a guitar part then forget how I set it. If you don't write down where the capo was and how it was set you'll have a hell of a job working it out again.
Old 16th September 2012
  #62
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🎧 15 years
I might get that Spider Capo. The Scott one is bad design. You have to take it off to change it but the mechanism to hold it on isn't very good either.
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #63
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12ax7's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
.
I often use a capo with NO GUITAR AT ALL!

...But then again, my girlfriend is pretty damn kinky!
.
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #64
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Kevaso's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12ax7 ➡️
.
Sure, a capo CAN be used as a "crutch" (and often IS).

...BUT, that is not it's ONLY use:

For instance, when doubling rhythm guitars, try tuning one of them down by a half (or full) step and then capo it back up by the same amount.

...THICK!
.
This...sounds...AWESOME. I must try this
Old 16th September 2012 | Show parent
  #65
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Kevaso's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLiRD808 ➡️
U guys are awesome...some great comments and opinions.

Another reason I brought it up was...98% of the live acoustic players Ive been seeing lately have a capo on. Then I just watched "Walk the Line" and (though I cant judge it for accuracy) didn't see one on Joaquim's (as Cash) guitar. I'm sure if Cash did use one, it'd been in the movie.

Anyways...so Cash, Vai, whoever...its clearly a pref thing and opens up chords for people who know how to use them.

Again, I only know bar chords so far...so I dont think this even applies to me. If I were to actually take some lessons, I would def ask how I COULD use them and go from there.

THANKS!
Get one and just imagine you're playing on a shorter guitar. Definitely a good inspirational tool
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #66
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Unclenny's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi ➡️
Using a shorter scale length gives you different voicings - which is very useful in the studio.
I kept the capo handy all the time back when I was the dude up there with an acoustic guitar and a harmonica in a rack.......for obvious reasons. Have not used one for years here in the studio.

.......until just the other day when I was trying to track a simple clean fingerpicking thing with my strat as a starter for a new tune. Couldn't get it....didn't feel right......until I put the capo on the fifth fret and everything came alive.

Some of those old blues guys never took 'em off. Got a picture right here in front of me of Albert Collins playing a Tele that's capo'd at the seventh fret.
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #67
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🎧 10 years
.
At this point I might point out that when using a capo, getting a decent tuning can be a REAL BITCH!

The guitar won't REALLY tune properly with the capo on; and with the capo off, ya can't really hear what your tuning will truly bring.

Its kinda like trying to use a level or a plub-bob when doing woodworking on a boat at sea.
...BUT STILL...
.
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #68
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3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12ax7 ➡️
.
I often use a capo with NO GUITAR AT ALL!

...But then again, my girlfriend is pretty damn kinky!
.
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #69
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DistortingJack's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12ax7 ➡️
.
At this point I might point out that when using a capo, getting a decent tuning can be a REAL BITCH!

The guitar won't REALLY tune properly with the capo on; and with the capo off, ya can't really hear what your tuning will truly bring.

Its kinda like trying to use a level or a plub-bob when doing woodworking on a boat at sea.
...BUT STILL...
.
The best guitars shouldn't have this problem.
A good tip is to place the capo very very close to the fret; the increased tension in that position will pull the string less, causing it to go out of tune a lot less than if you place the capo in the middle.
Old 17th September 2012
  #70
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There are capos that are better for the job too. G7th capos keep tuning better. Not cheap but better tuning.
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #71
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12ax7 ➡️
.[INDENT]At this point I might point out that when using a capo, getting a decent tuning can be a REAL BITCH!

The guitar won't REALLY tune properly with the capo on; and with the capo off, ya can't really hear what your tuning will truly bring.
Yes and no. besides the obvious compromises due to neck/fret design, it can also be a matter of strings/gauges, relief, and setup at the bridge. (In other words, you might be able to get a little closer than you are now.)
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #72
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by narcoman ➡️
a bass player who wouldn't understand such things is only playing half the instrument ( which is fine)! Pastorius capo'ed his bass occasionally! A much harder instrument to play well... good bass players are worth their weight in coke.
Best bass player I knew back in the day more or less consumed his weight in coke and pretty much wasn't worth **** after that... caveat qui attrahit.
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #73
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortingJack ➡️
The best guitars shouldn't have this problem.
A good tip is to place the capo very very close to the fret; the increased tension in that position will pull the string less, causing it to go out of tune a lot less than if you place the capo in the middle.
Closer you get to the fret, though, the more stress it puts on the bind of the winding to the core, leading to stretches and gaps in the winding. I try to find the happy medium -- I'm often about 75-80% of the way to the fret.

Of course, lots of things stress and stretch strings, including, you know, playing. While there's a certain charm to old strings, if you want to maximize in-tuneness, changing strings (particularly for those of us with aggressive technique) is important.


_________________



Speaking of capos, I swear, next capo I buy is going to be the Spyder Capo, with an individual stop for each string, so you can do 'partial capo' tricks. Not really a substitute, I don't think for a good conventional capo but, hoo boy, they look like serious fun*...

http://www.spydercapo.net/


*I do got a minor kvetch about them conflating open string tunings with capo trick 'tunings' but it's a minor, semantic thing. Obviously capo trick tunings are very different than a 'similar' open tuning. An easy to grasp example would be open D. If you downtune the 6th string a step, you end up having to rejigger your fingerings (which is a mixed bag, of course, good and bad). If you take a c-clamp capo and place it across the top 5 strings at the second fret, you get that root bass when playing a "D" chord (now an E because of the capo, with the n-capoed open E string on the bottom) -- but most of your fingering of chords -- like the all-important G (IV chord in D of course) will allow you to use familiar fingering. So, capo trick 'tunings' and seemingly parallel open tunings are really not the same and your playing will have to accomodate that.


____________


Props to Lenny for remembering another guitar great, Albert Collins, who was no stranger to the capo!
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #74
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by logichead ➡️
And, how many keyboardists use the transpose function on their keyboards? Who cares as long as it works for the music?

Best...H
That's more of a crutch then a device like a capo, though.

I don't think I've ever used the transpose button and I have no intention ever. The main problem is, as a pianist/keyboardist, my voicings and lines take into account what key I'm in and the overall sound of the key. Something that works in one key most definitely is capable of sounding horrible in another key.

The most simple example - Play a C root position triad starting on the C below middle C (left hand). Now transpose the keyboard down to E because you want to play in E but you don't know how. Instant mud.

If you know you're in E and playing that far down, then you would re-voice the chord not to be so muddy.

If you transpose up, things get plunky. Transpose down, they get muddy.

If you're a songwriter at home and you need to use transpose because you only know a handful of chords on the piano and it helps you to write a song - that's cool. But live, in performance? Recipe for aural disaster.

Complete opposite of what a capo is for. The stuff I hear guitarists play with a capo couldn't be done any other way. It's can be used as a facilitator, as well as a crutch.

Transpose on a keyboard? Solely a crutch.


Regards,
Frank
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLiRD808 ➡️

Man...love having to unsubscribe from my own threads
How long have you been here? Do you not know Jim Williams?

Most people here tune him out.

He always shows up in threads insulting people and suffers from a pretty bad case of, "Anything you can do, I can do better" syndrome.

Lol...I'd take his responses with a grain of salt.

Regards,
Frank
Old 17th September 2012 | Show parent
  #76
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by narcoman ➡️
A much harder instrument to play well... good bass players are worth their weight in coke.
Lol - You're still in the 80s, my friend! These days they want to get paid!

Seriously though, you hit the nail on the head. I have two specific bass players I like to call for sessions and if neither one is available, I seriously think of moving the session if possible. To me an excellent bass player is worth their weight in whatever substance they want!

To me, an excellent bass player can make or break the session, or rather that's been my experience.

Regards,
Frank
Old 18th September 2012
  #77
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Jeff Scott's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLiRD808 ➡️
...just cant really figure out why u'd knock two or more frets off ur neck.

What am i missing out on?
Franco Morone - Flowers from Ayako - YouTube

Franco Morone - Blind Mary/Planxty Irwin - YouTube

Running Home - Franco Morone - YouTube

Franco Morone & Ulli Boegershausen: For You - YouTube

That's just for a start!
Old 18th September 2012 | Show parent
  #78
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ionian ➡️
How long have you been here? Do you not know Jim Williams?

Most people here tune him out.

He always shows up in threads insulting people and suffers from a pretty bad case of, "Anything you can do, I can do better" syndrome.

Lol...I'd take his responses with a grain of salt.

Regards,
Frank
+1. In fact, make that a whole salt shaker.

I'm sure he doesn't care, but JW's attitude to most people make me question a) his security, seeing as he has to slate everybody else and b) his actual credibility regarding his mods and so on - slating a Neve preamp when you're known for modding cheap gear screams marketing to me. Likewise I'm not convinced he doesn't have an interest in the Ross Martin conversion, when he hypes it to high heaven, yet I've heard personally from a customer that it's not quite worthy of that hype (although I'm not disputing the value for money there).

I also struggle to see where he finds the time to do all this mod work AND be an engineer that works enough to justify his opinions...
Old 18th September 2012
  #79
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chrispick's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Also notable: You don't have to capo across the whole fretboard. Placing a capo on only some of the strings can help you come up with cool open chord configurations.
Old 18th September 2012
  #80
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Don't follow what I do. I have a small collection of capos, one for classical guitars, a couple of Kysers for acoustic guitars, and probably on of those old ones made with an elastic strap. I've gathered up this collection and put it in a Ziploc bag and stashed it in a Banker's box along with a couple of pedals that I never got into.

Depending on your style you may not need them. I've gotten into the habit of using my thumb more and playing chords with three or four fingers, as moveable as a barre chord but easier to get a few lead notes in there too.
Old 18th September 2012 | Show parent
  #81
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortingJack ➡️
The best guitars shouldn't have this problem.
A good tip is to place the capo very very close to the fret; the increased tension in that position will pull the string less, causing it to go out of tune a lot less than if you place the capo in the middle.
IMO, the key is to get a capo that matches your neck radius closely as possible, then put no more tension on it than needed to seat the strings to the fret. No tuning problems if you do this. That why I love the Shubb. I can micro adjust it so that it's not bending the strings down onto the wood.

The spring clamp jobs always create tuning problems unless you have an old Gibson Fretless Wonder.
Old 18th September 2012 | Show parent
  #82
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacktadoussac ➡️
Don't follow what I do. I have a small collection of capos, one for classical guitars, a couple of Kysers for acoustic guitars, and probably on of those old ones made with an elastic strap. I've gathered up this collection and put it in a Ziploc bag and stashed it in a Banker's box along with a couple of pedals that I never got into.

Depending on your style you may not need them. I've gotten into the habit of using my thumb more and playing chords with three or four fingers, as moveable as a barre chord but easier to get a few lead notes in there too.
Various jazz comping styles arose so that players could play without having to continually adjust their thinking around open strings and there's much to be said for it -- particularly in such a context, where improvisation and spur of the moment set changes can lead in all sorts of directions.

When I played a lot of electric guitar, the main time I used a capo would be if I wanted to use some open string technqiue. (I got into using capo on electric from seeing the aforementioned Gatemouth brown a number of times. There was a genuine, widely respected blues/swing guitarist who frequently used a capo -- and did it to great effect. Made sense to me.)

Now I see the capo less as a 'cheater' (though, for sure I use it that way when convenient) as something to allow me to exploit specific positions and sonorities, particularly when using tunings on my acoustic.
Old 18th September 2012 | Show parent
  #83
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro ➡️
IMO, the key is to get a capo that matches your neck radius closely as possible, then put no more tension on it than needed to seat the strings to the fret. No tuning problems if you do this. That why I love the Shubb. I can micro adjust it so that it's not bending the strings down onto the wood.

The spring clamp jobs always create tuning problems unless you have an old Gibson Fretless Wonder.
I have a Shubb for my flat fretboard guitars. (I had one for my arched fretboard guitars but the joint broke. It was not old or stressed and it kind of bummed me out.) I like the adjustability combined with the 'heavy' springiness. If I go more than a fret up or down when moving it, I always adjust the tension to the new position. I think it helps preserve strings (but I know I try to get too much use out of strings so I should stop thinking like that, maybe ). I also have an older Dunlop spring lever job. It does surprisingly well considering there are no adjustments besides the spring -- I've learned how to press it straight down with my finger and then ease the spring. But the levers on the back are pretty irritating.
Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #84
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Unclenny's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacktadoussac ➡️
I've gotten into the habit of using my thumb more and playing chords with three or four fingers, as moveable as a barre chord but easier to get a few lead notes in there too.
This I simply cannot believe! You actually use your thumb on the fretboard?

How do you live with the shame!!??

Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclenny ➡️
This I simply cannot believe! You actually use your thumb on the fretboard?

How do you live with the shame!!??

Uncle Lenny you're pulling my chain. All I'm saying is learn to play the damn guitar alright! Use barrechords if you must, use open tunings, wrap your thumb around the neck to save yourself from using barrechords.

Admittedly I have have seen Keith Richards play using a capo so it's OK. I just don't like the mandolinny sound. I've got a pair of 12th fret (to the body) guitars. I need some real estate, and I hate the way the capo screws up the tuning. It's a subpar accessory.
Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #86
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacktadoussac ➡️
..... I have have seen Keith Richards play using a capo so it's OK.
LOL, classic. Almost good enough to use for a sig. Proper idiocracy.
Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karloff70 ➡️
LOL, classic. Almost good enough to use for a sig. Proper idiocracy.
The purpose of this thread is to take the pee-pee out of other members because obviously it's your own damn business if you wish to play your guitar with training wheels. But, as I said, Keith uses them sparingly, and in his autobiography 'Life', written with the help of another dude, he mentions how they change the tone of a guitar (like a mandolin perhaps).

My annoyance with the capo is that I feel I need to retune the guitar the moment I spring it on. Certain guitar techniques, like the rhythm styles of Freddie Green or the jazzy disco playing of Nile Rodgers of Chic, these guys don't use capos (one of them is dead right so what can he do). You get more neck to play with, you ear gets used to the open strings, and as your technique improves you can take it higher and higher.
Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #88
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacktadoussac ➡️
The purpose of this thread is to take the pee-pee out of other members because obviously it's your own damn business if you wish to play your guitar with training wheels. But, as I said, Keith uses them sparingly, and in his autobiography 'Life', written with the help of another dude, he mentions how they change the tone of a guitar (like a mandolin perhaps).

My annoyance with the capo is that I feel I need to retune the guitar the moment I spring it on. Certain guitar techniques, like the rhythm styles of Freddie Green or the jazzy disco playing of Nile Rodgers of Chic, these guys don't use capos (one of them is dead right so what can he do). You get more neck to play with, you ear gets used to the open strings, and as your technique improves you can take it higher and higher.
Beautiful. You're still missing the point entirely.
Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #89
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theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacktadoussac ➡️
The purpose of this thread is to take the pee-pee out of other members because obviously it's your own damn business if you wish to play your guitar with training wheels. But, as I said, Keith uses them sparingly, and in his autobiography 'Life', written with the help of another dude, he mentions how they change the tone of a guitar (like a mandolin perhaps).

My annoyance with the capo is that I feel I need to retune the guitar the moment I spring it on. Certain guitar techniques, like the rhythm styles of Freddie Green or the jazzy disco playing of Nile Rodgers of Chic, these guys don't use capos (one of them is dead right so what can he do). You get more neck to play with, you ear gets used to the open strings, and as your technique improves you can take it higher and higher.
Maybe a capo is 'training wheels' for you.


But many quite accomplished guitarists have used them as a matter of course, as noted by a number of posters above.

Just because a given device doesn't fit what you do on the guitar is really no reason to insult those who have a different approach.

Is it?


PS... with regard to the intent of the OP -- taking the piss out of capo users may be how YOU interpreted the post but it looked to me like a guy who was willing to come in and say that maybe he didn't get it because he was a bass player so why don't folks explain the appeal of the capo... That strikes me as entirely different.

Mind you, I'm not trying to make you into any kind of villain, here. It's not like I feel mortally insulted (hey, I grew up calling them 'cheaters' myself) -- but it IS at the very least annoying to have so many cogent explanations of why one might use a capo -- even if he is an experienced, well-rounded guitarist who doesn't need 'training wheels' -- dismissed with a smirk and nothing much to back it up except personal preference, opinion, and, one suspects, willful ignorance of others' technical approaches.
Old 19th September 2012 | Show parent
  #90
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ionian's Avatar
 
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 ➡️
Maybe a capo is 'training wheels' for you.


But many quite accomplished guitarists have used them as a matter of course, as noted by a number of posters above.

Just because a given device doesn't fit what you do on the guitar is really no reason to insult those who have a different approach.

Is it?
Beautifully said.

Regards,
Frank
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