The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Is Digital Amp modeling the future of guitar tone?
Old 4th October 2011
  #31
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
The difference is that amp emulation is actually being used on a broad level at this point. Look at the Piano, a grand piano is clearly the better sounding instrument in a live situation, but it's not very practical to bring it around to gigs and extremely expensive to buy...in comes the electric/digital piano and now that is pretty much the standard.

That's what I'm saying, tube amps are going to be phased out or kept for a select few just like what happened with the piano.Tube amps carry the same burdens as a quality piano, they're too expensive, too large, require upkeep, subject to its acoustic environment.

If you suck, you suck, there's no arguing there, but at least people won't be able to blame it on their gear.
People use digital pianos for convenience. But every pianist touring at a high level uses a real grand - elton, tori, ms keys, even Jamie cullum. The digital piano is better than the alternative (the ropey house piano) but it's a choice made through necessity, not desire.

I like amp modellers as flavour, but for core tone I prefer amps, like most guitarists. I'd rather play live in a band with one good tone rather than a boxful of average ones, but I can see their place for covers, tributes and so on.

Technology isn't always the answer. Playing a digital piano feels nothing like a real piano, it'd the same for modelling amps and computer based sims. That musical response can't be emulated without weight and size of instrument, hence the reason real players aspire to real instruments. You don't see violinists aspiring to digital violins in place of their strads do you?!
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #32
Gear Guru
Yous guys are so lazy! I don't mind taking a rig to any gig. I can make it as big or small as I like.

Tiny rooms = Fender Champ modified to 12 watts.

Medium room = 1966 Fender Deluxe Reverb, modified to 80 watts. Hello!

Big room = 100 watt showman head, not too heavy or large to move.

Huge room = 120 watt Basson Sound stack w/ 480 watt 4x12 cab.

I have several cabs to choose from too. If I want to move air and not my back, the 100 watt Showman head with a small 1x12 Thiel cab with a Eminence Tonker will rattle your world. Easily heard 10 blocks away, it's been "tested".

Loading in my amp is like a relief pitcher running to the mound, it's a warm-up act. Better that than ANY cheesy simulator, I don't do cheese.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #33
Lives for gear
 
Enlightened Hand's Avatar
 
16 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
...Playing a digital piano feels nothing like a real piano...
I being a classical pianist who did indeed play competitions as a child disagree a bit with that.

I've never played a digital piano that feels exactly like the real thing. But then again, there are some that are pretty great and very similar in feel, though not exactly the same. And then there's the question of who's action you're referencing. A Steinway feels much different than an Estonia, which I happen to prefer, and which happens to be perhaps a bit closer to the better digital piano feels. Being 30 I'm not young enough to have been raised on digital pianos. I practiced exclusively on acoustic pianos throughout college. So it's not like I'm biased towards a digital piano feel.

All I'm saying is that DPs are not "nothing like a real piano" in feel. The best are pretty damn close. The same I think could be said for the recorded sound of amp sims.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams
...Better that than ANY cheesy simulator, I don't do cheese.
Maybe you should avoid "cheesy" simulators then. Because the good ones are quite good and not cheesy. No they're not exactly like the real thing and yes I prefer the real thing. But I object to the possible implication that amp sims in general are "cheesy" by default.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #34
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enlightened Hand ➡️
....I object to the possible implication that amp sims in general are "cheesy" by default.
Maybe not cheesy by default, but at least in my opinion, there is a "vibe" or "cool factor" or whatever you want to call it that is lost when one sees a performer onstage playing a digital instrument.

Even if the sound is "close" to the real deal that's being emulated, I just don't think it's all that appealing to watch a rock drummer playing V-Drums at a gig. I don't get inspired by watching a guitarist play through his Pod or Axe-FX or whatever. And my guess is that most players (unless they are committed musical technologists) would agree that the sim-instruments of whatever variety are not as inspiring to actually play either. What you gain in convenience -- and you do gain a lot in convenience -- you lose in earthiness, vibe, tactile immediacy, and yes, sound.

Maybe the importance people place on factors other than convenience and the appeal of technological novelty is a generational thing. I guess there's no real right or wrong. But I continue to have much respect for people who achieve their sound the hard way.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #35
Lives for gear
 
NEWTON IN ORBIT's Avatar
This topic comes up every month it seems like.

I'll cut to the chase----I don't like emulations. Been trying them since the late 80's. Digitech, Roland, Line 6 ....a whole slew of newer generation units, and software have come in the door too.

Maybe ok for live, but I wouldn't.

Everytime I have a client that wants to use these, I mention they can use a real amp if they want, and they sometimes insist on using their "rig". Then, I let them do a pass with a real amp off the clock.

95% of the time they are floored at the difference, as it sounds like what they have been trying to get for a very long time. Sometimes, they cannot hear the difference, but the rest of the band can.

This is the biggie. They cannot hear the difference, when it's in the context of their own sound. Also, there is a bit of a "It's good enough" crowd out there too.

It's these guys that usually call back a week later, either asking why they don't sound like their favorite band, and wanting you to "fix it", or asking if they can come back in and track it with a real tube amp.

Sometimes, it's a pride thing, and they must even borrow an amp from somebody else to bring in, to feel like they made a conscious decision on how their tone will end up. They do not want to use your amp, and add to the "I told you so" factor or whatever. I am just glad they are doing whatever needs to be done to get good tone.

No reason to use sims now, as you can get low wattage tube amps that:
a) Don't piss off the neighbors
b) Sound great. Even sound quite like a big amp.

As far as being on topic:

The only way sims are going to be the future, is if the accepted standard of a "good" guitar tone becomes that of an amp sim.

Just like mp3's are accepted as ok, it may (will?) happen , but it will suck a**.

I hope it never becomes accepted, as we already have taken so many hits on the fidelity front, not sure if we can take anymore.

My $0.02

john
Old 4th October 2011
  #36
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️

So do you think we will see an end to the conventional analog tube amp as the standard (live and studio) in this decade?
In this decade? No! Will there be a huge decline? Yes.

Will actual, tangible gear fizzle away to be replaced by virtual amps in the future? Yes!

I can guarantee in the next 50 years, guitar amps will be considered rare/classic/novelty/collectibles. The virtual processors will reign supreme.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #37
Lives for gear
 
Flying_Dutchman's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
i don´t think that guitar amps will become obsolete in the near future
of course the modelling amps made a huge step, but in realty the real sounds mix a lot better and i really see no reason for replacement, maybe the "recording at low level problem", but well, there are also some nice solutions
i don´t think this is an esotheric statemant, it´s just thatt the real amps cut through a mix an still sound alive, while the modellers sound flat, most of the time.
i also got some and use them sometimes, but i doubt i will ever sell my amps in the next years
peace
Old 4th October 2011
  #38
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enlightened Hand ➡️
I being a classical pianist who did indeed play competitions as a child disagree a bit with that.

I've never played a digital piano that feels exactly like the real thing. But then again, there are some that are pretty great and very similar in feel, though not exactly the same. And then there's the question of who's action you're referencing. A Steinway feels much different than an Estonia, which I happen to prefer, and which happens to be perhaps a bit closer to the better digital piano feels. Being 30 I'm not young enough to have been raised on digital pianos. I practiced exclusively on acoustic pianos throughout college. So it's not like I'm biased towards a digital piano feel.

All I'm saying is that DPs are not "nothing like a real piano" in feel. The best are pretty damn close. The same I think could be said for the recorded sound of amp sims.

Maybe you should avoid "cheesy" simulators then. Because the good ones are quite good and not cheesy. No they're not exactly like the real thing and yes I prefer the real thing. But I object to the possible implication that amp sims in general are "cheesy" by default.
Sorry, I wasn't clear. I meant you don't get the resonances of a real piano, not that you can't weight the keys correctly. Whether you play an upright or a grand piano, you can tell it's real. You play ivory through a great monitor system, it sounds like a great piano recording, but you don't get fooled you're playing a real piano - the keys don't vibrate your fingers, you don't resonate the room the same. The notes don't interact the same. Same thing for guitar amp sims, even the ones built into amp enclosures don't feel the same.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #39
Deleted 6ccb844
Guest
Here is the other thing, for the cost of the fractal axe fx.. You could buy a good amp and mic!!

Why settle for something that's trying to emulate the real thing when you could just buy the real thing?

As someone else say's, it's just being lazy.. I have a car to put my amp in, 99% of places I play mic the amp..

I have to carry it from the boot of my car to the front door!! See what I'm getting at?
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #40
Lives for gear
 
Enlightened Hand's Avatar
 
16 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey ➡️
Sorry, I wasn't clear. I meant you don't get the resonances of a real piano, not that you can't weight the keys correctly. Whether you play an upright or a grand piano, you can tell it's real. You play ivory through a great monitor system, it sounds like a great piano recording, but you don't get fooled you're playing a real piano - the keys don't vibrate your fingers, you don't resonate the room the same. The notes don't interact the same. Same thing for guitar amp sims, even the ones built into amp enclosures don't feel the same.
I agree with that.

I think that's why I prefer the real deal to amp sims or digital pianos. There is no replacing the feel. The feel is where a lot of the magic happens.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #41
Lives for gear
 
andersmv's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I think the future is going to be a hybrid between the two. Check out the new Line 6 DT amp series. It has 4 different amp models to choose from (Based off their new HD modeling) and a tube output stage. You can even switch between pentode and triode, class AB and A. I played a prototype of the new smaller 25 watt version of this amp and it was pretty awesome. I didn't try to crank of the volume on it, but at a moderate volume level, it sounded pretty great to me. A LOT better than their spider amps (Which I did not like at all). If you buy one of their new POD amp modeler pedals, you can even integrate it with the amp so that when you select any of the amp models in the POD, it will change the output stage setting accordingly to match the amp it is modeling.

Regardless of what you think about line 6 and your preference (I actually really liked the amp and was not expecting to), it's a pretty cool idea and I have a feeling a lot of other companies are going to follow suit.
Old 4th October 2011
  #42
Gear Maniac
 
craigdouglas's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Is Digital Amp modeling the future of guitar tone?

I hope not
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #43
Lives for gear
 
decocco's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
And think of how quickly someone could learn how to play if we used digital guitars (or drums/bass/piano etc)... You could play guitar hero /rock band or w/e game it'll be at the time, and actually play a real guitar with strings and get coached along.

The world would see the most insane guitarists ever if people learned how to play guitar properly at an early age and it was widely available and not just for those who are fortunate enough to have access to the gear and be in an environment where you can learn and practice your instrument.
I'm sorry, but this doesn't make any sense.

Decent quality guitars are widely available, and pretty cheap. You don't need some kind of expensive guitar and amp to develop proper tone. You need a cheap acoustic guitar that doesn't totally suck, and you need to dedicate yourself to learning the skill of playing the guitar. You will need a good teacher, but most of those aren't all that expensive either. The only environment that's required is a place that's big enough for you to sit down in, and isn't so loud as to overpower the instrument (you would not want to practice in the engine room of a cruise ship, for example).

Most people suck cuz they lack discipline, not cuz there aren't good guitars and teachers available.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #44
Registered User
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor ➡️
Maybe not cheesy by default, but at least in my opinion, there is a "vibe" or "cool factor" or whatever you want to call it that is lost when one sees a performer onstage playing a digital instrument...
OK - i'll bite ...

Fact is: audiences have been fooled by towers of amps and speakers for generations now. How often have the big name players had gear on stage as props for show (probably endorsement deals), and the *real* sound comes from a small amp under the stage. (IIRC, I believe AC/DC, Neil Young, Stones etc have done this and it's fairly well documented).

I fully understand the visual fashion statement thing: that's another subject, for another day in another forum.

But music is about the performance, and gear is just gear that has a job to do and not get in the way.

The future of guitar has to be wireless - even for recording. Cables suck, and the EMI environment is only going to get worse. Assuming we stay with magnetic pups (big assumption) then the electronics need to be housed inside a faraday cage. If the signal could go direct to a high quality A/D, and then be transmitted digitally via wireless we could avoid a lot of problems both on stage and in the studio. Recording to a DAW and reamping later would be a breeze - no need for DI, Preamp etc.

A tube amp is a very simple electronic device, and the behaviour of each component can be modeled extremely accurately. The fact is, right at the moment, CPUs are not grunty enough to model more than maybe a single stage. The algorithmns are heavily compromised, and the developers are very aware of this. If they had more CPU, they could get closer to the real interaction of all the components.

Crystal ball gazing: in 5 years time, you'll have guitar amp software that allows you to experiment with the actual circuit design. You'll be able to replace resistors, capacitors, tubes - even transformers. The sound will be indistinguishable from the real circuits in blind A/B tests - and you'll be able to remove the annoying features such as hiss & hum (or maximise them if you take perverse pleasure in these things).

Give it time ... it's going to happen. And you'll love it. And besides, you won't be able to afford real tubes anyway.

The amp modeling & FX may as well be on board the guitar, where you can tweak it. Optionally. Because in many applications it would be better to send a dry mono signal. But with wireless digital - you could have options for all applications.

I can also see the integration of personal monitoring, and vocal/instrument/backing track/training/recording features all being built into guitars.

We need designers with a new aesthetic to make this stuff be cool.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #45
Lives for gear
 
NEWTON IN ORBIT's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi ➡️
Give it time ... it's going to happen. And you'll love it. And besides, you won't be able to afford real tubes anyway.
Both of these sentences are severely depressing.

As far as the "crystal ball gazing part" ?

I'll believe it when I hear it.

j
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #46
Lives for gear
 
decocco's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
The difference is that amp emulation is actually being used on a broad level at this point. Look at the Piano, a grand piano is clearly the better sounding instrument in a live situation, but it's not very practical to bring it around to gigs and extremely expensive to buy...in comes the electric/digital piano and now that is pretty much the standard.
Yeah, but it sounds bad compared to a real piano. Electric pianos are NOT the same thing as digital pianos as they are really electro-acoustic instruments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
That's what I'm saying, tube amps are going to be phased out or kept for a select few just like what happened with the piano.Tube amps carry the same burdens as a quality piano, they're too expensive, too large, require upkeep, subject to its acoustic environment.
Tube amps come in all shapes and sizes (just like pianos). Buy a small one if you only play small rooms and don't wanna lug a big one around. Also, I expect the instruments I play to be subject to the acoustic environment. I mean, it is MUSIC we're talking about. You're digital amp is still going to produce a SOUND at some point, right? This sound will be subject to the acoustic environment. Or is the audience listening on headphones?heh

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
If you suck, you suck, there's no arguing there, but at least people won't be able to blame it on their gear.
Who is blaming suckage on their gear? People who actually suck. Good musicians sound good even with bad gear. No one will believe you played the solo in the wrong key because your Squier Starcaster made you do it. It's not the gear's fault.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #47
Lives for gear
 
decocco's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi ➡️
OK - i'll bite ...
The future of guitar has to be wireless - even for recording. Cables suck...
IMHO cables do not suck. Broken cables suck. Good cables do exactly what they are supposed to do. Cables are a very simple solution to a very simple problem. Wireless is rather complicated and prone to problems by comparison.

Wireless is putting fashion ahead of function.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #48
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
theoretically there's no reason why not.

there are a bunch of times lately in the studio where i prefer certain sounds on Waves GTR.

i'm not a famous guitarist, nor do i have a million-dollar room. but the studio does have a half dozen nice tube amps of the Mesa, Fender, Vox, Orange varieties, as well as a bunch of good mics to mic them up with.

i will say this though- i was playing some gigs in a band with a dude who showed up with an amp head, laptop, PT, and some multiFX floorboard pedal.

it was a total cluster****. setup time took forever and there were invariably all sorts of glitches to sort out.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #49
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by decocco ➡️
I'm sorry, but this doesn't make any sense.

Decent quality guitars are widely available, and pretty cheap. You don't need some kind of expensive guitar and amp to develop proper tone. You need a cheap acoustic guitar that doesn't totally suck, and you need to dedicate yourself to learning the skill of playing the guitar. You will need a good teacher, but most of those aren't all that expensive either. The only environment that's required is a place that's big enough for you to sit down in, and isn't so loud as to overpower the instrument (you would not want to practice in the engine room of a cruise ship, for example).

Most people suck cuz they lack discipline, not cuz there aren't good guitars and teachers available.
True decent guitars are cheap enough that most anybody could afford one if they wanted to, however my main point was education. Let's say that wii or xbox released a game in the near future with a variax type guitar, it could allow noobs to learn the basic chords and proper techniques and save months or years of trial and error.

See my old man for instance played guitar but he hated the style of music I played and I hated the style of music he played so he couldn't teach me anything useful to me at that point. If I pay an instructor I may be learning proper technique but I might loose interest because of the weak content i.e. force you to play old fart music or music that doesn't appeal to you.

That's the beauty of this idea, you could play whatever music style you wanted to learn about and users could upload their own tabs. It would be super cool if the digital guitar could tab out songs for you! Man the songs I could write!

Who knows, maybe one day we'll see it. I'm sure that it's already in the works to some degree.
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #50
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams ➡️
Yous guys are so lazy! I don't mind taking a rig to any gig. I can make it as big or small as I like.
...
I totally agree and have been using small amps since the 80s, but there is -nothing- like standing in front of 24 twelve inch speakers. It's not a matter of volume.

In these days of in ear monitors, I'm with Robert Scovill in that the amps don't even need to be on stage. And when we are hearing them through in-ears with a whole mix, will we be able to tell the differences that are so meaningful to us? I don't know. Fortunately, I'm in the 'small if not tiny' club situation at best these days, so my vintage/boutique stuff has value to my sound and to getting my juices flowing. (I spend more time playing acoustic guitars in peoples living rooms....)
Old 4th October 2011 | Show parent
  #51
Lives for gear
 
decocco's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
See my old man for instance played guitar but he hated the style of music I played and I hated the style of music he played so he couldn't teach me anything useful to me at that point. If I pay an instructor I may be learning proper technique but I might loose interest because of the weak content i.e. force you to play old fart music or music that doesn't appeal to you.
I'm talking about true music education. I believe you are talking about learning guitar for fun. Anyone with a real education and understanding of their instrument can play songs (and other forms of music) of any era. Of course, people specialize. But that doesn't mean they aren't familiar with and capable of playing a variety of styles at least somewhat proficiently.

If you really want to learn an instrument (and master it), you are going to have to learn some old music (I mean like hundreds of years old, not just stuff from the '60s).

Last edited by decocco; 4th October 2011 at 11:56 PM.. Reason: clarity
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #52
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
True decent guitars are cheap enough that most anybody could afford one if they wanted to, however my main point was education. Let's say that wii or xbox released a game in the near future with a variax type guitar, it could allow noobs to learn the basic chords and proper techniques and save months or years of trial and error.
All these learning aids are available, and have been for years. Books, DVDs, youtube lessons (a chap I know called Justin puts loads of free professional lessons up on his youtube channel), it's all out there. Most kids essentially want instant gratification, which is why guitar hero is so popular. For the price of an Xbox and the game, they could get a £100 guitar (which is perfectly sufficient to learn on), a practice amp and a bunch of accessories. Which is exactly what the devoted ones do - and the rest just want to play a computer game.

There are plenty of kids learning instruments. The only thing that's hard is drums - you either need the space and isolation for a real (cheap) kit, or a (relatively expensive, less realistic) electronic kit. But that's always been the case - every school band struggles with drummers!
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #53
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams ➡️
Yous guys are so lazy! I don't mind taking a rig to any gig. I can make it as big or small as I like.

Tiny rooms = Fender Champ modified to 12 watts.

Medium room = 1966 Fender Deluxe Reverb, modified to 80 watts. Hello!

Big room = 100 watt showman head, not too heavy or large to move.

Huge room = 120 watt Basson Sound stack w/ 480 watt 4x12 cab.

I have several cabs to choose from too. If I want to move air and not my back, the 100 watt Showman head with a small 1x12 Thiel cab with a Eminence Tonker will rattle your world. Easily heard 10 blocks away, it's been "tested".

Loading in my amp is like a relief pitcher running to the mound, it's a warm-up act. Better that than ANY cheesy simulator, I don't do cheese.

No, it's not a matter of laziness, believe me I move large objects all the time on my job, it's a matter of protecting your investment. It's very hard on the equipment lugging it around and potentially dropping it or banging it up when you move it from point A to point B. And then once you've arrive to your destination, you're setting it up in a dirty, nasty venue where other musicians sweat, spit, spill beer etc etc, on stage.

Those are nice amps you've listed, but you're clearly not a starving musician so you wouldn't understand. Sure a Mesa boogie Mark 3 (for example) amp is currently much better sounding than a line 6 pod, but you can't record riffs in your apartment at 3:30am while you're neighbors are sleeping with a huge 100w monstrosity. That's my point... more and more 'apartment rockstars' or 'bedroom virtuosos' are writing their next albums with these pods because A. they can afford it B. they can use it whenever they want C. they can dial in a pretty good tone and record stuff for free and show their band mates or put it on myspace etc.

So if more and more people are getting accustomed to using their pods at home and tweaking out the settings and trying new combinations day in and day out, eventually (2-5 years I'd say) the tone will be better for different reasons than you'd might think.

I predict that in the next couple of years, based on the popularity of these pods, that all sorts of new guitar tones will come and they will be only available through the use of your PC and would be considered undesirable, inefficient, or strange to want to recreate your digital setup with the use a standard tube amp because of the cost factor of the amp and rack effects, cables logistics and time it takes to setup. It wouldn't make sense.

Apple made a better OS than Microsoft in the early 90's, but Microsoft made the OS more readily and widely available and that became the standard which is more important or more popular than being the best.
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #54
Lives for gear
 
oceantracks's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
"but you can't record riffs in your apartment at 3:30am while you're neighbors are sleeping with a huge 100w monstrosity"

Yes you can with a Palmer!

TH
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #55
Gear Maniac
 
Traintrack's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Still waiting on the Flying Car...


Give me some of that 6L6 honk
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #56
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey ➡️
All these learning aids are available, and have been for years. Books, DVDs, youtube lessons (a chap I know called Justin puts loads of free professional lessons up on his youtube channel), it's all out there. Most kids essentially want instant gratification, which is why guitar hero is so popular. For the price of an Xbox and the game, they could get a £100 guitar (which is perfectly sufficient to learn on), a practice amp and a bunch of accessories. Which is exactly what the devoted ones do - and the rest just want to play a computer game.

There are plenty of kids learning instruments. The only thing that's hard is drums - you either need the space and isolation for a real (cheap) kit, or a (relatively expensive, less realistic) electronic kit. But that's always been the case - every school band struggles with drummers!
Sure but think of the power of software... Imagine learning how to play the blues and it lets you know when you're fingers aren't in the right position or you aren't strumming properly for example. Proper error correction is what a good teacher can teach you that a youtube video can't.

You can watch educational satriani videos all you want but if you don't practice it, and have someone coach, inspire and error correct you, then you'll probably won't get *that much better at playing guitar. If you play with musicians who are bright and creative and know different tricks than you and vice versa, then you sponge off each other.
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #57
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traintrack ➡️
Still waiting on the Flying Car...


Give me some of that 6L6 honk
Guitar Rising for Real Guitar Heroes

This is a good start to what I've been describing but I'm sort next-leveling it.
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #58
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceantracks ➡️
"but you can't record riffs in your apartment at 3:30am while you're neighbors are sleeping with a huge 100w monstrosity"

Yes you can with a Palmer!

TH
$$$$$$
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #59
Registered User
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Which 6L6? Tubes are very variable - and while there is a certain appeal in having a box of NOS tubes and a pair of oven mitts to swap them out, it's really something from a bygone era.

When the digital modelling actually gets to the stage i'm talkin about (true modeling of each component - which is possible today, but stalls a modern 8 core PC) ... you'll be able to swap out virtual tubes and get exactly the tone you want.

Plus - it's fairly well known that tubes sound best right before they blow ... you could model a tube right on the verge of blowing, and have that sound always ...

This applies to all analog gear - they've only just begun, and processing speed is the hurdle at the moment but that increases exponentially all the time ...

I agree that modeling is not there yet. But it's close enough for many applications, and it has to get better.
Old 5th October 2011 | Show parent
  #60
Gear Addict
 
Bristol Posse's Avatar
 
5 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattvdh ➡️
..Imagine learning how to play the blues and it lets you know when you're fingers aren't in the right position or you aren't strumming properly for example.
.
Anything that showed you this sure as hell wouldn't be showing you how to play the blues. That's all about doing it wrong!
This might be a good way to be the next big thing in the high stakes game of elevator muzak though
Closed

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 665 views: 134599
Avatar for Raaphorst
Raaphorst 17th November 2016
replies: 681 views: 90752
Avatar for Tim Farrant
Tim Farrant 7th July 2011
replies: 100 views: 10959
Avatar for Riccardo
Riccardo 25th November 2013
replies: 153 views: 28790
Avatar for Angus V
Angus V 21st January 2020

Forum Jump
Forum Jump