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purist 2 mics vs spot micing setups?
Old 27th January 2013 | Show parent
  #31
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelPatrick ➡️
Low impedance terminations and lots of transformers helped them keep common-mode noise down. But in those days the audio bandwidth was limited, overall noise was higher and dynamic range was lower compared with today. Of course, the recording media, playback systems and listener expectations were also quite different.
Agreed
But it is amazing that they could work at -80 dB levels and send for very long distance
Optical recording was noisy and they worked on noise reduction with better film stocks and gates
Bandwidth was 10 KHz,some of those sound tracks sound brilliant ,even after 5 generations and a dub.
Modern noise reduction has revealed many gems.
Hats off to Westrex (Chief Engineer was Stanley Watkins, a Brit,he wired American stages and afterwards Europe and trained the first generation of sound recordists)
Roger
Old 27th January 2013
  #32
Gear Head
 
🎧 5 years
To say something ontopic:

I have experiences as a singer with multiple engineers. The best recordings were the recordings made with stereo AB.
The most horribele was the one made with 8 microphones. Couldn't determine one single 'official' technique other than some strange AB things.

Also, I get very good results with my omni pair in AB50 (DPA 2006c).

0,02
Old 27th January 2013 | Show parent
  #33
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boojum's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
In the best of all possible worlds a two mic array would do the deal. Problem is we are rarely in the best of all possible worlds. If only there were a plethora of Concertgebouws. At least one for everybody. I wish.
Old 5th February 2013
  #34
Gear Addict
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman ➡️
i used to do pretty much only 2-track (mostly just a ORTF pair) for piano duos and small ensemble work. after recognizing that the results often did not sound like commercial recordings, i switched to using a stereo pair of omnis on piano and a c414b-uls on the soloist. then i started adding an ORTF pair into the setup - 5 mics for a piano duo type recording. string quartets mostly an AB pair of omnis with spots on cello and maybe the violin.

i just got a copy of the royer CD where they had recorded an orchestra with just the SF12 and no spots, and it sounded wonderfully natural to me, which makes me rethink all the spot micing i have been doing, and even the idea that i should be trying to match commercial CD sound for piano duos.

there is a mix of 2 channel purists here along with those who tend more toward multi-spot micing, and those who use main pairs with multiple spots.

i would be interested to hear your philosophy on pure 2 channel vs multi-micing vs main pair plus spots for duos and small ensemble work, and i would laso like to hear your opinions on whether we, as live recordists, should be trying to mimic the sound of commercial CDs with our work.

thanks.
I'm coming to this thread a little late but the title caught my attention.

I am a classical musician by profession and am an amateur "recording engineer" but the companies that employ minimalist recording techniques usually sound best to my ear. I love the "live" quality.

Perhaps you heard of Direct-to-Tape Recording Company. If not, I recommend listening to some other recordings at their website.

Also, one of my favorite record labels is Maple Shade.
Old 7th February 2013 | Show parent
  #35
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelPatrick ➡️
Short as it can be. But being practical, for lengths of 25' or less, cable quality matters as much as length. Ideally the cable will be 12' to 18' - just enough to come down the stand into a preamp.

50', IMO, is too long for a ribbon motor to drive. Yes, it can sometimes work just fine, but the noise goes up significantly along with the risk of RF and EMI. Cable quality and solid XLR connections are vitally important any time ribbons are used.

It's possible with the DAV BG1 to clamp the preamp to the stand by attaching a clamp or two to the unit via captive bolts, the heads of which are held by the groove on the base. Blimey, I hope that's clear!

That way you could have cables almost as short as you like, say a foot or two.
Old 7th February 2013
  #36
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jnorman's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
so, you bolt the captive grooves into the cables by their heads, and then clamp the attachment to the preamp with short units? crystal clear. thanks!
Old 7th February 2013 | Show parent
  #37
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman ➡️
so, you bolt the captive grooves into the cables by their heads, and then clamp the attachment to the preamp with short units? crystal clear. thanks!
I'm still confused. A picture would be nice.
Old 7th February 2013
  #38
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jnorman's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
assembly schematic:
Attached Thumbnails
purist 2 mics vs spot micing setups?-dav-stand-assembly-instructions.jpg  
Old 7th February 2013 | Show parent
  #39
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman ➡️
assembly schematic:
Thanks. Too bad the DAV needs external power.
Old 7th February 2013
  #40
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MichaelPatrick's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
How about these?

FetHead - tritonaudio
http://sanken.ch/pdf/HAD_48_Lit_English_040426.pdf
Cloudlifter CL-1 | Cloud Microphones | "Elevate Your Sound"

At the base of the mic stand, a remote controlled amp like this is ideal:
Gordon Microphone Preamplifier System

Other remote controlled preamps might also work well.

And there are always "active" ribbon mics like AEA A840, Royer R-122, SF-2, SF-24, Audio-Technica AT4080, and some vacuum tube varieties.
Old 7th February 2013
  #41
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DCtoDaylight's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by shosty ➡️
I'm coming to this thread a little late but the title caught my attention.

I am a classical musician by profession and am an amateur "recording engineer" but the companies that employ minimalist recording techniques usually sound best to my ear. I love the "live" quality.

Perhaps you heard of Direct-to-Tape Recording Company. If not, I recommend listening to some other recordings at their website.

Also, one of my favorite record labels is Maple Shade.
Thanks for the tips!

MA Recordings is in the single-pair business too. Their Bach Orgelbuchlein by Ensemble Mare Nostrum is phenomenal - I don't know of a more transporting recording.


http://www.marecordings.com/main/pro...roducts_id=137
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