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Portable Location Recording Rates?
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #31
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Thomas W. Bethe's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
I seldom, if ever, do a remote recording without going to the venue before hand preferable at the time of the remote recording.

Early in my career I did a recording at a remote church of an organ recital. This church was literally in the middle of a corn field. Nothing around it. I did a walk through with the minister about a week early and did not see any problems. This recital was attended by people in the church and was scheduled to start about 4:30 pm. At 5 pm a very loud very low Super 18 twin radial engine plane came over and rattled the windows and obliterated the recital. We were able to redo the piece afterward but in talking to the people of the church I found out that this was a daily occurrence and that the plane was from a local airport and was going north to Detroit Michigan to deliver canceled checks and he flew with such precision that he always came over at the same time. The minister had not mentioned it when I asked about outside noises and when questioned after the service/recital he said "oh I guess I did not think about Henry's plane" Turns out that the pilot was a member in good standing of the church and used the church as a turning point on his trek North since he was flying VFR. So NOW I go to the venue before the concert and listen to what is happening at the time of the concert.

You never know what kinds of problems you will run into so it is always a good idea to check out the venue beforehand. It also helps if you have someone from the venue to tell you about local customs, fire codes and outlet locations.

I think all the help and suggestions you have received have been very good. I would only add two suggestions.

Checkout your whole recording setup before you get to the venue. Make sure you have extra microphone cables, gaffers tape and extension cords as you never know when you might need them. Try to arrive early and get everything setup about an hour before the concert and then relax. It does not help you or the recording if you are rushed and when you are rushed things happen that may make it impossible to get a good recording and the extra time will give you a cushion of time to relax and to solve problems if they rear their ugly heads.

Best of luck!
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #32
Lives for gear
 
jpupo74's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by audio ergo sum ➑️
No need to apologize. I just think it wouldn't matter if the recording did not materialize in the end. If it would matter, they should have asked a specialist.
Hi,

People are trying to help!
:-)
The question is:
Do you want to be a specialist?
If it's your first gig, then try to do things the right way...
or
Let your client know that if something happens to your main system, you are not going to be able to deliver a final product.

Cheers,
Pupo
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #33
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpupo74 ➑️
...
The question is:
Do you want to be a specialist?
...
And the next question is:
Can you be a specialist, just because you want to?

In the future yes, nobody was born as a specialist. But I have problems with todays mentality of "just getting the job done". What happens is a lot of so called "professionals" that are not much more than impersonators of professionals. It goes through the whole society, it's a very American thing.

Waiters who are actually waiter impersonators.
Car mechanics who are actually car mechanics impersonators.
Gardeners who are gardener impersonators.
Recording engineers who are recording engineer impersonators.

I just hate that superficiality, sorry...

P.S. This is not targeted at the thread opener. He never pretended to be a professional.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #34
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joelpatterson's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
So... are you really a poster on Gearslutz, or are you just impersonating one?
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #35
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Plush's Avatar
 
5 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
With the "democratization" of recording with its cheap $299 digital recorder and ********M mics, is it any wonder that there are impersonators out there?

Combine the above with people young and old who won't ask for a worthwhile fee and you have a sub-culture of the unknowing.

Certainly this is not confined to American recordists either.

5-8 years of working as much as you can is the MINIMUM prerequisite to learning to be a pro.

If you aim to work full time in this craft, make sure you charge enough to drive a really nice automobile, eat healthy, have good health insurance and good gear insurance. Charge enough to take nice vacations with your significant other too.

Otherwize you a slave and a fool. . .

p.s.--don't fall into the engineer trap of being unbathed either!
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #36
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson ➑️
So... are you really a poster on Gearslutz, or are you just impersonating one?
__________________
Mountaintop Studios
~the peak of perfection~
Will I ever reach the peak of perfection?
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #37
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staudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plush ➑️
5-8 years of working as much as you can is the MINIMUM prerequisite to learning to be a pro.

If you aim to work full time in this craft, make sure you charge enough to drive a really nice automobile, eat healthy, have good health insurance and good gear insurance. Charge enough to take nice vacations with your significant other too.

Otherwize you a slave and a fool. . .

p.s.--don't fall into the engineer trap of being unbathed either!
This is very good advice.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #38
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Sound advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plush ➑️
With the "democratization" of recording with its cheap $299 digital recorder and ********M mics, is it any wonder that there are impersonators out there?

Combine the above with people young and old who won't ask for a worthwhile fee and you have a sub-culture of the unknowing.

Certainly this is not confined to American recordists either.

5-8 years of working as much as you can is the MINIMUM prerequisite to learning to be a pro.

If you aim to work full time in this craft, make sure you charge enough to drive a really nice automobile, eat healthy, have good health insurance and good gear insurance. Charge enough to take nice vacations with your significant other too.

Otherwize you a slave and a fool. . .

p.s.--don't fall into the engineer trap of being unbathed either!
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #39
Gear Nut
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Recording engineers who are recording engineer impersonators.
What do you call someone who graduates last in their class at medical school?

Doctor

At what point does is the mantle of "recording engineer" bestowed upon someone who records music professionally? An interesting thought: if you are paid to do something, you are a professional. Just because you are a professional does not necessarily mean that you are any good at what you do. Hopefully, Darwinian Capitalism weeds out those who do not meet a certain standard, but this does not make one any more or less "professional" in this sense of the word. If you botch a number of gigs, people will eventually stop hiring you.

That being said, if this is a paying gig, I would not want to have to tell the client that a recording "did not materialize" because I did not have a plan B. If plan A and plan B both go down the toilet, then you might get away with chalking it up to having a really bad day (even then...).

I don't mean to pick on the original poster, but an attitude like "it doesn't matter if the recording happens" does not bode well for a long career. Even if the client doesn't care, you should. That's your job, if you are being paid.

Just my $.000000002 (adjusted for inflation)
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #40
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by locosoundman ➑️
What do you call someone who graduates last in their class at medical school?
As I said, they are everywhere. Even though just getting into a medical school and making it to the final exams should be a barrier to keep out the total failures.
Quote:
That being said, if this is a paying gig, I would not want to have to tell the client that a recording "did not materialize" because I did not have a plan B. If plan A and plan B both go down the toilet, then you might get away with chalking it up to having a really bad day (even then...).

I don't mean to pick on the original poster, but an attitude like "it doesn't matter if the recording happens" does not bode well for a long career. Even if the client doesn't care, you should. That's your job, if you are being paid.
Sure, this is off topic now, since that is not what the original question was. An amateur asking how much he can charge for providing a service that is a little bit more than just a courtesy.

The special problem with the recording business is, that even the top level professionals suffer, since a lot of amateurs impersonate a professional on the lower level and there is a trickle up effect and dumping rates asked for certain jobs that are not by the logistics alone exclusive professional territory.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #41
Gear Guru
 
joelpatterson's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by audio ergo sum ➑️
Will I ever reach the peak of perfection?
That's up to you.

Of course, it would be appropos if your studio name had some kind of "mountain" reference, and then see the "peak" allusion is a kind of clever, crafted... oh forget it.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #42
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tnjazz's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by locosoundman ➑️
Just because you are a professional does not necessarily mean that you are any good at what you do.
This is true. I see it every day in this town.


Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #43
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by locosoundman ➑️
...Just because you are a professional does not necessarily mean that you are any good at what you do...
That's the down side of a free market capitalism. If the people who hire or give jobs don't know much about the trade, they tend to go by other factors. Credits (hard to verify), social interaction, general appearance.

Unfortunately the free market definition of "good" is what sells well. There is no rule of a "council of enlightened masters" who would judge based on the real skills.

If you can communicate and market yourself well in the audio world you can get pretty far, it is scary. And this forum gives those people even more ammunition. Real excellency and knowledge was in history of mankind usually achieved in elitist guilds that had strict rules about who could enter or not, based on their achievements.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #44
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NorseHorse's Avatar
Lightbulb Whoa there... not everyone is in the same Market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plush ➑️
Combine the above with people young and old who won't ask for a worthwhile fee and you have a sub-culture of the unknowing.
Plush, you make it sound as if Engineers get to set their own rates and gigs just like that. It isn't the engineers, it's the Market that determines whether you are going to get work at a specific price or not. You've been doing this for a long time and you have a very "high-end" client base -- your market is SIGNIFICANTLY different than many other engineers on this thread. The markets I operate in COULD NOT support and WOULD NOT currently support your prices.

As my client base grows, recording schedule grows, and geographic area expands, I will also be able to raise my rates, but please don't bash on "people young and old" who won't ask for what you consider a worthwhile fee. I've built a decent business on what you probably wouldn't consider "worthwhile fees", and I couldn't have done it otherwise. Thanks!

So... getting back to the original post. If you don't have much experience with location recording and you aren't operating a back-up recorder, $150 would probably make it worth both your whiles. If the recitalist seems wealthy, maybe shoot for $250 or $350.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #45
Lives for gear
 
Corran's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Yeah, the market also has something to do with it. Am I an idiot for charging $100 for a student recital recording of 1 hour? Well if I charged more I simply wouldn't get the gig. I am happy to do this. I am currently raising my rates but these types of things don't get raised due to the client's unability to pay it!

However when I am dealing with professional institutions I am charging much more. For the gig in question, I did a full opera sound mixing gig a few weeks ago. 3 nights, $500. I feel that was a good pay and am happy to have it secured as far into the future as one can imagine it going on.

In other news, I was completely correct in my assessment of audio ergo sum's need to post that quote whenever possible! I think this is starting to be what one might call "harrassment."
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #46
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Come on, just a little teasing between adults. He is asking for it with his motto. Is that not ok, not PC?
BTW, he started it.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #47
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorseHorse ➑️
Plush, you make it sound as if Engineers get to set their own rates and gigs just like that. It isn't the engineers, it's the Market that determines whether you are going to get work at a specific price or not. You've been doing this for a long time and you have a very "high-end" client base -- your market is SIGNIFICANTLY different than many other engineers on this thread. The markets I operate in COULD NOT support and WOULD NOT currently support your prices.
I believe this is true for my area as well.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #48
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
OK. So now the cats out of the bag.
You may find this funny.

The client is now an opera singer who prior to attending school as a vocal performance major got a SOUND ENGINEERING DEGREE FROM FULLSAIL.

He will be preforming this thing three different times in two different locations.

This sound like a headache to anyone else.

OH yeah also the school will be paying someone to record him with their equipment as well.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #49
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sctt_stone ➑️
...

The client is now an opera singer who prior to attending school as a vocal performance major got a SOUND ENGINEERING DEGREE FROM FULLSAIL.

...
So, why don't you sing and he records it? heh
Do the Florence Foster Jenkins recordings of the 21st century!

P.S. I'm afraid already done:
YouTube - Florence Foster Jenkins 2006

Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #50
Gear Guru
 
joelpatterson's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
It's not harassment until someone lets loose with the Photoshop....
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #51
Gear Guru
 
joelpatterson's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
.... which is probably going to be me, anyway.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #52
Gear Addict
 
ZEBRAAA's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
for me as a beginner, if prefer to ask less and get more recordings to get more experience and most of all its real fun to go on location. more fun then in the studio.

im on rme, got aea, brauner, oktava, i also can rent neumann, but i add it to the price.

a weeknd recording (mixing in the price) and i give 50cdrs, to push them to do more promoes with my little duplication plant. if they want days extra to record i ask a little more. so far i come to 300 to 500€.

but i think to being pro i need to invest easely 20000€ xtra and 5 more years of looots of recording.

but so far now im happy got big smile and hell yea im an amature with proffesional attitude (hopefully).

greetz
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #53
Lives for gear
 
jpupo74's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by audio ergo sum ➑️
And the next question is:
Can you be a specialist, just because you want to?

In the future yes, nobody was born as a specialist. But I have problems with todays mentality of "just getting the job done". What happens is a lot of so called "professionals" that are not much more than impersonators of professionals. It goes through the whole society, it's a very American thing.

Waiters who are actually waiter impersonators.
Car mechanics who are actually car mechanics impersonators.
Gardeners who are gardener impersonators.
Recording engineers who are recording engineer impersonators.

I just hate that superficiality, sorry...

P.S. This is not targeted at the thread opener. He never pretended to be a professional.
Hi audio ergo sum,

To be honest, my English kills me when I read something like this since it's not my first language. I really don't understand what you're trying to say...

I just tried to give my advice, pushing him forward to do things the right way from the beginning. For me, it's the right way to do things. As always, YMMV.

Cheers,
Pupo
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #54
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorseHorse ➑️
Plush, you make it sound as if Engineers get to set their own rates and gigs just like that. It isn't the engineers, it's the Market that determines whether you are going to get work at a specific price or not. You've been doing this for a long time and you have a very "high-end" client base -- your market is SIGNIFICANTLY different than many other engineers on this thread. The markets I operate in COULD NOT support and WOULD NOT currently support your prices.

As my client base grows, recording schedule grows, and geographic area expands, I will also be able to raise my rates, but please don't bash on "people young and old" who won't ask for what you consider a worthwhile fee. I've built a decent business on what you probably wouldn't consider "worthwhile fees", and I couldn't have done it otherwise. Thanks!

So... getting back to the original post. If you don't have much experience with location recording and you aren't operating a back-up recorder, $150 would probably make it worth both your whiles. If the recitalist seems wealthy, maybe shoot for $250 or $350.
I completely disagree with your statement.

I, as a recording engineer/producer set my own rates just like that!
I have never let the market determine what I'm worth.
If I like (and believe in) the project and it's below my rate I may do the date anyway.
BUT, it's not about the economics at that point.
It never was and it will never be.

IMO, every market, "high-end" or "low-end" has their share of the penny pinching client base.
You have to decide whether it's worth the hassle to get involved with that project.
Are they cutting corners because they don't have the bread or are they cutting corners to make themselves fatter with all the extra bread they're pocketing?
This is a decision that must be made when evaluating and bidding on the potential project.

I have noticed two thing in the 33 plus years I've been doing this thingy.
  • You're only as good as your last gig.
  • When I raised my rates to get rid of some low-end clients I ended up not only loosing the clients I wanted to get rid of, but got many more clients due to my new higher rates.

Many folks will not even consider working with you if your numbers don't fit their window.
Now that doesn't mean all you have to do is raise your rates and everything will be everything!
You still have to back up your rate with the proper quality service and deliverables.

---------

Whether you have or don't have location recording experience you still must employ a backup recorder of some sort.
IMO, it should be equal in track count and quality as the main recording system.
Anything else is not a back up to the main system.
PERIOD; END OF DISCUSSION!
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #55
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by locosoundman ➑️
...An interesting thought: if you are paid to do something, you are a professional. ...
It is interesting to see the transformation of the term "professional" over the ages.

profession c.1225, "vows taken upon entering a religious order," from O.Fr. profession, from L. professionem (nom. professio) "public declaration," from professus (see profess). Meaning "occupation one professes to be skilled in" is from 1541; meaning "body of persons engaged in some occupation" is from 1610; as a euphemism for "prostitution" (e.g. oldest profession) it is recorded from 1888. Professional (adj.) is first recorded 1747 with sense of "pertaining to a profession;" 1884 as opposite of amateur. As a noun, it is attested from 1811. Professionalism is from 1856.

So in my view neither professional nor amateur will achieve true excellency. The ideal is to be both, skilled like a professional and with love and dedication like an amateur. When it comes to the arts, they are inseparable.

In the roman and german etymology no equivalent for today's anglo-american "job" exists. Only "professions", so it probably also is a cultural difference.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #56
Gear Guru
 
Thomas W. Bethe's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
The current meaning of the word "professional" is one who performs a service for a fee. So if you are doing a remote recording and charging for it you are a professional. Just being a professional does not mean that you are any good at it but it does mean that you are charging for your services.

As to fees. It is always market driven and if your market will not support the fees you are charging then I guess you will soon be out of business.

There is a company doing business close to here that does not charge for their recording services. They instead require the client to purchase 75 CDs at $15.00 each which comes out to $1125.00 They seem to have lots of business.

We have a grandfather who has kids in two of the non profits we do recordings for that is trying to get them to use him for FREE. It is hard to compete with FREE until you look at and hear his work and then it is no contest.

We lost one of our good clients to a recording service that underbid us by $25.00. They folded before they could make copies for the organization so we are now back doing the recording and the group does not have an archive of their one and only concert that these guys recorded.

There are a lot of people who start into the business of remote recording with the idea that they are going to make a lot of money with a minimal investment in time and equipment and some of these do quite well because the people who are hiring them don't know a Shure from a Neumann. There was one company that did a lot of recordings here is this area. They would show up with two Shure SM-57s on a high stand in the middle of the auditorium, the microphones went into a Shure microphone mixer and then into a Tascam DAT recorder. Their total investment was probably under $1,000. They charged what we charge but we bring $10,000 worth of equipment to the concert and record it so it sounds like it is professionally recorded. Who is to say which is the best way. They make money and we make money only most of our money is reinvested in the company and our equipment. They just make money and as long as no one complains they will continue to do what the do with a minimal investment in equipment. They are professionals just like us because we both get paid for what we do.

Good topic!
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #57
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videoteque's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
The ideal is to be both, skilled like a professional and with love and dedication like an amateur.
There is a very good point there. Most "pros" I met are more worried about the pay that about the results (I'm not talking only audio-recording). But of course, because someone wants to make a living in the arts field doesn't mean that s/he has to forget about making a nice living...

How can we call the profesional, perfectionist and with the dedication of the amateur?? Profesionateur????
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #58
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Plush's Avatar
 
5 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
The commentary here is real world and I think some people make some good points.

In writing my advice above I am trying to save newbies the 10 years of mis-steps after which they will already have come around to following my advice.

What I wrote is self defining. (nice car, nice house, nice vacation, health ins., gear ins., healthy eating, some periods of non stress) If you don't have the above from your recording work (AFTER THE REQUIRED 8 YEAR TRAINING PERIOD) something is wrong.

Some "markets" will not provide the opportunity to make a living in recording. If you must follow the dream, then relocate to some place that will support your dream.

The market does not set rates. That is certainly true for someone who wishes to succeed without being buffeted by clowns to the left and right who foolishly undercut them.

The market does not set rates unless you believe that each person is interchangeable with the next. There are different skill levels, different developed levels of finesse in handling clients, and different hearing and listening skills. Those with better skills and those that are recognized for having them, can charge a premium.

If you can't charge a premium (after the initial required 8 year training) then you are
having the wrong mix of clients and you are in the wrong location in the country.

I sure wish someone had suggested this stuff to me in my early days. But then again there was no internet and no GS back then.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #59
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NorseHorse's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness ➑️
I completely disagree with your statement.

I, as a recording engineer/producer set my own rates just like that!
I have never let the market determine what I'm worth...
Steve! You and Plush both operate in the highest-end market! Of course you can set your own rates and claim that the "market doesn't effect you". The fact is though, the market supports your rates. Now, there's nothing wrong with that, but don't forget there's a whole 'nother world out there where clients have much less $$ (and they aren't "penny-pinchers"). If your clients suddently had less money, you would need to adjust your rates to keep getting work, as many business have learned in the last year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe ➑️
As to fees. It is always market driven and if your market will not support the fees you are charging then I guess you will soon be out of business.
Ditto. Thomas, you've always got the weirdest folks in town trying to get your clients. This brings up a good question for the original poster, Scott Stone:

Scott, do you know what other people are charging in the area?

If so, that may give you a good idea of what you need to be at or under. When I planned my business, I did extensive market research in order to figure out what the market(s) in Virginia were like. As Thomas noted, there are a number of services that record for "free" as long as you buy CDs. These services are common in Northern Virginia, particularly on the school scene. If I say, "My recording fee is $300", no one from that market would work with me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plush ➑️
Some "markets" will not provide the opportunity to make a living in recording. If you must follow the dream, then relocate to some place that will support your dream.

The market does not set rates. That is certainly true for someone who wishes to succeed without being buffeted by clowns to the left and right who foolishly undercut them.

The market does not set rates unless you believe that each person is interchangeable with the next.
Thanks for the additional thoughts, Plush. I'm still in the first eight-years, and hopefully I'll still be going strong at the end. I totally agree about not all markets being able to support the "opportunity to make a living with recording". Most engineers from DC/VA would probably concur as well. But I wouldn't describe the market as being filled with "clowns to the left and right who foolishly undercut them". The school market I described above is mainly filled with engineers using Schoeps and Neumanns with nice or top-of-the-line pres. That should be at least some indication of how seriously they approach the craft.

Of course people aren't truly interchangable, but that's never stopped capitalist markets from interchanging individuals!

Quote:
Originally Posted by videoteque ➑️
How can we call the profesional, perfectionist and with the dedication of the amateur?? Profesionateur????
I haven't chimed in on the whole "professional" discussion. I'm not sure what you call yourself is very important, as long as the music is good.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #60
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Someone suggested in another thread that you should charge 2x's the rental rates for your gear. That seems fair to me, not that I'd know the rental rates, but I would assume that it is in the 1% to 10% range of the equipment costs.

From a business perspective you need to at least cover costs. Otherwise you're paying them to let you record them. And even at costs, you're still a slave and loosing money as equipment wears out eventually. So it really depends on what you want to get from the gig. Training, Referral, liquidate some time to cover current or past bills, or are you trying to make a living? Only you can determine that.

From a client perspective, it's important to them. They either care enough to have a recording of an event to be willing to pay for it. Or they are looking to exploit the recording to other ends. Like a demo to get paying gigs, or a legacy CD collection sold for profit / fund raising. Or other grant seeking efforts to lower member costs and then some if possible. Or more commercial interests.

From my perspective as a performer getting recorded. I got tired of buying $6K in equipment to perform with, then spending $3K in travel to a place to get recorded (big seasons end competition), plus the $100 for the deliverable from the recording entity. And after all that, still getting a poor quality product from the recording entity. So I've been selling my performance gear, taking a year or two off from traveling, and buying this recording stuff so I never have to suffer mediocrity again. It's worth that much to me, and I have difficulty trusting anyone other than myself to do it right.

What I charge for now is packaging plus shipping for those too impatient to wait till our paths cross again. If I were to charge it'd probably be based on an hourly rate. $15 an hour times 4 since there's some editing involved. With travel time being a flat rate. But I'm not looking to make a living at it yet. Otherwise it'd be much higher to cover insurances and other profession in a country expenses. I'm just an amateur looking to achieve professional results on a budget. And most of my gigs are the good old boy network. Friends, family, friends of friends.
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Rolf Ebitsch 26th December 2014
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