Quantcast
Recording Agreements - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Recording Agreements
Old 27th March 2003
  #1
Here for the gear
 
jmtayloraudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Recording Agreements

I'm just breaking in to the remote field so I have some very basic business questions. I'm doing all the audio production on a very small annual music festival, and of course I would like to expand my scope of work to include multi track or 2 track recording. How do you approach remote recording on a live gig? Do you ask permission of the band before you hit record, or do you record first and offer it up afterward? What kind of agreement do you offer? Should all this be set up with the band or band managment befor hand. How do you sell post services - mix, edit, ect...
Thanks in advance for any advice!

John Taylor
www.jmtayloraudio.com
Old 27th March 2003
  #2
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Howdy JT,

Welcome to the Remote Possibilities Forum at Gearslutz.com.

There are many ways you can approach your potential clients on a live gig. It all depends on how you want to structure it.

YES, you must ask permission before you hit record. You must talk to the producer and/or promoter of the event first. Don't even think you can do it any other way my friend. Once you pass that hurdle, go to the bands or their managers and ask them next.

You can work out an individual deal with each band or work out a package deal for the recording process, that can be split by how ever many bands you get to join the live recording venture. So, let's say it costs... $1000.00 for your gear for the day and you find 5 bands that want to do the recording, each band then pays $200.00, plus media stock, et cetera, etc.

IMO, unless you have a good relationship with the event folk and artists, never record first and offer it up afterwards. It can backfire on you big time. Sometimes, it can be a welcomed experience. If not, what will you do, erase the fine work you did after the fact? You will not be allowed to keep the work, so don't even bother.

There are many types of agreements you can offer. It can be a "Work for Hire" deal, a "Production" or "Spec" deal. You could offer it up as a "Demo" situation, meaning if they like it, they can buy it type of deal. Either way this should always be set up with the event producers, band and/or band management way before hand.

While working out the deal with all parties involved is when you should sell your post production services. You don't want to throw that at them after the fact. Be upfront and spell it out in advance. Everyone appreciates that type of business practice very much.

I hope this helped. thumbsup
Old 9th April 2003
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Steve Smith's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I wanted to bump this, as just last year a label I was doning some work for neglected to get "written" agreements in place ( they went on a verbal, and wasted about 10,000.00 USD by the time they realized they were not going to be able to release the material. Allways get it in writing!
Old 9th April 2003
  #4
Founder
 
Jules's Avatar
Cool thread!

Old 9th April 2003
  #5
Here for the gear
 
jmtayloraudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
More on recording agreements

Thanks Steve and Steve for the info. Any more specifics about written agreements? Is there any resource or example of written agreements that would be appropriate? And could someone elaborate on the various catagories that Steve R. mentioned. "Spec, "Work for Hire", "Production", "Demo". Whats the diff between spec and demo?
Thanks guys!
Old 9th April 2003
  #6
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
You're very welcomed.

This thread is part of what the "Remote Possibilities" forum is all about.

There are tons of books out there that get very specific. "This Business of Music" is a must have. A music business book search will give you a nice list of books to check out. Add additional words like "agreement", "studio", whatever's applicable, to your seach criteria.

You can pick from the contract forms in "This Business of Music" book and modify them to your exact needs.

"Spec" means speculatory. A "spec deal" is when you advance and/or get paid, if and when the band gets signed.

"Work for Hire" is when the work you performed is paid in full and owned 100% by your client. No additional compensation is promised.

"Production" is when you offer the this project as a producer, facility provider, et cetera, etc. Check out the contract agreements available in the various books out there.

"Demo" is short for demonstration. When I used it before, I meant, you can demonstrate your work and if they like it they can buy it.
When a band wants to do a "demo" they want to demonstrate their talents, hoping to advance to the next level. Demos can be spec deals, work for hire dates or paid for up front.
Old 10th April 2003
  #7
Gear Addict
 
🎧 15 years
we cant forget the development deal.
Old 10th April 2003
  #8
Lives for gear
 
wildplum's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
The mix magazine people used to offer a product called "The Business" which was a disc containing a number of sample contracts in test format which you could load into your word processor and modify to your needs. Don't know if it is still available, but as I recall, it had serval recording contracts and was very reasonably priced (unlike some currently available contracxt CDs I;ve seen).
πŸ“ Reply
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump