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State of the art concert hall acoustics
Old 16th October 2022 | Show parent
  #61
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGebauer ➡️
I also disliked the atmosphere in the hall which I found very depressing. Dark, grey and black colours dominate. A lot of concrete. It doesn't feel like a welcoming place.
You touch on another important aspect... How inviting and spirit-lifting is a building? Most of these older halls have some special atmosphere that lifts the spirits, and that too is important for a concert-hall. I am not saying that modern halls cannot do these (the Berliner Philharmonie for instance does offer both good acoustics and a welcoming atmosphere), but most modern halls are very sterile. The ridiculous current trend of dark grey and anthracite colours doesn't help either. That industrial "cool" look will be ridiculed in a few years, I guess, but restyling them in the future will cost a lot.
Old 16th October 2022 | Show parent
  #62
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kludgeaudio's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucas_G ➡️
Well, in my country The Netherlands the famous Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and the similar sounding De Vereeniging in Nijmegen stand out. Both sound wonderful and are a joy to record in (especially when not totally filled with audience). Both are also that much expensive, that (a few exceptions aside) I mainly record live concerts there.
Have you worked in the small elliptical hall at the Concertgebouw? I attended a couple concerts there and thought it was rather strange but I didn't move around enough to get much of a sense of how.
--scott
Old 16th October 2022 | Show parent
  #63
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🎧 10 years
It would appear that 100-200 years ago the criteria for success in concert hall design was more focussed and simple: the translation of the composer’s and musician’s intentions and efforts to the majority of the listening audience therein. The analysis tools available….human ears.

Today we apparently have a dizzying array of computer assisted analysis and simulation tools at our disposal….yet the net outcome seems to be spaces which deliver far less than the predictive tools promise ?

Too many cooks in the kitchen…too many experts making the wrong mistakes…too many tools analysing the wrong parameters ?

Maybe the FFT is simply fast and furious, full of white noise, signifying nothing (with apology to Shakespeare)

Seems like it’s time for a renaissance…the re-emergence of the trained ear as primary determinant !

Edit ** ...the above really only applies to unamplified music, once that caveat is transgressed a whole bunch of other factors come into play (usually 'cured' by importing a pair of line arrays...)

Last edited by studer58; 17th October 2022 at 04:59 PM..
Old 17th October 2022 | Show parent
  #64
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🎧 15 years
The primary problem that is festering under the entire question of "best acoustic design" is the degree of performance need for electric sound re-enforcement. In my part of the world, North and South America, large orchestra performance is a small fraction of the entertainment menu. Given this fact grandiose totally deflective acoustical designs in our side of the world are about as useless as tits on a boar hog. The size and skill of any performing ensemble will determine a best SR practice however in about all cases the ability to clearly hear each others input becomes a critical factor.
I have found through 5 decades of working with top level acoustic performers the absolute importance of "acoustic stage presence". If the performers can hear each other well enough when seated on stage, with out any monitor cueing, then a small wedge to support the FOH on stage bloom is about all that is needed for the ensemble to deliver to the seats exactly the show they want to provide.
The amazing truth is in some highly regarded venues the deadest spot in the building is on stage. When seats in the venue are recipients of hot reflective surfaces, less is more becomes the SR mandate. Another factor to consider is the all too often less than ideal deployment of large line arrays in concert space designed for acoustic performance. In most cases a high end point source system will work much better.
Hugh
Old 17th October 2022 | Show parent
  #65
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse;162****1
The primary problem that is festering under the entire question of "best acoustic design" is the degree of performance need for electric sound re-enforcement. In my part of the world, North and South America, large orchestra performance is a small fraction of the entertainment menu. Given this fact grandiose totally deflective acoustical designs in our side of the world are about as useless as tits on a boar hog. The size and skill of any performing ensemble will determine a best SR practice however in about all cases the ability to clearly hear each others input becomes a critical factor.
I have found through 5 decades of working with top level acoustic performers the absolute importance of "acoustic stage presence". If the performers can hear each other well enough when seated on stage, with out any monitor cueing, then a small wedge to support the FOH on stage bloom is about all that is needed for the ensemble to deliver to the seats exactly the show they want to provide.
The amazing truth is in some highly regarded venues the deadest spot in the building is on stage. When seats in the venue are recipients of hot reflective surfaces, less is more becomes the SR mandate. Another factor to consider is the all too often less than ideal deployment of large line arrays in concert space designed for acoustic performance. In most cases a high end point source system will work much better.
Hugh
...and for a change of perspective: many highly regarded (mostly older) european concert halls do indeed not measure very well (on various accounts) and no clever or expensive speaker setup/design/array or mix strategy can keep you out of troubles, except maybe this:

keep stage volume low and use only minimal 'spot amplification'...

...an approach which however often collides with the promotor's ideas or then with the musician's habits. luckily, there are occasionally some laudable exceptions (in terms of behaviour), mostly very experienced musicians.
Old 4 weeks ago | Show parent
  #66
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