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Live Album Vibe
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
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Live Album Vibe

I was fortunate to ask a guy working on a lot of live albums a question and get an answer about the VIBE part of producing live albums. It was exciting because so much is said about studio work on studio albums and while many things translate, very little is said about work on live albums.


I have personally made 6 live albums for a group - some of which I claim some beginner's luck (they sound good to me) and some I am not as proud of - regarding sonics. Still learning, I thought'd post the question here to see what you guys might have to say.

Question:

Working with the recorded tracks including audience mics, how do you create your vibe?
  • It has to include the audience mics as a primary focus
  • How do you shape them in order to be worked in?
  • What verb types might you use with the audience mics ?
  • Do you then use additional verb types for specific instruments and vocals?

Last edited by Heartfelt; 4 weeks ago at 05:34 AM..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
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The answer I received, if I understood well...
He uses a LOT of audience mics and groups them into levels of value in content. He chooses which tracks to include and works them over until they are useable (filtering/eq). Then he multi-band compresses to fix and control issues.

He finds a verb that closely matches the room ( a suitable hall) to use when THAT ambience needs to noticeably be applied to a track and also uses other verbs (plate on vocals) and delay to build space - working all together to recreate the experience.
Old 4 weeks ago | Show parent
  #3
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there's a difference between ambient/'room' mics and mics to pick up crowd noise...

for ambis, you'll want to use a wider spacings the further away from the stage (to prevent typical narrowing of the stereo image over distance).

for crow noise, use whatever does the trick; i recommend using but highly uncorrelated signals. pls note that every audience/crowd as a specific noise profile: here's a screenshot from a simple 'measurement' of the pre-show crowd noise from a recent event:
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Old 4 weeks ago | Show parent
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➑️
there's a difference between ambient/'room' mics and mics to pick up crowd noise...

for ambis, you'll want to use a wider spacings the further away from the stage (to prevent typical narrowing of the stereo image over distance).

for crow noise, use whatever does the trick; i recommend using but highly uncorrelated signals. pls note that every audience/crowd as a specific noise profile: here's a screenshot from a simple 'measurement' of the pre-show crowd noise from a recent event:

I hear you about the differences. I certainly appreciate any additional info regarding the use of mics in the rooms however, I am most interested in how you put them to use in a mix with additional verbs/delays to create the overall vibe/ambiance in a song.
Old 4 weeks ago | Show parent
  #5
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i fear i'm the wrong person to talk to as imo your premise is flawed: in my view on things, one cannot create or enhance the 'vibe' - all one can do is to affect the ratio between direct, reflected and ambient sound...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #6
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🎧 5 years
I'm of the same persuasion. I don't create the room ambiance vibe, I capture it as best I can. If ambient micing is badly compromised I'll take impulse responses of the room to add matching convolution reverb as best I can. If the room sounds like crap anyway I might use an impulse response from a better room, only so my work stands up to scrutiny compared to recordings in better rooms.

Any idiot can use a venue as a studio. The typical sound engineer recognizes that venues make shitty studios. Engineers that know how to capture room ambiance know not to treat venues as studios. The defining distinction between a venue and a studio is whether or not satisfying a live audience is its primary purpose. Capturing what distinguishes a great venue from a studio is more than half the battle, and it can only be faked so well.
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