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Recording a Tango ensemble
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 
Koschke's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Recording a Tango ensemble

Hallo everybody,

I have been mixing ITB an recording vocalist for a while now and I want to take the next step and start recording small bands. After looking at bands that I could practice with I found a nice five-member Tango ensemble that would be willing to gift me their time so I can try and rec-ord them.

The ensemble consists of 1 Bandoneon, 1 Grand Piano, 1 double bass and 2 violinists and they play in what I would call an okayish sounding room.

My question now is: How would you go about and record them?

After reading a lot and listening to Tango recordings I would stereo mic the bandoneon and the piano, use one mic for the bass and use one mic for each violin plus use one omni mic in the room. This way I could get away with using my 8 channel audio interface which I already have.

But maybe this is already overkill or way to little? What would you do and which microphones would you use? Presently, I don’t own a lot of gear but I can rent equipment for the session and then start buying little by little. Thank you for your advices and best regards

Chris
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
depends on what you're trying to achieve, what the ensemble wants, the room etc.: you might either approach things as if recording a chamber orchestra with a main mic system or then more like a jazz ensemble with close mics.

personally, i'd combine both approaches, meaning i'd add a main pair and and bump up the ambi from mono to stereo (in addition to the close mics you mentioned in your previous post).

[i've been mixing live most famous tango ensembles within the last 40 years - gear/approach has changed quite a bit...]

Last edited by deedeeyeah; 2 weeks ago at 08:28 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
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prog's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
You should look up info on "Estudios ION" and "Portugués Da Silva". I'm sure there's a lot on video too.

Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #4
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Koschke's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah ➡️
depends on what you're trying to achieve, what the ensemble wants, the room etc.: you might either approach things as if recording a chamber orchestra with a main mic system or then more like a jazz ensemble with close mics.

personally, i'd combine both approaches, meaning i'd add a main pair and and bump up the ambi from mono to stereo (in addition to the close mics you mentioned in your previous post).

[i've been mixing live most famous tango ensembles within the last 40 years - gear/approach has changed quite a bit...]
Thank you deedeyeah, I'll go for the main stereo pair and add the close mics. I initially thought of setting the musicians up in a circle with one omni in the middle, but would you suggest a semi circle with the main stereo pair in front?

And out of curiosity: How did your gear approach change over the years?
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #5
Here for the gear
 
Koschke's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by prog ➡️
You should look up info on "Estudios ION" and "Portugués Da Silva". I'm sure there's a lot on video too.

Thank you for this! Very nice input!
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #6
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koschke ➡️
Thank you deedeyeah, I'll go for the main stereo pair and add the close mics. I initially thought of setting the musicians up in a circle with one omni in the middle, but would you suggest a semi circle with the main stereo pair in front?

And out of curiosity: How did your gear approach change over the years?
not much of a fan of mono so i'd stay clear of a single omni - unless you have a spare channel; then of course use it in addition to anything else and see how it compares to other approaches.

gear (ampflification/wedges/speakers/processing), requirements for broadcasts and audience expectations have changed a lot: a much more detailed picture gets favoured while in earlier days, concerts were barely amplified and sound quality was almost entirely down to the acoustics of the concert hall (and the behaviour of the audience).

these days, i'm using sophisticated digital desks, highly capable live sound gear that gets meticulously adjusted and aligned and a broadcast processor to comply with the networks loudness specs; i'm almost exclusively using sdc's in close position (if not even being forced to use dpa clips on strings) in addition to a main pair (and sometimes and alternate pair) and two pairs of ambis; the live mix uses close mics exclusively, the broadcast mix depends a bit more on the mains/ambis and the alternate main pair gets used for recording purposes only - of course direct outputs of all mics get tracked.

in earlier days, a dynamic mic or two (on the bandoneon or whatever else could need a push) were deemed to be acceptable for the live mix and the broadcast feed was not really a 'mix' but a stereo 'recording' that got aired...
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