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Decline of the CD and the effects on location recording
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Decline of the CD and the effects on location recording

I'm wondering if there are many, or any, whose main source of work is largely through recording your own productions.

I do work in this way and also record musicians and ensemble who want CDs to sell at their concerts, but both of these endeavours are dependent on selling CDs

If your business endeavours are reliant on CD sales I'm curious to find out how you see the future of recording once the pandemic is no longer a problem, but taking into account the decline of the CD.

If you've found a way around this conundrum, I'd be really interested in your thoughts.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 
There are some niches where CDs are still popular (e.g., traditional music; even the younger fans and musicians want physical CDs, in part because they want the liner notes with all the details on the tunes and songs, even though they could download a booklet). Basically any niche that appeals mainly to an older demographic may also continue to support CD sales for a while until those folks die out. My partner and I are traditional musicians and always get asked for CDs; we do stream on more than a dozen platforms but two CD sales make us more money than a year's worth of streaming income and people always ask for CDs at our concerts. Vinyl is a consideration too; I remember reading that vinyl is now outselling CDs, but again I think it's only certain genres and only for a certain demographic.

Audiophile recordings (DSD, either downloaded or on physical media) seem to be another niche area of potential growth.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
carlheinz's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I'm not sure anyone will get around the decline of physical media against the tide of streaming. I don't know anyone listening to CD's except myself on occasion and my wife on occaision. We are older though.

I am a muti-instrumentalist.

As an experiment,

I made 20 cassettes called CMATHSOUNDS "Modular One"...just long experimental music pieces made on my modular synth. I gave 10 copies away to friends ..some who didn't own cassette decks but who I knew would talk about it or listen to it at some point and I sold the other 10 on consignment out of a local used record shop. The 10 in the shop sold out rather quicker than I expected. This was after I mentioned it on my IG account. One product...one run...one store. Small batch. This was an experiment for myself. I have my personal copy and thats it. The music was never uploaded to the web for streaming . I get asked...."hey you should upload that" , and I'm like, why ? That was my own way of dealing with the conundrum but I wasn't looking for or expecting to make a career out of it. Oddly....the side effect of this experiment got me out performing live on modular synth more often than any of my guitar gigs over the last few years.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #4
Gear Guru
 
joelpatterson's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradh ➑️
.... (DSD, either downloaded or on physical media)...
Not nothin' to add usefully on topic-- I will duplicate batches of CDs for groups that want to send swag to their donors (I mean, of course, the most very special-est donors) and the *several* odd retro-customers that that's what they know... but mostly all productions end up as wav files or mp4 files, uploaded or sent around on thumb drives, and surely thumb drives will be the next hipster darling of choice...

But if I could hijack the thread for just an instant...

DSD, now my new Sony D100 modus operandi will do that, haven't tried it yet, supposedly it's a rare, seldom seen format that no DAW will touch...

Tell me more!...
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson ➑️

DSD, now my new Sony D100 modus operandi will do that, haven't tried it yet, supposedly it's a rare, seldom seen format that no DAW will touch...

Tell me more!...
Some boutique labels sell albums in this and other audiophile formats; check out Bluecoast Records for example. And I think bwanajim on this forum has been working in this area, selling DSD recordings to audiophiles (I actually think Bluecoast is carrying the recording he worked on of the amazing Trio Palabras).

Pyramix will record in DSD, if I remember correctly. Not sure how the editing works, though.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #6
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradh ➑️
Some boutique labels sell albums in this and other audiophile formats; check out Bluecoast Records for example. And I think bwanajim on this forum has been working in this area, selling DSD recordings to audiophiles (I actually think Bluecoast is carrying the recording he worked on of the amazing Trio Palabras).

Pyramix will record in DSD, if I remember correctly. Not sure how the editing works, though.
Yes it will, if you purchase the Premium version of the cards. You edit just like you edit PCM, in a DAW that supports it.

What's not recognized (here) is the distribution opportunity of recording in DSD, even if some or most of the post production is performed in 352.8KHz PCM (DXD). Nativedsd.com has more than 28,000 subscribers world wide, 79 labels recording either in DSD or DXD, and approaching 2,000 titles it sells.

Native is always looking for additional labels to sell.

Tom
Old 1 week ago
  #7
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jnorman's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
They could sell 32gb thumb drives with mp3s of their latest album - there are tons of deals on 100-packs of small thumb drives with your logo printed on them.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #8
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman ➑️
They could sell 32gb thumb drives with mp3s of their latest album - there are tons of deals on 100-packs of small thumb drives with your logo printed on them.
ca. 6-8 years ago, something similar was indeed 'a thing' over here (albeit only for a short period of time):

at the exit doors of the venues, some bands sold (or 'gave away') thumb drives, either with the live capture (minus the encores) of the concert the audience experienced just minutes before (and the next day, the encore was ready for download) or then some 'exclusive outtakes' from recent studio activities!

of course the bands made the audience pay for that massive effort in case of the live capture: the price was 'included'/hidden in the admission/ticket price...

the latest chic seems to be streaming in parallel to the show; and as you might have guessed, some kids sitting in the audience prefer to listen on earbuds and watch the show on their cell phones, no kidding!
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Gear Addict
 
GIACOMO-_'s Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
In the field of classical music there is always one thing that can never go away: the ego.
For about ten years now, many small labels have been releasing ****ty music, played by ****ty musicians, to which they sell copies that they can sell at concerts. At least 5 euros per copy.
All these useless labels flooded the music market with ****, and then what happened to many musicians after they released their cds? NOTHING.
**** nothing.
They just spent money in vain, just feeding their own ego.
If you don't pay, you don't release records, but when you have released nothing happens. Record companies today are useless, what you need are press offices and promoters, of course you have to be a good musician. The only source of money for musicians are concerts, CDs are used only by labels to have an object to sell to musicians, not to those who listen to music.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
My wife often works at the premiere venue in our area for traditional country, bluegrass etc etc music, and the merch table is a big part of the deal for the musicians. They make CDs, and some vinyl as well as t-shirts and the revenue from those things is a lot of the profit they will get from touring. The merch table is almost always busy, people like to support artists they like even if they never listen to the CD. They like getting them signed, they like the notes and pix. Major label multi-platinum sales of CDs may be dead but this small scale business will continue in some form as long as there are live concerts. The USB stick thing flopped around here--very unsexy vs a CD or an LP, and redolent of "work", not "fun".
Old 1 week ago
  #11
The decline of the CD is going on for over twenty years. Still I am producing more CD recordings for my clients than "only downloads" and streamings. Last year after recording + 40 years, I made my debute on the "only download" market with my first recording not available on physical media. Because of the streaming and download market I began using 96k only a few years ago. I just wonder how big the DSD and DXD market is. How many consumers do have a 5.1+ 4.0 surround system with added height loudspeakers? In the late 70s I experimented with quadro but there was no market for it. A great stereo recording is so much more versatile than a just OK sounding surround one. Surround for me does not sound more realistic than stereo, the realism is in the quality of the sound, not in the imitation of a room, and the CD format still has less distortion than any microphone that is on the market. I hope to continue recording for CD a few years more. I think it is an excellent medium, even today.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
One thing that makes CDs so attractive to small-time artist-labels is that there are many services that can make any number of copies for you on demand, that look good and sound good. Also, there is the desire of many artists to have a specific collection of their music bound permanently together in the order they chose with the images and text they wanted, as opposed to having the album atomised into single songs on the web. Many sorts of music, especially those with running times longer than just a few minutes, are more likely to be listened to in full and in multiple listenings on a CD vs. a web address. Most people are not organized enough about their devices and data to have coherent collections of downloads in the same way CD or record collectors have their collections organized.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #13
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orgeltonmeister ➑️
I just wonder how big the DSD and DXD market is. How many consumers do have a 5.1+ 4.0 surround system with added height loudspeakers?
DSD/DXD and Atmos (requiring height) are of course two different products, with different customer groups. DSD/DXD are highest audio resolution products ranging from stereo, binaural, up through 5.1 surround. Atmos (7.1,9.1 and 11.1 channel are 48KHz PCM products, primarily aimed at the mega equipped home theater market. The DSD/DXD products are aimed at music lovers with the largest customer segment being interested in stereo and binaural. However, about 15% of DSD/DXD sales goes to surround interest customers, with the vast majority of those also being home theater system owners.

While the SACD, and the now extinct DVD Audio enabled and popularized 5.0 and 5.1 recordings, it's the download suppliers (DSP's) that are now providing the majority of sales channels. Annual DSD/DXD sales, including stereo and binaural, exclusive of streaming, is roughly north of 20 million dollars world wide. Throw in DSD/DXD streaming, which will become much more prevalent in the next year, and that sales number will grow dramatically.

Tom
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
It would be an interesting exercise to survey those listeners who still regularly use CD playback, and buy CD's from Amazon, concert hall foyer tables, etc: what is their main playback mechanism ?

If they drive an old vehicle its possible there is still an in-dash CD player/radio. If they retain a stereo hifi system there is perhaps a standalone component CD player. If they have a home theatre system, hooked up to the TV or LCD panel, then the DVD player will suffice. If they have an older computer then it may still have a CD burner or drive. If they have a tabletop radio, portable radio/CD player or older Bose Wave-radio then these will still have a CD slot.

If they are of the ilk who regularly buy new cars, new computers and new home entertainment systems...they'll have increasing trouble finding a disc-playing device.

It will eventually go the way of the audio cassette, but as far as currently available playback devices goes...we're still in the diminishing end of the 'transition phase' ?
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #15
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 ➑️
It would be an interesting exercise to survey those listeners who still regularly use CD playback, and buy CD's from Amazon, concert hall foyer tables, etc: what is their main playback mechanism ?

If they drive an old vehicle its possible there is still an in-dash CD player/radio. If they retain a stereo hifi system there is perhaps a standalone component CD player. If they have a home theatre system, hooked up to the TV or LCD panel, then the DVD player will suffice. If they have an older computer then it may still have a CD burner or drive. If they have a tabletop radio, portable radio/CD player or older Bose Wave-radio then these will still have a CD slot.

If they are of the ilk who regularly buy new cars, new computers and new home entertainment systems...they'll have increasing trouble finding a disc-playing device.

It will eventually go the way of the audio cassette, but as far as currently available playback devices goes...we're still in the diminishing end of the 'transition phase' ?
I have a client with a new Mac. It won't even see an external CD drive!
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff Poulton ➑️
I'm wondering if there are many, or any, whose main source of work is largely through recording your own productions.

I do work in this way and also record musicians and ensemble who want CDs to sell at their concerts, but both of these endeavours are dependent on selling CDs

If your business endeavours are reliant on CD sales I'm curious to find out how you see the future of recording once the pandemic is no longer a problem, but taking into account the decline of the CD.

If you've found a way around this conundrum, I'd be really interested in your thoughts.
i can't speak much of my activities as a musician but my 'clients' (can't stand the term when talking about musicians, artists, composers, ensemble, orchestras, bands) clear devide into two groups, regardless of genre:

lesser-known artists who depend on selling self-produced physical recording media (cd, vinyl, cassettes), t-shirts, postcards etc. at concerts and who will make almost nothing from streaming/downloads and not much more from the ticket sales

vs

internationally well-known artists who have a local cd/book store (yes, that still exists over here) bring along their entire catalog of cd's (which then will mainly get used as pricey autograph cards) and lavishly produced photo catalogues but for whom merchandising at concerts don't matter much...

...as it's way easier to make money by phone calls by pressuring an inexperienced concert promoter (who wants to put himself in the limelight with a well-known artist's name) to accept exorbitant fee demands!

[around here, this has become a serious problem which also affects accommodation, food, transport, fancy gear requests/rentals, unnecessarily long working hours for light, video and audio crew, stage hands, security etc. - mind you: i'm not necessarily talking about pop stars but artists from all genre!]


in any case: cd's, even dvd-a's are not going away anytime soon! - i'm wondering though whether there ever will be an accepted medium for multichannel immersive mixes? (i'd do anything to bypass dolby/atmos but that's another discussion i acknowledge...)
Old 1 week ago
  #17
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
I frequently asked my musician friends whether they own a CD player. Commonly they may only have a goofy little boombox in the spare room. These are classical musicians mind you.

The other main issues seem to be, permanence and listening habits. I do still buy, and listen to, CDs. For me the issue is how best to retain ownership and availability what I have purchased, I prefer a physical medium to an ethereal file posted on someone else's cloud, at someone else's whim. If I ever need to with the MP3's again, I will.

Regarding listening habit, I will find CDs that for me demonstrate artistic value, and then listen to them hundreds of times. I simply never tire of a good record, and when I buy a new one it may sit in the kitchen CD player for 3 weeks before I change it. On the other hand my friend, the same age, cannot stand to hear the same song twice. Spotify is perfect for her, not a CD! Even with all the variety she well still frown, get out of her chair and fiddle with Spotify if it plays too many of the same sort of song in a row.
Old 1 week ago
  #18
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
This thread is an interesting study of transitional strategies. IMO the most important issue to be determined is identifying the primary reason CD sales have gone in the tank. Is the demise related to sonic obsolescence, mechanical failures, or a massive shift in consumer preferences? Most likely all of the above.
As previously mentioned, Today new cars, trucks, and computers do not have cd players and both of my older model vehicles have CD players that no longer will work. In my studio I have a custom audio computer with a CD burner and a 20 year old Alesis Masterlink that is still dependable. My two children and my grand children own 5 cars and none of them have a CD player however they all have streaming services for music any time they ask for it.
Five years ago I sensed the harbinger of change coming so I acquired a pair of Lumix video cameras with Atomos recorders and began by offering A/V recordings of live shows to the bands I had previously produced CDs for. Over the past two years we gather in my studio and video two or more selections that are a live demonstration of the band's skill and entertainment capabilities. These videos are made available free to every one in quest of developing the positive recognition factor that is requisite for any act that has a chance to make it in today's concert market. For way too many reasons to elaborate on in this thread, today's concert buyer no longer trusts a produced audio recording to be an actual representation of the talent that is recorded. A video of an actual performance is much more revealing of the real performing skill of any entertainment entity.
When LPs replaced 45s we needed a dozen selections instead of two for a radio release. The profit margin with CDs was exponentially greater than with vinyl LPs and the industry got fat re loading the market with recordings lifted from former strong LP releases. Today we are returning to advancing video of a few of our best instead of yesterdays mandatory dozen cuts on a CD.
We are now, and always have been, a market driven economy that will ultimately determine the winners and losers of most all endeavors. We need to be diligently aware of the trends along with our current options and plan accordingly.
Hugh
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #19
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 ➑️
It would be an interesting exercise to survey those listeners who still regularly use CD playback, and buy CD's from Amazon, concert hall foyer tables, etc: what is their main playback mechanism?
I regularly buy CDs, but I'm not playing them. I rip them straight to FLAC using an external LG USB DVD-ROM reader (still on sale in department stores here). So my main playback devices are my phone, or my laptop connected to my $500 speakers. I'm probably not a typical CD buyer though.

Enough of my favorite songs have disappeared from Spotify / Apple / Google Play that I will buy a CD if I want the music to be in my life permanently. Having a lossless copy better than M4A / MP3 quality is important to me too. If I really love the music & it represents my personality, the CD ends up on display in the display case in my house, a conversation starter for when people come over.


Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 ➑️
It will eventually go the way of the audio cassette...
For what it's worth, I consistently see indie artists on Bandcamp selling out runs of 50 - 200 cassettes, and often the cassettes are just EPs rather than albums.

If you're wanting to get on the charts, physical media helps - the same listener can buy a digital copy to have immediately (first sale), a CD to be sent to them later (second sale), and you can upsell them to also include a vinyl or cheap cassette copy (third sale). Over on this Gearspace thread I mentioned a self-recorded indie bedroom artist who used that method to break into the UK Top 10 Album charts. The vinyl & cassettes sold out before the CDs.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #20
Lives for gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SyneRyder ➑️
I regularly buy CDs, but I'm not playing them. I rip them straight to FLAC using an external LG USB DVD-ROM reader (still on sale in department stores here). So my main playback devices are my phone, or my laptop connected to my $500 speakers. I'm probably not a typical CD buyer though.
I actually think you are a very typical CD buyer today. This is a very common scenario.
Old 1 week ago
  #21
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
LPs were the product that hopefully got someone noticed on the radio and led to sales of LPs and concert tickets. Those that did well got on TV.

CDs then took the place of LPs mostly.

Then the internet came along and jumbled things up a lot at the cost of CD sales and reduced the market power of radio and TV.

Everything is such a niche market that one probably has to study exactly what niche you happen to be in or want to be in.

One of the huge problems is that there is now 60 years worth of free concert video on the internet that competes for the buyer's attention.

CD players today seem limited to boomboxes or overpriced decks and headed to the same place as cassette players and turntables in terms of availability and pricing.

The pandemic increased streaming at home, and streaming services are well on their way to kicking DVD players to the curb, too.
Old 1 week ago
  #22
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
When LPs and cassettes were the only way of hearing recorded music, record shops thrived. LPs and cassettes wore out, and there was not a big market for second hand LPs with their clicks, pops and jumping grooves, in any case, there was a general dislike of anyone asking to borrow an LP. LPs, of course, were commonly tranferred to cassettes, to save wearing out the LP.

With the advent of the CD we had a format that had a relatively indestructable life span, given a modicum of care. No mechanical connection to the grooves to eventually wear out the discs. They were also a bootlegger's dream, because when you had the CD, you had in effect the master copy to reproduce without loss, and with scanning and digital printing, booklets were easily replicated too. I recall someone ringing me to tell me how good he thought a particular disc I'd recorded sounded, and ended by saying he'd made a copy of it for his friend!

Downloads and streaming do not begin to cut it for musicians who sell CDs at concerts, but if the number of people listening to CDs diminishes, this particular market wains, to the detriment of those performers and the people who record them. CDs find their way quite easily onto radio broadcasts, promoting the performers. In the past presenters, have told me how useful they find the sleeve notes that accompany the CD, when presenting their programmes.

The fact that CDs do not wear out, means that for a long time now, there have been many second hand CDs for sale via the internet and auction sites, often from estate clearances. These are of world class artists and sold at a price much lower than the cost of their production, and sound just as well as new CDs. The knock on effect is that sales of newer CDs are bound to be effected by this indestructable glut in the market.

From my personal standpoint, there has also been a steady decline in the popularity of the type of ensemble I have historically been recording, caused, no doubt, for a variety of reasons and not just one.

I seem to recall that at one time, a product was under development that was hifi for the home, with a hologram of the performers in miniature displayed on a table in front of the listeners. That might have been a shot in the arm and produced a demand for recordings, probably on DVD. Thinking about it, it wouldn't be five minutes before that became available via streaming too, and everything would be back to square two!

In the meantime, keep taking the tablets and don't forget to smile!!

Last edited by Geoff Poulton; 1 week ago at 02:04 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #23
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
The mechanics of CD players of nearly all types was always crap. They are or were the first thing that would break down in cheap boom boxes, desk top stereo systems and car-stereos. It's really an old scandal, since it is possible to make a CD transport that will last--the very first consumer players were pretty rugged actually. But as long there is any demand at all there will be companies that will make players. We have a very nice sounding counter-top sound system from the '90s with, yes, a now randomly-functioning CD player. I got a cheap CD player direct from China and plugged it into the aux in. Years later that's still how we play CDs in the kitchen. I also think that many people rip CDs into their devices immediately, probably while reading the liner notes. That's fine--not my pref but I'm glad they sent an artist they like a few bucks that way. And remember that merch-table sales are often 100% money to the artist--no distro, no store percentage, no shipping. This income is a vital component of how their touring economics pencil out.
Old 1 week ago
  #24
Gear Guru
I use a high end digital up sampling CD deck into a good external DAC. They never sounded so good.

The Jeep has a good Kenwood deck that also has a USB flash drive jack. CD's can be stored and played from those as well.

I prefer to hand out CD's. I use an Epson CD printer so I can print nice pics and graphics, looks pro.
Old 1 week ago
  #25
Gear Addict
 
"Hand out...", as in "give away"?
Old 1 week ago
  #26
Lives for gear
 
GeminIAm's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Interesting subject. Seems that no one has yet come up with a solution of some sorts.

As an independent local artist I try to sell CDs but find that most people at gigs or in my "circle" look at them as antiquated. LPs are popular but way too expensive to produce in such small quantities.

Nobody downloads anything anymore either, and streaming.. well.. I made about Β£20 from that last year haha.

These really are difficult times for anyone trying to earn a small living out of making music
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #27
Gear Addict
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by philper ➑️
The mechanics of CD players of nearly all types was always crap. They are or were the first thing that would break down in cheap boom boxes, desk top stereo systems and car-stereos. It's really an old scandal, since it is possible to make a CD transport that will last--the very first consumer players were pretty rugged actually. But as long there is any demand at all there will be companies that will make players. We have a very nice sounding counter-top sound system from the '90s with, yes, a now randomly-functioning CD player. I got a cheap CD player direct from China and plugged it into the aux in. Years later that's still how we play CDs in the kitchen. I also think that many people rip CDs into their devices immediately, probably while reading the liner notes. That's fine--not my pref but I'm glad they sent an artist they like a few bucks that way. And remember that merch-table sales are often 100% money to the artist--no distro, no store percentage, no shipping. This income is a vital component of how their touring economics pencil out.
I must be incredibly lucky - I've been buying CD and DVD players/recorders since CD first came out. Everything from plastic Sony Discmans to a prosumer Tascam CD recorder; I've yet to have a single disc mechanism fail. Have disc drives in four old PC and two old-ish Mac laptops; never had a failure in any of those either.
Old 1 week ago
  #28
Gear Guru
 
Thomas W. Bethe's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
We have been making CDs for clients since we started into business 26 years ago. We still make a lot of CDs for our restoration and transfer clients and also make USB sticks for certain clients. I don't think CDs are dead just not used as much. I recently saw an article that a lot of bands are now producing cassettes for their fans (who knew). Also Vinyl is getting more and more popular with certain artist but the cost for a limited run is EXPENSIVE. When I used to go to concerts pre COVID-19 I saw a lot of CDs on the MERCH table which is a good sign that they are not dead.

We still can duplicate CDs and do on CD printing and we do some limited runs for certain clients. Our last run was 10 CDs for a Christmas album by a long term client. He says he will be making a bigger order later.

Just taking it day by day.

--------
Just checked and we have used 250 CDs since the beginning of this year for clients. I am burning 20 CDs for a client this morning. FWIW

Last edited by Thomas W. Bethe; 6 days ago at 12:31 PM.. Reason: Added a thought...
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #29
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminIAm ➑️
Interesting subject. Seems that no one has yet come up with a solution of some sorts.

As an independent local artist I try to sell CDs but find that most people at gigs or in my "circle" look at them as antiquated. LPs are popular but way too expensive to produce in such small quantities.

Nobody downloads anything anymore either, and streaming.. well.. I made about Β£20 from that last year haha.

These really are difficult times for anyone trying to earn a small living out of making music
I think you've hit the nail squarely on the head.
Old 1 week ago
  #30
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
The artists I work with (and sometimes record) feel it is worth the trouble to make short runs of CDs, and haul some along when they tour. They make a living from ticket sales (slowly coming back), teaching etc, and some extra bucks from their CDs. A few have LPs too, but they are much more difficult to tour with. They do practically no shipping or mailorder, and get downloads only when they are free, and never to any great extent (and who cares at those rates anyway?). So they continue as micro record labels, since the CDs make a nice calling card, get them what radio play they get and make them a few bucks, in addition to being kind of a legacy thing for their music.
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