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Enhanced Audio shock mount and mic stands
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Enhanced Audio shock mount and mic stands

I'm curious as to whether contributors here have personal experience with the Enhanced Audio mic support (M600) and mic stands ?

The mic clamp (it's hardly a suspension, as there appear to be no compliant elements such as elastic, springs or lyres (Rycote)) holds the mic securely in 3 planes, and would therefore run counter to the idea of mic de-coupling from the stand and floor vibrations via the prevailing methods of compliant suspension and isolation.

I doubt many here would reject the wisdom of mic vibration reduction for typical location recordings...beset as they are by floorboard footfalls on suspended wooden floors.

I'm both curious and sceptical....

....of the resounding endorsements of users linked here: http://www.enhancedaudio.ie/m600-testimonials.html

.....the customer feedback: http://www.enhancedaudio.ie/m600-cc.html

....as well as the camera tripod vs handheld analogy : http://www.enhancedaudio.ie/technology.html

The company's description of the mechanics of the mount follows....

"How does the M600 work?

The Enhanced Audio M600s unique design and the fact that it is not a suspension mount, its weight and method of rigidly clamping the microphone body within six minimum points of contact contributes to:

The reduced movement of the microphone in the X,Y and Z axis,

Reduction of resonance within the microphone body itself,

Plus

The reduction of infrasonic vibrations below 20Hz which negativly dominate and mask Lo , Mid and Hi frequencies allowing the microphone to capture the soundwave clearly producing a more detailed recording.

Analogy

The best analogy to describe how the Enhanced Audio M600 works is to compare when a camera is mounted on a tripod, movement is reduced enabling the camera to record a sharper image.

With the camera held by hand, similar to when a microphone is mounted in a suspension mount movement is induced which in turn causes a distortion of the image.

It has been pointed out that the M600 when mounted on a conventional stand completely negates its design intention due to the fact that if the stand moves so will the M600 and the microphone.

Yes of course this is true but they will all move in the same direction at the same time, with the microphone held in a suspension mount the microphone is free to move in any axis causing it to buck and yaw and possibly move in an opposite direction to that of the stand, causing the microphone to loose focus when capturing the sound wave"

Sound On Sound magazine review of the M600: https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews...ced-audio-m600

Last edited by studer58; 1 week ago at 10:59 AM..
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
The explanations of the apparently mutually exclusive functions of the M600 vs all current and historic mic supports/suspensions throws out a big challenge to all of us who use them ?

Is it overstating to say that there's a binary division between the 2 philosophies and underpinning theoretical bases: that if one is right the other is necessarily wrong ?

The implication from Enhanced Audio is that conventional anti-vibrational mounts contribute to a blurry and ill-defined audio output from a mic, while their product 'tightens and focusses' the same output.

Their background info and claim:

"What's the difference between using a Suspension mount and the M600?

The Suspension

The Suspension method although reducing vibrations within the audible frequency range, providing varing degrees of attenuation between roughly 50hz and 300hz, also resonates and accentuates vibrations below 20Hz, allowing movement in the X, Y and Z axis.

A microphone when held in a suspension mount moves quite a lot in the X (Sidways), Y ( Up+Down) and Z (Back + Forth) axis, especially below 20Hz.

This is due to the flexibility built into the design of a suspension mount and that most suspension mounts have a resonant frequency below 20Hz.

This movement hinders the microphone from capturing the soundwave clearly, producing a less detailed recording.

A suspension mount due to its design accentuates infrasonic vibrations, as can be clearly seen in the Sound Analysis graphs and Polytec Laser Vibrometery report.

The M600

The M600 although reducing less vibrations within the audible frequency range restricts movement of the microphone in the X,Y and Z axis and reduces vibrations below 20Hz.

This restricted movement and reduction of infrasonic vibrations enables the microphone to capture the soundwave clearly, producing a more detailed recording.

The M600 due to its design reduces infrasonic vibrations, as can be clearly seen in the Sound Analysis graphs and Polytec Laser Vibrometery report"

You can see reproductions of the Laser Vibrometry and other reports here: http://www.enhancedaudio.ie/technology.html
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
The Revelator mic stands utilise similar design philosophy to the mic mount:
http://www.enhancedaudio.ie/the-revelator.html

"About the Revelator

The New Innovative & Revolutionary Microphone Support System from Enhanced Audio.
The Revelator in combination with the M600 Universal Microphone Mount provides an extremely stable and secure microphone support plus an unbelievable and outstanding improvement in the performance and sound of your microphone.

Features include:

Solid Aluminium Construction weighing in at 12.2 kgs.
A unique Boom Arm Angular Position Locking System which stays in the position you choose.
The M600's Minimum Contact Locking Mechanism for the adjustment of the Boom Arm Length and Centre Support Height.
A tripod base utilising inverted aluminium cones as feet for minimum floor contact and
reduced low frequency interference.

The Boom Assembly Arm

The Boom Arm assembly is constructed of solid aluminium with an overall length of 1000mm terminating in a 5/8''-27 thread to accept the M600 Universal Microphone Mount. Included is the Angular Position Locking System and a 1.25kg 2.8lb counterweight for effortless Boom Arm orientation.

How are the Boom arm and Centre Support held in position?

The Boom Arm and Centre Support slide through two clamping rings and lock in position utilising the method of Minimum Contact Mounting as used by the M600 Universal Microphone Mount creating a unique locking mechanism for the adjustment of the Boom Arm length and Centre Support height.

How does the APLS work?

The Angular Position Locking System comprises of a large pressure plate and two natural rubber disc brakes. The centrally applied pressure by the adjustment handle is evenly spread by the large pressure plate to the two natural rubber discs allowing versatile positioning and positive locking of the Boom Arm assembly"
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Just calculating that a simple adjustment to the length of the boom arm is going to require 6 individual clamp adjustments

If that's the price of perfection, how many are going to sign up for the ride ?

BTW it probably hasn't escaped some that Rycote also employ a (simplified) version of the M600's clamping system on their Universal Studio Mount: https://rycote.com/microphone-windsh...vision-studio/

.....but they also added their own lyres (to "muddy up the sound" a little). !

Last edited by studer58; 1 week ago at 11:16 AM..
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Addict
 
norfolksoundman9's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Plenty of Gearslutz/space discussion of experience of this around the time it came out (back in 2005): e.g. Enhanced Audio M600. . . yech! and Enhanced Audio M600 mic mount - Audio Samples and Mic shock mounts vs. quality hard mounts: opinions please (in the last, Hugh Robjohn's post - #26 - is useful given that the links to the Line Up tests no longer work: you can find the relevant article on line still though - https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MhI...u2rtgz93g/view). Like others, I trust Chris Woolf's tests, irrespective of his former consultancy work for Rycote.

Cheers,

Roland
Old 1 week ago
  #6
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Earcatcher's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I had a conversation with Dirk Brauner about these mounts, years ago, and he had found that they performed even better when screwed to a high mass sort of stand, especially when that type of stand would be decoupled from the floor. This only makes sense: add mass to your microphone and it will be much harder to make it vibrate. For practical reasons the result can be that you use a Rycote and add some weight to your microphone to make it more inert. This will be similarly effective as mounting it to a heavy/rigid stand.

For some of my setups I use counterbalancing weights on the shaft of the stand. Not to counterbalance the stand, but to add inertia to its own resonating with sound waves, coming from either the floor, or simply through the air from the source that you want to record. It can give a tremendous improvement of certain frequency areas.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
If the situation pertained (in real world concert settings, as well as studios) that the only 'excitation force' upon the mic diaphragm was air transmitted...then rigid coupling of the mic to stand and stand to floor would largely minimize or eliminate any movement of the mic body/diaphragm counter to the arriving audio wavefront.

Because structural building factors intervene to introduce other 'motion modes' ...principally vertical vibration from the floor upwards...the compliant mic mount was seen as the best way to achieve decoupling from this source.

The Enhanced Audio people are insisting that a mic thus suspended is therefore engaged in a constant but invisible (yet measurable) 'dance', generated either by musical air displacement or floor/stand transmission...to the detriment of accurate audio transcription (hence the camera tripod analogy).

Perhaps an alternate solution is to throw away our conventional elastic or spring or lyre mounts, substitute them with the typical small hard xlr collar mounts (which come with most mics anyway).....and then focus all our attentions upon the floor/mic stand interface...via sponges, sorbothane or other constrained layer damping method ?

Harking back to my memories of hi-end hi-fi damping methods for speakers, CD players, record turntables...I recall such solutions as sand or lead shot filling of speaker stands, hydraulic or pneumatic damping elements where the stand connected with the floor or supporting table, and pointy ended "Tiptoes" (claimed to act as 'mechanical diodes' to prevent vibration ingress.....
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Lives for gear
I have 3 mic mounts and two of their mic stands, smaller and bigger one. To be honest they look amazing but work quite bad. Stands are clunky, heavy and when they resonate, they do it for much longer than the normal mic stand. I love the looks though. Also changing the length is done by two screws, the others shouldn't be moved, as they keep the poles center. They're stupid and over engineered, that's why I like them Bought them cheap as a bundle with mounts, not worth any serious money
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Gear Maniac
 
Related only peripherally to this - I've always been a bit puzzled by old Decca session photos, where the tree mics are hard-mounted to the bars, the bars hard-mounted to the boom, the boom hard-mounted to the stand, and the stand on wheels on a wooden floor. The only isolation is the little rubber 'stumps' the M50s' spheres are mounted on.

But, in most cases the flanks can be seen hanging from suspension mounts, which I assume are some sort of elastic.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #10
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by norfolksoundman9 ➑️
Plenty of Gearslutz/space discussion of experience of this around the time it came out (back in 2005): e.g. Enhanced Audio M600. . . yech! and Enhanced Audio M600 mic mount - Audio Samples and Mic shock mounts vs. quality hard mounts: opinions please (in the last, Hugh Robjohn's post - #26 - is useful given that the links to the Line Up tests no longer work: you can find the relevant article on line still though - https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MhI...u2rtgz93g/view). Like others, I trust Chris Woolf's tests, irrespective of his former consultancy work for Rycote.

Cheers,

Roland
Many thanks for dredging these up from the GS archive Roland: it seems the various perspectives (and first hand listening experiences) were well thrashed out 10-15 years ago, and your collection of threads provides excellent preparatory reading for anyone wanting to participate here !
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #11
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avare's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by k brown ➑️
Related only peripherally to this - I've always been a bit puzzled by old Decca session photos, where the tree mics are hard-mounted to the bars, the bars hard-mounted to the boom, the boom hard-mounted to the stand, and the stand on wheels on a wooden floor. The only isolation is the little rubber 'stumps' the M50s' spheres are mounted on.

But, in most cases the flanks can be seen hanging from suspension mounts, which I assume are some sort of elastic.
Calculate the system resonance. Standard mechanical engineerong.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
At those prices , definitely 'I saw you Coming ' sales philosophy..
The BBC Agrippa stands , huge bronze edifices with hi mass worked on a similar principal
The base was 30 " wide....
They were designed for ribbon microphones.
They don't make em like that anymore.
Rycote do the lightweight approach and have some brilliant products.
Roger
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #13
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolo 46 ➑️
At those prices , definitely 'I saw you Coming ' sales philosophy..
The BBC Agrippa stands , huge bronze edifices with hi mass worked on a similar principal
The base was 30 " wide....
They were designed for ribbon microphones.
They don't make em like that anymore.
Rycote do the lightweight approach and have some brilliant products.
Roger
Could you please direct me to a photograph of one of the Agrippa stands? I found only a few mentions of them, but no photos so far.
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Still looking.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Bruce Watson's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 ➑️
I'm curious as to whether contributors here have personal experience with the Enhanced Audio mic support (M600) and mic stands?

The mic clamp (it's hardly a suspension, as there appear to be no compliant elements such as elastic, springs or lyres (Rycote)) holds the mic securely in 3 planes, and would therefore run counter to the idea of mic de-coupling from the stand and floor vibrations via the prevailing methods of compliant suspension and isolation.

I doubt many here would reject the wisdom of mic vibration reduction for typical location recordings...beset as they are by floorboard footfalls on suspended wooden floors.

I'm both curious and skeptical....
I was going to address some of the issues of solid mounts vs. isolation mounts, but found that it was done (and better than I could do it) back in 2010:

Mic shock mounts vs. quality hard mounts: opinions please

After the above referenced thread anything that I could add would just be superfluous.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #16
Gear Addict
 
norfolksoundman9's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Watson ➑️
I was going to address some of the issues of solid mounts vs. isolation mounts, but found that it was done (and better than I could do it) back in 2010:

Mic shock mounts vs. quality hard mounts: opinions please

After the above referenced thread anything that I could add would just be superfluous.
I agree Bruce, which is why I put a link to this thread in my post above (#5) and, as the links within that old thread no longer work, added new links to the Line Up tests referred to back then!

Cheers,

Roland
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #17
Lives for gear
 
Bruce Watson's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by norfolksoundman9 ➑️
I agree Bruce, which is why I put a link to this thread in my post above (#5) and, as the links within that old thread no longer work, added new links to the Line Up tests referred to back then!

Cheers,

Roland
So I'm slow and also redundant? Oy. But if the shoe fits... ;-)
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #18
Gear Addict
 
norfolksoundman9's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Watson ➑️
So I'm slow and also redundant? Oy. But if the shoe fits... ;-)
Haha! Wasn't meaning to be waspish: and the link was rather buried in a dense post by me...

Cheers,

Roland
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