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Pipe organ recording equipment and technique
Old 15th August 2020 | Show parent
  #91
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Allison ➡️
Jake Purches made a wonderful recording, which I am listening to now
Indeed. I was there for the recce and test recording/video with Jake and the organist (Jean-Paul Imbert) in 2017, although not for the recording proper.

Thinking of vaults, for those not familiar here's a close-up I took from clerestory level of the nave vault at St Etienne looking towards the organ (i.e. west): this vault - a Romanesque forerunner of Gothic sexpartite ribbed vault - is an addition of the 1120s, to a church of the 1060s/70s. Also, I've attached photos of the gallery half-vaults (primary: 1060s/70s), which add their own flavour to the acoustic, and, while we are at it, the organ reservoirs, which are neatly tucked away in the SW tower. Sorry if this is continuing to stray from the OP!

Cheers,

Roland
Attached Thumbnails
Pipe organ recording equipment and technique-_rol4305-lo-res.jpg   Pipe organ recording equipment and technique-_rol4314-lo-res.jpg   Pipe organ recording equipment and technique-_rol4321-lo-res.jpg  
Old 15th August 2020 | Show parent
  #92
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️
Thanks for your kind replies.

I go off topic, and ask if anyone can trace the type and configuration of microphones in this recording: https://youtu.be/w-6Fo6bWkJ4

It's a record I've always loved, and in my hi fi, it sounds beautifully good. It is an positive example for me, of a chamber music sound extremely good.
Apparently the recording engineer was Pietro Mosetti Casaretto who seems to have done quite a lot of work.

https://www.allmusic.com/artist/piet...o-mn0001639864

Perhaps you can get in touch with him.
Old 16th August 2020 | Show parent
  #93
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Simmosonic's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by norfolksoundman9 ➡️
Sorry if this is continuing to stray from the OP!
It’s very informative; I’m not the OP but I’m definitely appreciating it.
Old 16th August 2020 | Show parent
  #94
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simmosonic ➡️
It’s very informative; I’m not the OP but I’m definitely appreciating it.
Well thanks Greg. I had thought of starting a more architectural thread, but I think that would be too vague, so will continue to interject on such matters (with my day-job hat on) when they pop up!

Cheers,

Roland
Old 20th February 2021
  #95
Here for the gear
 
Good morning.
I resume this thread to ask for some information and your help.
I bought the microphones and audio interface for a few months already, but the latest health restrictions of the last few months have prevented me from making recordings.

In the next few weeks I will finally be able to make some recordings.
In previous posts I've had tons of great advice and thank you all for that.

I intend to start from 6 meters away from the reeds, 3.50 meters high, omni spaced from 50 cm.
With this configuration I will try from time to time to change the distances (height, length, mics spacing) to check which solution will sound better.
I will set the levels with a value of -10db with full organ.
I use Reaper for recording and post production.

But I would need your help for post production with Reaper, for the points that I will list below.

1) The organ that I will record has a fairly noisy motor fan. In addition to the bellow wind noise (which is actually tolerable), there is a low frequency noise of the motor itself.
My idea would be to "equalize" the first few "silence" seconds of the tracks, lowering only the level of the low frequencies. This would only happen in the first few seconds of silence before the music starts. I ask you if that's the right way to go, and how to do it with Reaper.
Some organ CDs have the beginning of all tracks with digital silence and an envelope of background noise until the moment the music starts. I don't like this solution, I would prefer that you start with digital silence/envelope only in the first track, and keep the background noise between the end of the track and the beginning of the next track.
So I would like to do this with the piece I will record, but I would also like to eliminate a portion of low frequencies in the background noise, but leave the noise of the wind.

2) I usually record a piece enterely, but for various needs, I may need to record a piece in different sections and then paste it.
In some organ discs I can clearly perceive the moment when a cut part has been joined to another, because when the new part is played, the reverberation of the previous part is cut off.
This effect is horrifying to my ears.

How can this problem be overcome?

I thought that maybe you can create an artificial reverb only in the tail of the piece to be joined to the next, so that the ear perceives a continuity between two pasted sections.
This however requires "crossfading" experience, etc. and i have no idea how to do it with reaper.
Can you help me?
Old 20th February 2021 | Show parent
  #96
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kludgeaudio's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️

1) The organ that I will record has a fairly noisy motor fan. In addition to the bellow wind noise (which is actually tolerable), there is a low frequency noise of the motor itself.
My idea would be to "equalize" the first few "silence" seconds of the tracks, lowering only the level of the low frequencies. This would only happen in the first few seconds of silence before the music starts. I ask you if that's the right way to go, and how to do it with Reaper.
Some organ CDs have the beginning of all tracks with digital silence and an envelope of background noise until the moment the music starts. I don't like this solution, I would prefer that you start with digital silence/envelope only in the first track, and keep the background noise between the end of the track and the beginning of the next track.
So I would like to do this with the piece I will record, but I would also like to eliminate a portion of low frequencies in the background noise, but leave the noise of the wind.
Look at the spectrum of the motor noise. It is likely a limited number of sharp peaks that can be cut out with a notch filter. Notch the motor out, leave everything else. If you have a tool that lets you see the spectrum, you can use that. Otherwise you will need good monitors with accurate low end so you can tell what is really going on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️
2) I usually record a piece enterely, but for various needs, I may need to record a piece in different sections and then paste it.
In some organ discs I can clearly perceive the moment when a cut part has been joined to another, because when the new part is played, the reverberation of the previous part is cut off.
This effect is horrifying to my ears.

How can this problem be overcome?

I thought that maybe you can create an artificial reverb only in the tail of the piece to be joined to the next, so that the ear perceives a continuity between two pasted sections.
This however requires "crossfading" experience, etc. and i have no idea how to do it with reaper.
Can you help me?
Start playing a bar or so before the point where you are going to cut, so that when you make the cut, the reverb from the tail of the last bit is present there.

Cut at the beginning of the note or in the middle of the note, never at the end of the note.

I did an article in the 2013 issue of Recording about basic editing philosophy, called "How to Edit." If you email Recording they can probably sell you a back issue.
--scott
Old 20th February 2021 | Show parent
  #97
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🎧 5 years
besides notching, i've been using frequency dependent expanders to keep unwanted noise low - i find results much nicer that 'digital silence'...
Old 21st February 2021 | Show parent
  #98
Gear Nut
Quote:
Originally Posted by kludgeaudio ➡️
If you have a tool that lets you see the spectrum, you can use that. Otherwise you will need good monitors with accurate low end so you can tell what is really going on.
I 've used this recently with positive results as an FX in reaper https://accusonus.com/products/audio...-noise-remover. It can be fully automated for just what you need to do...click FX tab in reaper input strip BUT, reaper has an excellent EQ: reaEq. again select fx tab in input strip then "add".....it will also let you see the RTA /spectrum of the room /organ noise ....use both wisely....can also be fully automated...... Click "A"in the input strip..

On the second point ....Reaper has automatic xfades and unless you cut at the wrong spot (follow kludgeaudio's instructions) you should be ok... the xfade tool is an integral part of the reaper toolbar .and you could use this https://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=122267

good luck with the project

Ray
Old 21st February 2021
  #99
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I have found the ReaFir plug in (comes with Reaper) quite useful for eliminating 'constant' background noise in a recording. I have used it successfully with amplifier hum and I am certain it would work for organ blower noise too. Of course Izotope RX handles these things very well too, but at a price. And yes, Scott's advice to start the re-take a bar earlier is spot-on.
Old 21st February 2021
  #100
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voltronic's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Reaper's included ReaEQ is very useful, but if you want to go next-level, try ReEQ:
https://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=213501

As far as the steady-state noise issue, if you encounter this frequently then iZotope RX Standard is very well worth it. Spectral Denoise is just ridiculously good at what it does. Note that this module is not included in the basic-level Elements version; you must buy Standard or Advanced.
Old 21st February 2021 | Show parent
  #101
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🎧 10 years
As jimjazzdad says, ReaFIR is an easy to use but powerful tool built into Reaper as an effect...I recommend using that to minimise the annoying aspects of the blower fan. Don't hit it with a sledgehammer...use a light touch, just to diminish, rather than eliminate

Be sure to download the free Reaper user manual from the company's website....it has good tips on using ReaFIR....and also explore the very helpful YouTube tutorial videos on this effect by 'Reaper Mania' (Kenny Gioia) and 'The Reaper Blog'. These should guide you significantly. They'll also help you with the cross fades...

I advise against pre-determining that it's only one part of the noise spectrum you're going to remove...you'll likely find that there's an interaction and overlap between 'annoyance bands'...so be open minded to take out whatever makes it sound better, using ears rather than theory alone.

Your idea of not inserting digital black silence between tracks is good...perhaps rather record a few seconds of background room tone, including blower noise, but reduce it by sufficient dBs so that you're using a 'conditioned room tone' between tracks, rather than either digital silence or full level background sound. Splice these 'diluted room tone segments' in between tracks, at appropriate duration lengths.

Re your editing dilemma and the loss of reverb tails....there's no reason why you have to do your edits during silences or ends of movements. You can just as effectively make edits during louder parts....which will substantially 'cover your tracks' as far as not exposing those reverb tails, because there'll be playing to cover it. So, when recording your repair patches, plan the segments so they span actual playing...rather than beginning and ending with natural musical rests.

When you're inserting these patches, there's a very handy 'nudge' feature, when you right click on the inserted audio fragment. You can then slide or rock it left or right by milliseconds (or fractions thereof) until it sounds perfect....
Old 2 weeks ago
  #102
Here for the gear
 
Good morning!

After a few more weeks of lockdown, I was able to (in total haste) a few recordings.
Please, do not look at the errors and the musical aspect, I had very little time available (the lockdown requires you to return home by 10 pm, and I really had the minutes counted), they are just tests to evaluate the recording technical aspect.

The recordings were made with:

1) 2 x Audio Technica AT4022: AB spaced 84 cm, height 7 meters, distance from the organ 4 meters.

2) Focusrite Clarett 4pre usb, Notebook with Reaper

3) Cordial CPM 234FM cables 10 meters.


Some considerations: I tried different heights and distances. The first stand only reached 3 meters (the pipes mouths are 7 meters): every recording I tried to make at this height always seemed too far away and poorly defined, with an excessive reverb halo.
I bought the 7.5 meter Manfrotto stand and brought the microphones up to the pipes height, and the situation seems to have improved.
After various tests carried out I found that the optimal balance between direct sound and reverb was 4 meters away from the front pipes, 7 meters high (in line with the pipes mouth) and AB 84 cm apart.
I tried with the closest AB mics, but I got some weird sensations.

With close AB mics (30/60cm)= front sound with little stereo image, reverb with good stereo image, very fuzzy bass, seems to register a lot of standing waves. The impression is that the church is much narrower and longer than reality.

With AB microphones too far away (greater than 1m) = excessive separation, little credible reverberation.

With AB 84cm microphones = it seems to me the closest feeling to what you hear in my church.

The gain has been set so that the peaks do not exceed -10db

I ask you for your advice because I have some doubts:
the sound still appears dark, there is certainly a loss of high frequencies that the microphones have not been able to capture. It's normal? Or is it a feature of inexpensive microphones? Should I expect the same thing on (for example) the DPA 4006? (which anyway I can not afford...). If I bring the microphones closer to the pipes, the high frequencies are better captured, but I lose some of the reverb and the sounds become too "ping-pong" in the pipes.

In your opinion, can an audio recording with this equipment meet the minimum quality requirement to be able to record a commercial CD?
That is: could a mastering engineer agree to work on audio tracks recorded like this, in order to produce a real master?
In many commercial CDs I hear a more "refined" sound especially at high frequencies, even when the microphones seem farther away (like for symphonic organs).
If you listen to the "ance" clip you will hear a bit of high frequency "dirt" (reed pipes have a lot of harmonics), but in commercial recordings all this "dirt" looks beautifully euphonic .. it's something the mastering engineer can correct or does it depend exclusively on the microphones and preamps of the highest quality?

Thanks

P.S. files attached are flac, I had to rename them to .fla because I couldn't upload with .flac, maybe you need to rename them correctly to listen.
Attached Files
File Type: fla ripieno.fla (8.69 MB, 21 views) File Type: fla ripienotromba.fla (8.56 MB, 8 views) File Type: fla riptrombaped.fla (4.04 MB, 3 views) File Type: fla ance.fla (10.96 MB, 7 views) File Type: fla voceumana.fla (11.99 MB, 2 views) File Type: fla violacelflauto.fla (10.88 MB, 6 views)
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #103
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kludgeaudio's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️
the sound still appears dark, there is certainly a loss of high frequencies that the microphones have not been able to capture. It's normal? Or is it a feature of inexpensive microphones? Should I expect the same thing on (for example) the DPA 4006? (which anyway I can not afford...). If I bring the microphones closer to the pipes, the high frequencies are better captured, but I lose some of the reverb and the sounds become too "ping-pong" in the pipes.
Try toeing the microphones in and out and see how the top end changes. Also try adjusting the height.
Even the best omnis will be more sensitive to high frequencies straight on the center axis. Some omnis will be much more so.

In a pinch, try EQ. I avoid EQ whenever possible, but sometimes you cannot.
--scott
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #104
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
For motor noise you can use ReaFir in Reaper, I used it a lot last year when I was recording lot of church services for my church.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #105
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🎧 10 years
I find these tests sounded very well, you have good bass and good balance and it has lot of ambiance but still clear. I think you would get little more high frequency by getting little closer, maybe have the stand 3-3.5m from the organ.
Another idea which I have used sometimes is to have the omnis without change but add pair of Cardioid microphones in the center (X) and maybe closer to the organ and then add them in post, often just a small hint of them is enough to bring high frequency back in.

Of course EQ often does work also but I tend to avoid that as much as possible.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #106
Here for the gear
 
Good morning, and happy Easter!
Thanks for the replies.
I tried to experiment with various distances, starting from 7 meters in length up to approaching about 2 meters.
I can say that approaching the microphones even at 3 meters from organ there is no substantial improvement in the high frequencies, but the "ping pong" effect becomes too evident.
I have tried to angle the mics, both internally and externally, and I don't have a substantial improvement in the high frequencies.
Angling the microphones I noticed instead a change in the standing waves (unfortunately my church is full of them): when they are slightly angled, it seems to me that the low frequencies are much cleaner.

I would also be tempted to try adding two cardiodes, but unfortunately I can't afford them right now...
Old 2 weeks ago
  #107
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rwhitney's Avatar
For Jung-A Lee's CD/DVD "Beauty in the Wind"(2009), we recorded five Orange County, CA church pipe organs (all in one very long day!) using two spaced pairs of LDCs about 20ft up. I had no prior experience with those churches, and had no time for sound checks, so I just eyeballed the distances, divided the space into thirds and placed the close pair around the middle of the first third and the distant pair around the middle of the last third. We adjusted a little during the first take if necessary. The circumstances of this recording were insane, but some of it came out pretty well, considering, we thought. Here's a clip on YouTube from that recording: https://youtu.be/N0jVmBGyikI

My original post regarding microphone choice was incorrect, so I'm quoting my notes from that day for accuracy's sake:

"I recently recorded five pipe organs, for the first time, for an independent video documentary, and would like to discuss and share my experiences.

In all cases, we set up a main pair of U87s in cardioid pattern either in ORTF, or spaced up to about 20", depending on the layout of the main pipes, up around 20' and about 20'-25' feet back. The U87s in omni did not sound detailed enough to us, or would have needed to be placed too close to a particular range of pipes for the desired presence, so we miked "close" and relied on a pair of TLM170s usu. in omni for ambience. These were also up 20' from the floor, and another 20'-40' back from the main pair. In one church, we were fortunate to have a rear balcony for the ambient pair on regular mic stands.

Three of the churches had pipe divisions in the rear of the church, usually behind a balcony. In one case, we used an XY configuration of AKG 451s about 15' away, in another we used an ORTF pair of AKG C414s suspended from a catwalk, and in one we used a single C414 facing away from a pair of speakers that formed the electronic portion of a hybrid organ.

The mics went to an Apogee AD16x>Digi003>PT LE set up in the sanctuary for communication with the director. I would have preferred to set up in a separate room, such as a dressing room, bride's room, etc. to have some isolation from the direct sound of the organ, but using headphones to listen back between takes did work.

The extended bases of the large stands we rented would not allow the mics to be placed close enough for a true ORTF (7.5"). As a result, some comb filtering occurs when this pair is summed to mono. I felt U87s were too weighty to place on a stereo bar at 20' up, so we exercised caution by using a separate stand for each. I can now see the clear advantage of using SDCs for this application, but we didn't have any of high enough quality on hand. Fortunately, some of the phase issue has been corrected by shifting tracks.

I found tall, heavy duty stands to be absolutely necessary for the main pair in 4 out of 5 of the churches. We rented three Mathews 20' high roller light stands, sandbags, and Norman adapters with 3/8" threaded studs from Samy's Camera in Costa Mesa, CA, and used 3/8"-to-5/8" adapters for the mic mounts. These were just tall enough for the churches I recorded in. Getting the mics up high seems to yield a expansiveness and depth to the sound that mics closer to the floor would not. Especially in carpeted churches, of which I think there was only one.

The problem of ambient noise, from organ blowers, external traffic, lawn mowers, airplanes, and creaky crackly church edifices was formidable. The organs themselves were mechanically noisy, too, which I'm told is typical. I did not know how to avoid the abundance of blower noise, other than to sacrifice detail by placing the main mics further away. In the end, I used the Izotope RX Noise plugin to reduce the unwanted commotion. This plugin worked reasonably well, though there is some low level aliasing and blur in the final product.

Because this was in many ways primarily a video shoot, we only had time for two or three takes of each piece and, due largely to the various noises, have had to splice extensively between them to achieve an acceptable result."

My general rule with classical music was a close pair in cardioid and a distant pair, usually in omni, balanced in the mix for definition/ambience; but with time and experience in a given space, a single pair of either will usually work fine and produce an arguably more natural result. The microphones used are far less important than placement and performance, of course.

Last edited by rwhitney; 2 weeks ago at 05:57 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago
  #108
Here for the gear
 
Thanks.

In your opinion, the technical quality of the recording like the clips I posted, can meet the minimum requirements for the production of a commercial CD?
(I am referring only to the technical aspect of recording, the clips are just audio tests).
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #109
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rwhitney's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️
Thanks.

In your opinion, the technical quality of the recording like the clips I posted, can meet the minimum requirements for the production of a commercial CD?
(I am referring only to the technical aspect of recording, the clips are just audio tests).
I'm not an organ aficionado, but I'd say you're in the ballpark and with a bit of tweaking on placement, the quality is there. Too much free-field ambience for my taste, but organ recordings I studied to prepare for the recording I did were all over the place in terms of clarity and reverberation.

I'd say the equipment you have is good enough to produce a commercial recording. You may want to use some EQ in the final product. We had ours professionally mastered, which is a step you might also consider before public release.

Last edited by rwhitney; 2 weeks ago at 03:19 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #110
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️
Thanks.

In your opinion, the technical quality of the recording like the clips I posted, can meet the minimum requirements for the production of a commercial CD?
(I am referring only to the technical aspect of recording, the clips are just audio tests).
I'm also organist so I think I know a little bit about the subject of what to expect to hear on CD.
Note however that of course I haven't listened to your instrument in question in person but it sounds like it's great and powerful organ worth exploring.

Anyway, from the examples I think the position you had the microphones in your test recordings is perfectly acceptable in terms of quality and what you expect to hear on organ recordings. You got the feeling of powerful pedal stops and also brilliance of the pleno even though it's maybe on the darker side like you mention but only you know if that's realistic presentation of your organ or not.
Reeds stop sample (Anche.flac) sounded very good and clear, it had the ambience but did not turn into mush. :D
The string stops with the flutes in pedal sounded very good and I don't think you can do better with that honestly.

One of the things I noticed after I started recording myself is that the organ often sounds completely different in the space than by the console so if you haven't already ask someone to play for you on this organ and walk around the space to see if your examples capture your organ truthfully or not. If you find out that it's too dark than I would try to use EQ to add some HF because I think your microphone position is probably as good as it gets.

Good luck and looking forward to hearing some longer pieces performed.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #111
Here for the gear
 
Thank you very much for your answers!
I have tried using Reafir and I find it a very interesting tool. I tried to equalize the tracks, and I saw that by creating a higher point of about 2db on the frequency of 6000 hz (about, a curve is created), the organ sounds more like it is in reality. Now I will do more experiments with EQ, to understand how I have to move.

I tried the subtract mode to eliminate engine noise, and I find it fantastic!

But I have a question: I may need to apply noise reduction only on part of the track, and not on the whole track.
Is it possible to run a plugin on only a selected part of the track?
I didn't succeed...
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #112
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
You should be able to animate the FX off and on in Reaper. Select the "trim' button on the master track and select the effect (ReaFIR in this case) that you want to turn on and off. Now you 'draw' the points where you want FX on/off under the track. Hard to explain in text, but there's lots of support on Reaper forums and YouTubes
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #113
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjazzdad ➡️
You should be able to animate the FX off and on in Reaper.
Animate...or Automate ?

Or...https://youtu.be/mxD-5z_xHBU
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #114
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 ➡️
Animate...or Automate ?

Or...https://youtu.be/mxD-5z_xHBU
Automate I guess, but animate would be better because then it would come to life and do it for itself...
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #115
Gear Guru
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwhitney ➡️
For Jung-A Lee's CD/DVD "Beauty in the Wind"(2009), we recorded five Los Angeles church pipe organs (all in one very long day!) using two spaced pairs of LDCs about 20ft up.
Which churches were these? My favorites are the 3 organs in the First Congressional Church on 3rd. That has 3 organs tried together, the sets of pipes in different locations throughout. It's a 3D experience as the sounds/pipe surround you.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #116
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rwhitney's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams ➡️
Which churches were these? My favorites are the 3 organs in the First Congressional Church on 3rd. That has 3 organs tried together, the sets of pipes in different locations throughout. It's a 3D experience as the sounds/pipe surround you.
I'm going to change that to "Orange County" churches. My memory is failing me, but apparently we recorded at: St. Andrews Presbyterian Church - Newport Beach, CA | Geneva Presbyterian Church, Laguna Woods, CA | First Evangelical Free Church - Fullerton, CA | First Baptist Church - Santa Ana, CA | St. John's Lutheran Church - Orange, CA. The DVD also lists Walt Disney Hall, which they must have added later because I didn't record that one.

I've never been in First Congregational on 3rd.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #117
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kludgeaudio's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organist ➡️
Thanks.

In your opinion, the technical quality of the recording like the clips I posted, can meet the minimum requirements for the production of a commercial CD?
(I am referring only to the technical aspect of recording, the clips are just audio tests).
You can put damn near anything on a CD and people will buy it and most people will be perfectly happy with it. The question is whether you are happy with it and who your audience is. I mean, people buy Yoko Ono records.
--scott
Old 1 week ago
  #118
Here for the gear
 
I am hardly satisfied with my performances unfortunately, but I intend to produce this cd because the organ has been totally re-voiced to my specifications and I would like to leave an "official" sound document. I don't do it for my vanity.

I tried to use the eq, and I must say that with a simple touch around 6,5khz (2db up) I was able to get a fairly realistic reproduction of what you hear in my church. I have no idea if raising 2db is a heavy or light use of eq, but I have to say that now the recordings are much closer to how the organ actually sounds.
I also tried to raise it by 2.5 db, but it seems to me that it becomes excessively bright and strays from reality. I also tried to create a hump around 10khz, but my ears prefer a hump around 6.5khz.



I have created a single file where you can hear the changes.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/i3164ini3g...20eq.flac?dl=0


What I hear in commercial recordings is a very charming and euphonic (I would say "audiophile") "silky" effect that is still missing from my recordings (which, however, seem more realistic, for better or for worse, than what happens in my church).
I then saw that some Neve preamps have a potentiometer called "silk" ... is this the effect I'm looking for? I'd be curious to hear some recordings made with and without this feature.

I would be happy to hear your opinion and advice on the eq...

Thanks very much.
Attached Thumbnails
Pipe organ recording equipment and technique-20210409_114119.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #119
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
A good mastering engineer can probably get what you seek in this recording. High quality EQ, accurate monitoring and an experienced pair of fresh ears may be worth the investment. I can't personally recommend anyone with organ credentials, but hopefully someone here on the forum can...
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #120
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I'm not experienced in using EQ because I tend to avoid it. But I think the soft examples sound great and maybe the pleno needs a little bit more EQ at higher frequencies if you find it lacking compared to "real" sound of the organ.

I will let more experienced people guide you more about the EQ and mixing stuff. But I think the microphone position is great.
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