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Reverb: Tips and Techniques
Old 2nd May 2010 | Show parent
  #91
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by lpuma ➡️
I like to use reverbs to create swooshes for transition fx between 2 tracks, let's say for a teaser where you want to shocase several musical peices or whatever.

Let's say you have two beats and want to create a nice swoosh as a transition fx.

first drop a flanger on an aux flowed by a reverb with some kind of huge sounding preset with a big predelay and tail also add a phaser at the end of the chain.

now automate the aux at the end the first beat track in order to create you transition swoosh, you can also fine tune with track volume automation for a smooth transition and tweak the flanger/verb/phaser parameters. now drop the 2nd beat at the end of the swoosh.
Play around with some reversed reverbs, or negative predelay, or negative predelay on a reversed reverb effected by a flanger. \m/
Old 1st October 2010 | Show parent
  #92
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Johnny Paez's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
very nice reverb thread
thumbsup
Old 1st October 2010 | Show parent
  #93
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Paez ➡️
very nice reverb thread
thumbsup
Thanks.
Old 26th November 2010 | Show parent
  #94
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🎧 10 years
Just wanted to say massive props to you storyville, learned a lot from this thread, particularly the first post, hadn’t considered the math behind reverb length at all until now.
Old 13th December 2010 | Show parent
  #95
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thanks storyville for sharing your precious tricks!

i have problems creating the depth in my mixes, here's how i do it:
i normally use 2 reverbs, one for a near impression (vocals, lead instruments) and one for farer away impression. i set the pre-delay the other way around, because i read that somewhere: for the front room eg 60 ms, for the back room 30 ms. that's why i believed the nearer the sound the more clearer it should be and with a pre-delay of 60 ms the instrument is more de-tached from the reverb. an instrument with eg 0 ms pre-delay has the reverb totally attached, therefore sounding farer away. i see, you do it the other way around.
than i EQ my reverbs: the front reverb has maybe a lo-cut 300Hz (to cut out all the muddiness), hi-cut 10kHz (or less, like 5kHz to cut out the sibilance on vocals). the back room has lo-cut 500Hz, hi-cut 5kHz.
but i am never satisfied with the depth of my reverbs. i tried mono reverbs which sounded a bit better, but not good enough. maybe it's my plug-in, i only have the Logic Express reverbs plus the ArtsAcoustic one (but not the full version). now i am mostly using a free convolution reverb programm with mono IR's: one panned left, one panned centre/front with pre-delay ca. 60ms), one panned right and one panned centre/back (with pre-delay ca. 30ms).
i do record most instruments with mics in a small room, paying attention not to mic to close, eg guitar amps are always miked with a distance of 8-10 cm.
i dunno, i always end up with not much depth in my mixes and when i use more reverb it sounds washy ... maybe i should use shorter reverb times, i usually use around 1 sec.

how many reverbs do you use normally for your mixes? and how do you get the drums to sit behind the main vocal? drums need transients, so cutting down on them to make the drums sit behind the vocals doesn't seem like the best thing to do for me. do you use plates for the snare? a room for the overheads or the whole drumset?
and i pay attention not to use to much reverb, because i like it rather dry. so i mainly solo the instruments, turn up the sends until i hear a bit of reverb and that's it.

thanks a lot for helping.
Old 13th December 2010 | Show parent
  #96
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinicalmicmusic ➡️
i love doing the "clap test"
Does that involve a doctor? ;P
Old 16th December 2010 | Show parent
  #97
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinzin ➡️
thanks storyville for sharing your precious tricks!

i have problems creating the depth in my mixes, here's how i do it:
i normally use 2 reverbs, one for a near impression (vocals, lead instruments) and one for farer away impression. i set the pre-delay the other way around, because i read that somewhere: for the front room eg 60 ms, for the back room 30 ms. that's why i believed the nearer the sound the more clearer it should be and with a pre-delay of 60 ms the instrument is more de-tached from the reverb. an instrument with eg 0 ms pre-delay has the reverb totally attached, therefore sounding farer away. i see, you do it the other way around.
I think something was lost in translation. Longer pre-delay implies the sound is closer to the listener. I believe we both follow the same idea. This is true in natural space, as farther sound reaches your ears closer to the same time as the reflected sound.

than i EQ my reverbs: the front reverb has maybe a lo-cut 300Hz (to cut out all the muddiness), hi-cut 10kHz (or less, like 5kHz to cut out the sibilance on vocals). the back room has lo-cut 500Hz, hi-cut 5kHz.
but i am never satisfied with the depth of my reverbs. i tried mono reverbs which sounded a bit better, but not good enough. maybe it's my plug-in, i only have the Logic Express reverbs plus the ArtsAcoustic one (but not the full version). now i am mostly using a free convolution reverb programm with mono IR's: one panned left, one panned centre/front with pre-delay ca. 60ms), one panned right and one panned centre/back (with pre-delay ca. 30ms).
i do record most instruments with mics in a small room, paying attention not to mic to close, eg guitar amps are always miked with a distance of 8-10 cm.
i dunno, i always end up with not much depth in my mixes and when i use more reverb it sounds washy ... maybe i should use shorter reverb times, i usually use around 1 sec.

Depth starts at the source sound. My goal when I mix dry is to create as much sense of space as possible without ANY reverb at all. Then when I add reverb, I only need a very little bit to really bring the mix to life. I would say, if you are eqing your reverbs as a general practice, your choice of reverb may need assessment, or more likely, there is build up in those frequencies in the source sounds that should be eq'd out before applying reverb.

how many reverbs do you use normally for your mixes?
the least I use is 0, but most often the least I use is 1. Even when I am relying primarily on room captures, I often augment the snare with a plate, or tuck a lite amount of a longer room reverb very subtley in the background. The most I've used in a single mix is 14. That was a fun mix. Average, I'm using two and maybe a delay somewhere. I don't often use more than one reverb on one source.

and how do you get the drums to sit behind the main vocal? drums need transients, so cutting down on them to make the drums sit behind the vocals doesn't seem like the best thing to do for me. do you use plates for the snare?
Mix the vocal and the snare source sounds together. The relationship between the vocal and snare is vital, because the presence of both are right in the same range - and the aesthetic desire to hear both is pretty close in many genres. Drums DO need transients to have life, but careful compression can SHAPE the transient so it doesn't cut in front of the vocal, but still has plenty of life and punch. I TOTALLY use plates on snares. Tons of engineers do it that way, and I think there's a reason. I like to set the diffusion as low as I can before I start hearing weird "chompy" noises. This way I get a nice rugged sound that doesn't actually overstep the snare or clutter the mix.

a room for the overheads or the whole drumset?
Definitely. When I mix rock, I usually have a room capture set up, so I rely on that. But if there is no room capture, I usually spit the OHs into the room. But there's no rules against throwing the whole kit (and kaboodle) into a reverb. Just watch the low end build up.

and i pay attention not to use to much reverb, because i like it rather dry. so i mainly solo the instruments, turn up the sends until i hear a bit of reverb and that's it.

That's generally how I do it as well. Greg Scott got me into the habit of soloing all the reverbs and room sounds and mixing those to sound cohesive as well. It makes the whole mix sound "gelled".

thanks a lot for helping.
No problem, I hope my advice leads you to better mixes!
Old 16th December 2010 | Show parent
  #98
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by inaudible ➡️
Just wanted to say massive props to you storyville, learned a lot from this thread, particularly the first post, hadn’t considered the math behind reverb length at all until now.
You're welcome!

Not just the idea of math - that's sort of the core of the structure - but thinking of reverb in the same terms you think of a source sound: rhythm, tone, texture.

Anyway, I'm glad people are benefiting from this thread. I think I will post up one on compression in a similar vain.

It's interesting because the thread is from a long time ago, and much of my process has changed. I hope everyone bares in mind that the most important thing is to always do what works for them. This thread is intended to provoke thought and for others to come around and say:

"Story, this is a cool thread - but I do it like this, and it's totally different, but also works really well."
Old 17th December 2010 | Show parent
  #99
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zinzin's Avatar
thank you very very much! a thread about compression would be very very welcome!
Old 17th December 2010 | Show parent
  #100
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinzin ➡️
thank you very very much! a thread about compression would be very very welcome!
Isn't that a coincidence:

https://gearspace.com/board/rap-hip-...mpression.html
Old 18th December 2010 | Show parent
  #101
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🎧 10 years
found this thread today.really awesome.
i have to ask again about panning revers.
i need to have an example.
on mixing drums.
i normally use 2 reverbs for drums.
reverb1 is a small room for the whole drumkit.
reverb 2 is a bigger room for snare.
so i send the snare track to reverb 1 and also to reverb2.
both reverbs are stereo.

now my question,...if you use a stereo reverb for drums, how do you make the stereo panning?`in cubase you can use 0-100 from the center to right and left.100 is hard side and 0 is center position.
how would you pan the drum room?
i normally panned it like 75 - 0 - 75.
reverb 2 is also stereo and normally i pan it like 60 - 0 - 60.
i have to say, that absolutely doesn´t work.

i also would like to know, when do you use stereo and when mono reverbs?

thanks a lot.
Old 18th December 2010 | Show parent
  #102
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by tape_attack!!! ➡️
found this thread today.really awesome.
i have to ask again about panning revers.
i need to have an example.
on mixing drums.
i normally use 2 reverbs for drums.
reverb1 is a small room for the whole drumkit.
reverb 2 is a bigger room for snare.
so i send the snare track to reverb 1 and also to reverb2.
both reverbs are stereo.

now my question,...if you use a stereo reverb for drums, how do you make the stereo panning?`in cubase you can use 0-100 from the center to right and left.100 is hard side and 0 is center position.
how would you pan the drum room?
i normally panned it like 75 - 0 - 75.
reverb 2 is also stereo and normally i pan it like 60 - 0 - 60.
i have to say, that absolutely doesn´t work.

i also would like to know, when do you use stereo and when mono reverbs?

thanks a lot.
Panning the room captures on drums is a personal preference. I'm usually hard left and right, or I've done a mono capture down the center. I may take the OHs in slightly (<75, 75>). That's if I don't want the tom drums and cymbals flying all over the stereo field.

With artificial reverbs, again, I'm generally hard left and right, or a mono down the center.

If the reverbs are panned further in than the dry sound, it will generally elongate your front to back depth, and make your kit seem very forward. There's nothing wrong with that at all, it's a choice. Mono reverbs are good for maximizing that front to back depth.

When I'm using reverb on just the snare, I usually prefer it the opposite way - a tight little thing just enhancing the overall body of the snare, and a bigger space on the kit.

Again it's preference. The effect of what you are doing is going to be a tight drum sound with a big bellowing snare. It will separate the sound of the snare from the rest of the kit. This can be good or bad, depending on what you want to hear.
Old 19th December 2010 | Show parent
  #103
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miro's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by b0ssa ➡️
Does that involve a doctor? ;P
hahaha! this made me laugh!! thumbsup
Old 19th December 2010 | Show parent
  #104
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atma's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinzin ➡️
i have problems creating the depth in my mixes
If you can find it, there used to be a free plugin called isone that i highly recommend, which used to be available from jeroenbreebaart.com. it uses HRTF processing (which you can turn off if you like) and an extraordinarily realistic room acoustics emulator—since i use a lot of vst synthesizers which have an inherent spacial flatness to them, i've found this plugin indispensable for giving the illusion that things are coming from somewhere "outside the speakers". I think in conjunction with a good convolution verb, you may find it useful. it's definitely one of my secret weapons, so to speak.
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #106
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by atma ➡️
If you can find it, there used to be a free plugin called isone that i highly recommend, which used to be available from jeroenbreebaart.com. it uses HRTF processing (which you can turn off if you like) and an extraordinarily realistic room acoustics emulator—since i use a lot of vst synthesizers which have an inherent spacial flatness to them, i've found this plugin indispensable for giving the illusion that things are coming from somewhere "outside the speakers". I think in conjunction with a good convolution verb, you may find it useful. it's definitely one of my secret weapons, so to speak.
I like that isone plug - thanks for the tip!

So, I mentioned a few posts back that the most spatial processing I've used in a mix was 14. I believe I was mistaken - I think it was only 13.

But it's on my demo reel now:

Weiss Sound » Portfolio Archive

The artist is "Via Motive" and the song is titled "Iran."

It's a unique listen in the sense that it is mixed in a more cinematic way than a tradition mix. There's a lot of "scene changes" and focus on ambiance.
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #107
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Hey Storyville, really awesome thread. Kudos on the knowledge drop. I havent read every word of this thread but i've scanned it. One thing that either i missed, or seems to be overlooked is......

1. When you hear a reverb, how can you tell what type of verb it is? Plate? Hall? Room? Chamber? Spring? Gated? Reverse? What are some of the giveaways that tell the ear which verb the mixer used?

2. what are some of the signature characteristics of each type of verb?

3. When choosing which verb to use, where do you begin in trying to decide what type of verb to use. Why might you want to use a short room over a long hall, or maybe more appropriately, why a long plate instead of a long hall? Why a small chamber over a medium room? etc...

great thread!!!
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #108
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis ➡️
3. When choosing which verb to use, where do you begin in trying to decide what type of verb to use. Why might you want to use a short room over a long hall, or maybe more appropriately, why a long plate instead of a long hall? Why a small chamber over a medium room? etc...
I'm interested to see what people have to say about this.

I don't think too much..
I just pick a reverb based on my experience. I'll pretty much know what I'm looking for from the start. If the verb I picked doesn't work, I'll try another one. I know which is the right one when I hear it.

To me:
Plate = Smooth, clean, it has a "sheen" to it
Hall = Big room, auditorium type sound
Room = More damp, varies from dark to bright
Ambience = Very small room, sometimes unrealistic dimensions
Chamber = Complex diffusion, resonance, like a church or something
Spring = Old school sounding, "grainy"
Gated = Sounds gated.. I rarely use gates on reverb..
Reverse = Rarely use this either..
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #109
KT1
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ISayItLikeItIs ➡️
Reverse = Rarely use this either..
I have never heard of a reverse reverb. That being said I have applied reverb on some audio and then reversed the audio to create the effect i was looking for. Is this what we are talking about?
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #110
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🎧 10 years
Hey Ken, thanks for the props. My answers are in bold. Of course, I'd like to hear your thoughts on choosing different reverbs for different purposes as well!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis ➡️
Hey Storyville, really awesome thread. Kudos on the knowledge drop. I havent read every word of this thread but i've scanned it. One thing that either i missed, or seems to be overlooked is......

1. When you hear a reverb, how can you tell what type of verb it is? Plate? Hall? Room? Chamber? Spring? Gated? Reverse? What are some of the giveaways that tell the ear which verb the mixer used?

It can be tough - as reverbs can often be labeled "Hall" and sound interchangeable with "Room." These two are the toughest to tell apart. Easiest ones to catch to my ear are Reversed - because you hear the incline - and Gated - because the tail disappears prematurely. Gated can be tough to catch because often, with a non-linear decay and a full mix, it's hard to hear if the tail is gone, or just getting masked. It's a guess - but if the reverb seems to be strongly present - yet still seems to not conflict with the dry sound, there's a good chance there's some kind of gating effect. Springs are usually pretty easy to pick out - they have a "ridged" effect and don't have possess any early or late reflections. They just shoot off one linear decay - and don't possess any pre-delay unless it's an algorithm or a pre-delay is artificially created on the return buss.

Springs you can usually discern some of the individual "ripples" especially if the spring itself is tuned with a low tension - higher tension springs will have a mild ring.


Plates also don't naturally possess pre-delay or seperate generation for early and late reflections. It's also one single linear decay. Plates tend to be smooth - but will often have certain frequency areas where there seems to be more "build up" - areas of density that can make a plate sound thick - which to me is the main sonic cue that it's a plate rather than a natural space.

The difficulty here is that different springs and plates are constructed differently - so it's hard to say that plates are "smooth" - as some plates can get a little crunchy, and it's hard to say that springs are "rigged" - as some are pretty durn smooth sounding.

Rooms and Halls - it can really be a crapshoot. MOST of the time, Hall algorithms are designed to mimic actual bowed concert spaces - the sound is characterized by "oppenness" and an even transition between early and late reflections. Rooms on the other hand theoretically should be a more natural space with more peaks and dips in the frequency response, and a greater separation between early and late reflections (to mimic flat, parallel surfaces). But a room and a hall can really sound like anything depending on what it was modelled off of and what the processor's designer intended. Chambers are again, tough to differentiate - because a chamber is essentially just a room that's been designed with the purpose of capturing reflections.

A REAL room, vs. a REAL hall, vs. a REAL chamber is usually much easier to tell than with algorithms - because the affects of size and shape are not so customizable.

Some algorithms have diffusion settings for their plate algorithms. Makes it hard to tell if it's a weird plate, or totally weird ass room.

2. what are some of the signature characteristics of each type of verb?

Basically what I said about 1.

3. When choosing which verb to use, where do you begin in trying to decide what type of verb to use. Why might you want to use a short room over a long hall, or maybe more appropriately, why a long plate instead of a long hall? Why a small chamber over a medium room? etc...

Environment, tone, texture, and rhythm are really the key for me. It's not much different than choosing what string pad you want when there are ten different options off of your synthesizer. My first question is if I am looking for a sense of real space, or musical space. If I'm doing post production, or something cinematic like the example I linked to above - then I'm thinking in terms of "where do I imagine the spaces to be and what sonic image do I want." This leads me to think more in terms of spatial cues than musical ones - though the musical ones will still influence my decisions.

I also have to consider what space is already present in the mix. If I'm doing a jazz project or Indie rock project - chances are there's some room captures - and I want to make sure that my reverbs make some kind of sense with the sounds that are already there. I'm not going to be tossing on a lot of room reverbs if the piece was recorded in a concert hall.

But, since we're on the Hip Hop forum - often we're talking about something purely musical with very little natural room sound - it becomes a much more blank canvas (though sometimes there's reverb off of synths or samples to be considered). Also, the aesthetic is much more about impact, rather than realism, in a Hip Hop recording.

Choosing a reverb is part gut, part brain, for me. I'll choose reverbs either to emulate a style, or to capitalize on what that reverb will easily provide. If I'm looking for breadth or air - a hall is a good choice. If I'm looking to provide thickness, a plate may be the way to go. One thing I've learned about reverb is that there is a strange psychoacoustic effect on the dry sound - it starts to change the way we perceive the dry sound. So if a vocal is naturally dull, and doesn't seem to be eq'ing nicely, one can use a bright reverb to provide some life to the top end.

The reason short plates seem to work so well on snares for example is because plates have an even frequency response, and no separate reflections - so the plate sounds almost like a continuation of the actual sustain. If the tail is short enough, and the reverb is tucked in just seems to add a little forward punch - almost like compression can. Rap vocals, I'll tend to favor a short room algorithm - because I want air around the vocals, but I don't want long tails messing with the rhythm. I also choose the reverb based on the color it adds to the vocals - different units and different algorithm models seem to enhance different tones.


great thread!!!

K - long post. I just don't know how to answer those questions in a more concise way...

I'll also add that choosing a space can come down to adding something unique into a mix. Sometimes a weird space can set off a chain reaction along the course of a mix that opens up interesting doors.
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #111
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by KT1 ➡️
I have never heard of a reverse reverb. That being said I have applied reverb on some audio and then reversed the audio to create the effect i was looking for. Is this what we are talking about?
A reversed reverb generates the reverb from the end point of the tail and ends at the early reflection. It's a wonky effect, that I don't use to often, but can be cool for transitions or bizzarro spaces. Probably something I should play around with more.
Old 14th January 2011 | Show parent
  #112
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ISayItLikeItIs ➡️
I'm interested to see what people have to say about this.

I don't think too much..
I just pick a reverb based on my experience. I'll pretty much know what I'm looking for from the start. If the verb I picked doesn't work, I'll try another one. I know which is the right one when I hear it.

To me:
Plate = Smooth, clean, it has a "sheen" to it
Hall = Big room, auditorium type sound
Room = More damp, varies from dark to bright
Ambience = Very small room, sometimes unrealistic dimensions
Chamber = Complex diffusion, resonance, like a church or something
Spring = Old school sounding, "grainy"
Gated = Sounds gated.. I rarely use gates on reverb..
Reverse = Rarely use this either..
Gated reverbs are very useful in dense mixes. Your brain fills in the tails, but since the tail isn't there it doesn't get in the way of other sounds. Also helps if you want a big reverb sound in a fast tempo piece.
Old 15th January 2011 | Show parent
  #113
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🎧 10 years
this thread should be a sticky. just sayin.
Old 15th January 2011 | Show parent
  #114
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Karloff70's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis ➡️
this thread should be a sticky. just sayin.
One more vote for this being a sticky and nice one Storyville! A lot of goodness here for people to grab and use....
Old 15th January 2011 | Show parent
  #115
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🎧 10 years
Storyville you rock!
Old 15th January 2011 | Show parent
  #116
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by godphaser ➡️
Storyville you rock!
+1

I will "report" this thread, asking for it to be made a sticky. Ken, Karloff and everybody else, do the same.
Old 16th January 2011 | Show parent
  #117
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🎧 10 years
What is another name for "Duration"? I was practicing your technigue on reverb while using Reason and the reverb plugs I have don't have Duration.
The names of the functions/buttons it has are called ---- In the Reverb Section(Decay, HF Damp, HI EQ, Dry-Wet, Algorihm, Size, Mod Rate, Room Shape, LF Damp, Wall Irreg, Predelay, and Mod Amount). In the EQ section they are called (Low Gain, Low Frequency, Parameter Gain, Parameter Frequency, Parameter Q), And in the Gate Section they are called (Threshold, Decay Mod, Trig Source, High Pass, Attack, Hold, and Release)


Next question ---------- Now my reverb device in Reason has pre-delay, but I also have another device that is a delay on its own. For the delay part from your post. Should I set both devices at lets say 63ms, or if not which device will work better?


Last Question ---------- What is another name for Diffusion?
Old 16th January 2011 | Show parent
  #118
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Answers in bold below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by g.t.p. ➡️
What is another name for "Duration"? I was practicing your technigue on reverb while using Reason and the reverb plugs I have don't have Duration.
The names of the functions/buttons it has are called ---- In the Reverb Section(Decay, HF Damp, HI EQ, Dry-Wet, Algorihm, Size, Mod Rate, Room Shape, LF Damp, Wall Irreg, Predelay, and Mod Amount). In the EQ section they are called (Low Gain, Low Frequency, Parameter Gain, Parameter Frequency, Parameter Q), And in the Gate Section they are called (Threshold, Decay Mod, Trig Source, High Pass, Attack, Hold, and Release)

The "Decay" parameter is most likely your tail duration.

Next question ---------- Now my reverb device in Reason has pre-delay, but I also have another device that is a delay on its own. For the delay part from your post. Should I set both devices at lets say 63ms, or if not which device will work better?

Just use the pre-delay on the reverb unit itself. Set that to whatever time constant works best mathematically - THEN, use your ears and listen to how the rhythm of the reverb seems to lock into the track. Turn the reverb way up to hear this. Adjust the pre-delay according to what makes the rhythm gel together best - it may not be what the math says it will be. You might be better off at 60ms, or 68ms. VERY IMPORTANT - the math is a starting place - THE FEEL is what matters.


Last Question ---------- What is another name for Diffusion?

Wall Irregularity would be another name for diffusion. Scattering would also work. Sometimes diffusion is tied up in a control labelled "density." Depends on the reverb unit.

Old 16th January 2011 | Show parent
  #119
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🎧 10 years
Appreciate it...Now

How can I turn up the reverb without a volume button, my guess is that it has something to do with, how I arranged the devices.

The way I arranged the device where..... input to output like Sound>Mixer>Reverb>Combinator>Main Mixer
Old 16th January 2011 | Show parent
  #120
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Storyville's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by g.t.p. ➡️
Appreciate it...Now

How can I turn up the reverb without a volume button, my guess is that it has something to do with, how I arranged the devices.

The way I arranged the device where..... input to output like Sound>Mixer>Reverb>Combinator>Main Mixer
Can you route the output of the reverb's wet signal to it's own channel on the main mixer?

So

Sound>Mixer>>>>>>>>Main Mixer
|
aux send
|
Reverb>>>>>>>Main Mixer

Or send an aux off the main mixer to the reverb unit and return it on another channel back on the main mixer?
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