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gettings ready to advertise my home studio as as business..a little guidance?
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #31
Lives for gear
 
Alxi's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
My two humble cents.

I have just a bit less equipement then you.
i have a degree in sound design and recording technics ( graduated in 2005 ) i'm 30 and i have my own place.

I charge between 15$ and 20$ an hour ( depends on the gig.. and the customer ) I'm barely making enough to live and my closest competitors are charging 30-35$ an hour. They have album credits ( wich i don't ) a good rep and (most of them ) the work ethincs to back it up.

I think 50$ an hour is crazy insane for a home base studio.

You have only 1 pre, 1 mic and if you have a SE filter you probably don't have a booth, wich is not the end of the world but i wouldn't expect people to pay 50$ an hour regardless of what equipement you have if they have to stand in a corner of the room to record.

Don't forget the safety issue. I woudn't advertsie my equipement, just my services if i was you i wouldn't give my phone number right away. An email adresse or msn contact should be enough.

Always meet your costumers at a near-by store of coffee house or something so they don't see where you live right away. Also ask around if you don't know them personnaly before meeting them. Turn down the gig if you have any doubt.

Ask your futur customer to send you mp3 of what they have allready done... you can tell alot by the way it sounds .. and by what they're talking about.

Good ehtincs will attract good customers in the long run.

Good luck

-Alxi-
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #32
Lives for gear
 
irthwirm's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
don't let anyone in this forum tell you you can't do it. That's just stupid. You gotta filter some of these responses. But listen to what the general concepts are and make your best decision off of that. There's some good advise to take from it. Do it and learn from it, it's all steps forward to where you want to go.
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #33
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nfinite2006 ➑️
avalon 737=thousands

is there any possible way to post on this board without gettin' smart ass people in your thread?
and this is not the final this just something i wrote a few days back to get an idea how i wanted it.
You can argue with me if u want, but I couldn't sworn you asked for help.

If I read something that looked remotely like this in ad, I would definitely laugh.

Don't you want people to tell you this BEFORE you advertise??

Make up your damn mind -- u want criticism so u can make it better or not? lol, same ol same


And btw, actual money wasn't my point, it was your terrible wording..
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #34
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by QD843 ➑️
and this might not be such a good line.............I’ve invested hundreds & thousands of dollars
Dude, you're hittin on a touchy subject now.. he's very protective over that line. It's a prize winner.
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #35
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryst ➑️
(although you should check your spelling too, coyotekells heh).
So true, good thing I'm aware of this trouble of mine, and appreciate other's pointing it out.. so before I post my "add" (lol) I will get GS to hack it to shreds for me...

Hell, I'll even let you attack the "final"!! (because, what really makes it final?)
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #36
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
I have about 10 times the gear and 20 years more experience (with major label credits).

And recently I'm hurting to get my home-based studio booked at $50/hr.
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #37
vdz
Gear Head
 
🎧 15 years
50 a hour you should have at least a hd setup and at least 5-10 years experience..
i think your rate should be around 15-20 the most
and when you been doing it for a while consistently then it should go up to the 25-30
Old 30th January 2009 | Show parent
  #38
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
I'd say go for it. I ain't give out all the game. U can find your way. Make a plan and stick to it. Get sme clientel in the door at $20 and after that put the work eithic up to justify that. As you continue you will get better and better. Stack your bread, spread your name, and get work to justify price increases. You'll probably start out doing mixtape work, but you gotta start. Don't let the naysayers discourage you, but at the same time take heed to what you read here and take what you can from it. If you make a plan and stick to it, you'll do just fine.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #39
Gear Addict
 
Nfinite2006's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Thanks for the advice guys...and i there are some people in here bitter as hell at me right now...sorry for earlier posts..

after seeing a lot of the posts in here i will be dropping my rate to something around $15-20ish/hr.

I think some of you guys are right telling me to wait a few years to get out of my moms house..and THEN start a studio. I just thought it was a good idea get great practice(and make a little extra money)..i am currently attending this school in Maryland "Omega Studios' School of applied recordings arts & sciences":Omega Recording Studios, Washington, DC

Trying to learn all i can & getting PT certification...just wanted extra practice.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #40
Lives for gear
 
tonymission's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Entertaining thread lol


You made the right decision and it's good to see you understand by the end of it. Growing up with a single mom, my responsibility as her son and essentially head of the house was to look out for her (in all ways). As someone who's seen a lot of bad **** in not much of a lifetime, I can tell you just for her sake, and you doing the right thing, (as her son) would be to not bring cats up in your spot and generally just be pretty mindful of your gear and all that.

Not to mention the funny side of that like her "baking cookies for the boys" and you trying to portray some semblance of professionalism while charging people ... probably wouldn't work


EDIT - ill try to be solution oriented here... find some up and coming artists in your area and tell them you're going to school, got gear and will do some free mixes for them. if they like em, great ... if not, no problem. then if you do good work with that, then pick something marginal that you can work your way up with. per track payment probably and keep it LOW LOW ... thinking mixtapes here not hit singles. this way cats dont gotta know where you stay and you can still start getting your name out ... in school, make some friendships based on character and work ethic and start a lil studio with them to keep costs low.. boom, you go from there :P
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #41
Lives for gear
 
Yoda117's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysoulman ➑️
Sadly,I dont accept unsolicited rap projects at my studio for the plain fact that imho a vast amount of them,here in Philly anyway are thugs and wannabe thug morons.
If a rap act comes through who is represented by someone who I implicitly trust and that they can vouch for,I still would have to have them checked out by their LEGAL names,s.s.numbers,addresses,police reports.
I do not trust anyone.
Okay, so it's not just me then that feels this way about a number of the rap scene in Philly.

I actually felt safer when I was in Beirut compared to a few sessions I was asked to pop into when some of these folks wanted a quickie VO for their new album.

Good times... good times.

/Anyone who has met me can tell you that I'm the last guy you'd think to call for some of these, but apparently they liked the job done.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #42
Lives for gear
 
mdjice's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
nowdays, you can get a studio with a SSL 9000 for the price you are asking. as for mixing for $500 a song (since most songs will have as many tracks as you mentioned) you need to be extremly good, have some analog gear and have some industry credits already. A top mixer might cut a break and do a mix for $1000 for an Indy artist, a GOOD but unknown Mix engineer with a lot of outboard gear, industry cred. and years of experience will usually get between 300 and $500. again, I think you are asking too much.
Having a studio at home as a business is very possible but you take a risk everytime you let someone in that you don't know, on the other end people you DO know don't EVER want to pay a dime since you are their "friends" right?
since you are living with your parents remember that when you open your door to strangers you put your family at risk. I know many people who got robbed of their equipment.
When someone books a session, you never know who they will bring and if that person talks about how bad ass your gear is...someone might ask for your address , after all they don't care They don't know you...word of mouth travels fast.
that said, all you can do is try and see. Leave and Learn.
Good luck
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #43
Gear Addict
 
Nfinite2006's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
thanks for the advice mdjice
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #44
Here for the gear
 
🎧 10 years
[quote=Nfinite2006;3866243]yea im still living with my mom,

Imma be honest with you...from listening to your music, I think starting a low rate is what you need because you still need a lot of practice. I agree with mdjice, but there is a problem, you dont know how long mdjice has been mixing and mastering songs. So if he's charging that high, and people are actually paying for it? I take it he's good, and i dont think your up in that level yet, i'm a beginner myself, but i have a good ear for good music no matter what kind of music it is. So if you charge a low rate to start out, and you get a lot of business, then the better you would be. A word of advice, i record myself, make my beats, and write the songs, is really hard to do all of that, because each is so sensative to mixing and mastering. Just food for thought. And trust me, as you get more practice the better you'll get and word will get around, then after you start doing work as good as mdjice, then you can charge all that, and you dont even have to worry about idiots worrying about spelling, just stick to your music bro...stay safe!
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #45
Lives for gear
 
phillysoulman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
personally,if I were you I wouldnt charge anything...just use your time to PRACTICE your craft,and when you are really ready,THEN START CHARGING a low rate and go from there.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #46
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
It's really hard to make a profit right now around here with a small home studio. Everyone is just broke in this economy. heh

I'm currently in the process of shifting my home studio business more into production / investment mode, not really charging by the hour as much but trying to locate really good talent that could bring in royalties through producer / songwriter partnerships. I'm not sure how it will work out but we'll see.

Honestly, I find it hard to stay booked at $30 an hour or whatever with most of the people who would pay that having access to their own daws and home studios and not really caring about the higher quality level, but more so about the money.

People are hurting for money right now. If they can use Reaper for free and spend a few hundred bucks for a mic and record at home many who have to pay out of there pockets are far less likely to hire a studio.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #47
Lives for gear
 
bgrotto's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysoulman ➑️
personally,if I were you I wouldnt charge anything...just use your time to PRACTICE your craft,and when you are really ready,THEN START CHARGING a low rate and go from there.
This is good advice...if you aren't really ready to fairly charge clients for your work, you might end up with a bunch of unhappy clients, wondering why they paid you, which could damage your reputation before you even have a chance to make one. Better to work for free till people WANT to pay you. I mean, has anyone ever offered to hire you, unsolicited, based on what they've already heard of your work? If not, maybe you should hold off on charging till you can build a client base and demo reel.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #48
Lives for gear
 
weezul's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
I have my first charged per hour session tomorrow, it is a somewhat friend of mine though, he is on the 1st year of a BMus degree, and im on the 3rd.. im charging Β£15 an hour tracking time and said I might charge a little more on top for the mixing/gentle limiting (see what i did there ) I've done other work for people I know, mostly free including recording a full album for a bunch of folk musicians which was a load of work but worth it.
I'm on a very modest set up (ProFire2626, Sm57,58, RV15 valve mic, pt8 etc) no booth or anything fancy, and its only a keyboard singer songwriter demo but I'm gonna see how it goes and see how word spreads. I teach for Β£15 an hour, so it makes sense for me to track too, seeing as its not all that different, I use my PT rig to amplify me and my students, so I can't charge a great deal more for pressing record!! I would lower your rates and just see how it goes. I think at this level, people are more paying for your ears than your equipment, at least that's how it feels to me because we have full recording studios at college!
I guess this message doesn't really help apart from I'm in the same boat and excited!
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #49
Lives for gear
 
mdjice's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
here is the deal, you got do this because you LOVE it NOT because of the money...if you see this as a way to make a living, you are wrong. before you can make a living out of Music it will take YEARS.
You need knowledge and experience along with contacts that alone cannot be bought like gear.
I sure didn't start doing music thinking it was going to pay my bills. To this day even though I make a living in this industry I don't see it a a sure thing. If you want to make big bucks or have a steady pay check get an office Job. If you want to do something you love with the possibility to make a few bucks out of it then go head and keep going. that said You have to master your craft. Read a lot, practice a lot talk a lot with other engineers/ artists/ producers etc...
Few people now days want to pay for studio time so you have to offer something they don't have or can't do for example:
a treated room, Outboard gear, eperience in mixing or tracking etc...
I know It's not what you want to hear but before thinking about "how am I gonna make money with my studio" you sould think more like "How can I get better at what I do with my studio".
Once you get really good people around will hear your work and they will offer to pay you for your services
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #50
Gear Addict
 
Nfinite2006's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
i shall continue to practice then

for a while i did alot of recording for free just to better my skills...and i have gotten better over time with and i want to continue to do so.

The reason i started charging was because in my head i do think my work is worth something i think everyone's work is worth something if they work hard at it... i think if you take your craft seriously and you put your blood,sweat & tears into it..i think its fair for someone to feel like they deserve something for it...nothing in this world is free so that's why i wanted to charge.

I completely understand what you guys mean when you say i could run into clients and them ruining my rep before i even start one because they did pay...but most people these days won't offer to pay you(well unless they are truly dedicated to their craft) if they know they can get the service for free...that right there alone states that i don't take my craft serious enough to ask for a fee.

Its not really about the money for me i truly LOVE music and i ENJOY doing this and i ENJOY learning stuff everyday about this...i just feel that if anyone takes this serious they should be making something off of it even if its $2/hr..its still something


just my 0.2 cents.
Old 31st January 2009 | Show parent
  #51
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
It's not unfair to ask a regular joe wage for recording at whatever level you can offer.

At that rate, you're gettin paid like you were flippin burgers, but you're learning and making music. You'll get lots more business, and the session will be less stressful because no one is sweating the 10/hr or whatever ask. At that price, they can't really complain that you're not a pro.


I make my living off a project studio. I'm doing less hourly rate stuff lately, and while it doesn't earn as much upfront, I get the most out of doing per-song project rate deals with artists I know have the potential to make a great song.

I spend far more time on it, and become very involved in the project, but I learn a lot more and the out come (product) is better for everyone and will be worthy to show other clients to get more biz. As I am a songwriter, singer, producer, beatmaker, engineer, etc. all on some level, I enjoy helping a project from many angles, and I can offer assistance that other studios (much better than mine equip. wise) failed to do for these same clients.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #52
Here for the gear
 
countjus's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
dont get robbed!!!!!tutttutttutttutttutt
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #53
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by countjus ➑️
dont get robbed!!!!!tutttutttutttutttutt
Every home studio guy who lets people in his home he doesn't know should have (seriously) two weapons on his person.

One unloaded that can and will be initially "taken away" by most potential robbers and another loaded one with the safety off in an ankle holster. ...maybe I shouldn't have put that out there but there it is.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #54
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence ➑️
Every home studio guy who lets people in his home he doesn't know should have (seriously) two weapons on his person.

One unloaded that can and will be initially "taken away" by most potential robbers and another loaded one with the safety off in an ankle holster. ...maybe I shouldn't have put that out there but there it is.
The day I need to do this is the day I need to rethink some things about this trade.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #55
Gear Head
 
phsyke2k's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
You already know what you want to do by now. There's no refuting that. I'm glad you definitely dropped the prices, I made that mistake when I first started selling my services. Damn near no one walked thru when I was charging $30/hour. But to this day I still don't charge that much and my setup is leaning toward the high end of home studios. Working with 737s, 1073s, a 800G, Brauner VMA and an HD3 system, I still only charge $25/hour for the simple fact that no matter how nice the gear is (and there's more), the music will only be as good as the person arraning and mixing it. I'm not horribly bad at my craft(I wouldn't have the gear if so), but I've only been seriously mixing for 5 years. I'm still perfecting that, so I'm not gonna touch the title of "engineer" yet (way too many ppl do). Keep working on getting some weight in the game and listen to those who came before you (as I did), that's where the knowledge that no school can teach you is hidden.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #56
Moderator
 
psycho_monkey's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Anyone working out of a bedroom in their mum's house - or for that matter in their own house - should be selling themselves as a service, not their "studio".

Nothing wrong with working out of a spare bedroom - I do it myself quite a lot, when I'm not on studio sessions - but I'd never advertise it as a studio and encourage people to come round. To my mind that screams "wannabe" rather than "up and coming".

It follows that what you charge should be in relation to your skills, not what gear you have.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #57
Gear Maniac
 
PinnacleProdUK's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey ➑️
Anyone working out of a bedroom in their mum's house - or for that matter in their own house - should be selling themselves as a service, not their "studio".

Nothing wrong with working out of a spare bedroom - I do it myself quite a lot, when I'm not on studio sessions - but I'd never advertise it as a studio and encourage people to come round. To my mind that screams "wannabe" rather than "up and coming".

It follows that what you charge should be in relation to your skills, not what gear you have.
Sorry but i disagree...... Just because its in a bedroom and not commercial doesn't make it not a studio..... If he has means to record, mix and master the tracks and get it burned to cd as a finished product then he has a studio regardless of the size...... You could be using free recording software such as Audacity, it be in your bedroom, have a basic 8 channel Behringer mixer and only one sm57 using bloody hi-fi speakers.... that could be called a project "studio"..... it doesnt have to be full of gear worth hundreds of thousands of pounds and be making over a thousand pound a week from clients to be called a studio....

And in the OP, you said 48 hours cancellation at the top and then 24 hours at the nottom, i think you need to have another read of it and sort out the errors.

I do also think 50 is a little too high but its entirely up to you.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #58
Gear Nut
 
Stratgirl's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToneCre8 ➑️
You're not ready man. You're listing things under "equipment" that really is not. Power conditioner? Head phones, Hard drives? Seriously man wait a few more years and get some weight under your belt. Just because you CAN do a thing doesn't always mean you SHOULD. Don't run a recording studio at home while living with your mom.
+1 thumbsup
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #59
Gear Addict
 
Nfinite2006's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyotekells ➑️
It's not unfair to ask a regular joe wage for recording at whatever level you can offer.

At that rate, you're gettin paid like you were flippin burgers, but you're learning and making music. You'll get lots more business, and the session will be less stressful because no one is sweating the 10/hr or whatever ask. At that price, they can't really complain that you're not a pro.


I make my living off a project studio. I'm doing less hourly rate stuff lately, and while it doesn't earn as much upfront, I get the most out of doing per-song project rate deals with artists I know have the potential to make a great song.

I spend far more time on it, and become very involved in the project, but I learn a lot more and the out come (product) is better for everyone and will be worthy to show other clients to get more biz. As I am a songwriter, singer, producer, beatmaker, engineer, etc. all on some level, I enjoy helping a project from many angles, and I can offer assistance that other studios (much better than mine equip. wise) failed to do for these same clients.
same here man, i am rapper,engineer,songwriter as well...and thats the same boat im in..i love helping people.

PinnacleProdUK, i was just going to say the same exact thing you did about a studio being based of a home...i think anywhere you can be creative and record,create,mix some form of music is your studio...

i will lower my prices you guys are right..im just going to spend alot more time honing my craft.
Old 1st February 2009 | Show parent
  #60
Lives for gear
 
orangeoctane's Avatar
Don't let anyone tell you what to charge. Pick a number you think is *reasonable* and give it a try. People will ALWAYS pay for what they cannot or WILL NOT do for themselves.

Some clients just want to know that you are going to take care of them, share their vision, and have a passion to reach the end result. Of course you must be able to get there or you will quickly sink.

Your bottom line at the end of the month will tell you whether you are charging too much or not enough depending on your goals. It might tell you that you are ready to expand your business or it might tell you that this will only be a hobby for fun. Make adjustments accordingly and see which side of the fence you land on.

I can tell you in the world of Web design (another side business of mine) you can find guys who are willing to do entire sites for a couple hundred bucks, others that charge $2500 per page (not per site) and then everywhere else in between. Find the client that is willing to pay for you to hold their hand through the process and get them the results they want and they will pay a reasonable price. If you can't find enough of these clients then you have to make a decision whether you need to charge less and work more, or whether your business model just isn't able to support your financial goals which is a very real possibility.

Good luck no matter what!
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