Quantcast
PHILLY micing a Violin - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
PHILLY micing a Violin
Old 23rd January 2009
  #1
Lives for gear
 
skiroy's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
PHILLY micing a Violin

Yo philly I have mic a violin tommorrow.I know you have experience with this.We only have one violin so we are going to have to stack it.I want 2-3 bowed stacks a nd a pizzy.What type of mic and what mic placement would you suggest.Any mic suggestions? What about a sm7 or a tube?I have a babybottle but I think it might be too warm for a hip hop string.We want to make it to sound like a sample and we are going to chop it.

I also have a e100,trion 7000,sm57,SP cs5.
Old 23rd January 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 
phillysoulman's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiroy โžก๏ธ
Yo philly I have mic a violin tommorrow.I know you have experience with this.We only have one violin so we are going to have to stack it.I want 2-3 bowed stacks a nd a pizzy.What type of mic and what mic placement would you suggest.Any mic suggestions? What about a sm7 or a tube?I have a babybottle but I think it might be too warm for a hip hop string.We want to make it to sound like a sample and we are going to chop it.

I also have a e100,trion 7000,sm57,SP cs5.
It aint gonna work stacking one violin.
Its gonna sound like ****. Forget it,homes.
You have to have at least six violins,two violas and a cello in a good recording space with at least a 10-12 foor ceiling for a decent string session.

Two 87s or 414s above the vioins, one 87 or 414 between the violas and the same for the cello and two more LDCs for the room.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #3
Lives for gear
 
bgrotto's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
๐ŸŽง 15 years
Yeah, man. You're screwed. Much of the sound of ensemble playing is, well, the ensemble PLAYING!!! Good luck anyway. If you have a part sequenced, try adding one or two real violins on top, and you might come away with something convincing.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #4
Lives for gear
 
The MPCist's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
+1.

Sequence your string part, overdub some live violins on top of it, mix it in. That's probably the best bet for you at this time.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #5
Gear Nut
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
While sequencing a violin part and using overdubs isn't a bad idea and maybe your best option, I wouldn't give up on the stacking. Trying to get a big ensemble sound is too much to expect, but something smaller might be possible.

My guess is for stacking to work you really need a decent sounding and quiet room. Set up a stereo pair of mics (at least 2-3 feet away and pointing down some from above), and for each take reposition the violinist as if he were a different member of the ensemble (perhaps you should think of a trio or a quartet and reposition him somewhat like that). You don't want the repositioning to be too radical, but just enough for the mics to pick up the different subtelties of the room's acoustics and also to have just a little variety in distance from player to mic. The other thing about ensembles is the different members tend to play different instruments, both violins, violas, cellos, etc. but also if there are multiple violinists they're gonna play different violins. So if your violinist has more than one violin, take advantage, and if he can get a hold of a viola (or owns one) do that too. It's not hard for a violinist to play a viola, though playing a cello or stand-up is much more of a stretch.

For mics I'd use either condensers or ribbons. Warm mics are good for violins in my opinion, but really I'd experiment with each of your mics to see which sounds best. Also I wouldn't worry too much about recording it in such a way that it works for samples, except that you'll want it to be a little dry (but too dry and the violin will sound unnatural). Get it sounding as natural and real as possible and then tweak the recordings as necessary for samples.

This is coming from a violinist whose recorded himself a number of times and has never successfully stacked but has also never gone through all the steps above! I tend to record only single parts.

Also, perhaps rather than just spending all your time attempting to get a good stacked sound, you might want to record the violinist doing some solo stuff cause that stuff is easier and it also works for samples.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #6
Lives for gear
 
MYAMS's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
Layering an ensemble section from samples works well blended with live solo passes... I definetely wouldnt record a bunch of solo takes and layer em to try to get an ensemble.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #7
Lives for gear
 
phillysoulman's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
A string section playing TOGETHER as an ensemble is what creates the "thickness" which is caused by the strings sounds modulating or chorusing.
NEVER cut corners when recording real strings.
It WILL sound like dog ****.
๐Ÿ“ Reply

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 1178 views: 265218
Avatar for bill5
bill5 2 weeks ago
replies: 16 views: 8900
Avatar for borko
borko 15th January 2012
replies: 84 views: 10393
Avatar for api2500
api2500 9th July 2010
replies: 383 views: 75183
Avatar for outUVphaze
outUVphaze 6th February 2021
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump