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E-Bass for Hip Hop (around $400)...??
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #31
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phillysoulman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Methlab ➑️
No..6 string adds a C.

But you can always tune it down.
I stand corrected.
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #32
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phillysoulman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
The mechanics are understood. I was asking more about whether or not a novice should start on a 5 but Methlab answered. Thanks though!
Id say start on a nice 4 string,like a Fender Jazz which is easier to play because of the neck.
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #33
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JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Hey PSM and Meth, thanks!

I am gonna purchase a bass this weekend!
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #34
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phillysoulman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
Hey PSM and Meth, thanks!

I am gonna purchase a bass this weekend!
Yeah,the Jazz bass has a neck that is a bit slimmer and therefore easier to finger.
Good luck and please let us know how you make out!!
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #35
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysoulman ➑️
Last I heard,Hub was no longer with the Roots.
He is an awesome all around bass player.
Hes not, someone told me he doesnt really play electric bass at all anymore. Apparently hes a classically trained double bass player.
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #36
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
Forgive my bass noobness but here it goes:

I have been programming basslines on my tracks using synths and sampled bass for awhile now. Bass has always been my favorite part of a song instrument wise. I have never much experience playing a real bass, but I would like to start.

I use a couple multi sampled bass patches such as Reason's Electric Bass" and I find that there are times when the notes do not go low enough when I try to replay my "synth bass line" using a real bass. I do understand that this is a physical limitation of the 4 string basses that propellerheads multisampled when they created the refill I use.

I know that one answer is "play a different riff fool! what else!" but let's pretend that is not an option.

A 5 string or 6 string bass would handle some of the notes in the lower register that commonly go "missing" but is it generally kosher for a bass novice to learn to play on a 5 string versus a 4 string? I am one of those "spend my money once" types and I don't wanna have the same problem once I become fairly decent enough to play live bass over my own tracks.

What's the general consensus? Thanks in advance.
Teachers will tell you shouldnt start on a 5, but i disagree. Learning on a 5 is just fine in my opinion especially since you dont have to move around the neck as much. Only problem you would encounter is if you had small hands or something. 5 strings can be much larger depending on the brand
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #37
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JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Thanks. Please excuse the atrocious typos in my original message...
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #38
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
This brings up a good point. 5s have a wide neck. Now, I do not have huge hands or anything, but I can still play them. The Conklin 7 was a slight PITA for me though.

String spacing on bass is very important. The J bass is genius because the neck narrows closer to the tuners, but the strings at the bridge are wide and easy to slap on. I was a big time Funk slapper back in the day and this made a difference for me, especially in live settings.

5 strings can have very narrow string spacing. It just makes slapping those speed licks a lot trickier, so I would recommend getting a 5 with wider string spacing if you think that is a style that you may implement.

I personally can slap, play with 3 fingers or use a pick. And I would also recommend you learn all 3 styles because you never know what sound you may want down the road.

I was forced to use a pick by a producer on a session when I was young and I HATED it. Finally, I joined up with some speed metal guys who really wanted that pick tone, and I spent about 6 months and now can shred with one.

Once again, bass is all about being able to do ANYTHING. It is the best instrument ever if you love all kinds of music and want to play many styles.
Old 22nd January 2009 | Show parent
  #39
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Methlab ➑️
This brings up a good point. 5s have a wide neck. Now, I do not have huge hands or anything, but I can still play them. The Conklin 7 was a slight PITA for me though.

String spacing on bass is very important. The J bass is genius because the neck narrows closer to the tuners, but the strings at the bridge are wide and easy to slap on. I was a big time Funk slapper back in the day and this made a difference for me, especially in live settings.

5 strings can have very narrow string spacing. It just makes slapping those speed licks a lot trickier, so I would recommend getting a 5 with wider string spacing if you think that is a style that you may implement.

I personally can slap, play with 3 fingers or use a pick. And I would also recommend you learn all 3 styles because you never know what sound you may want down the road.

I was forced to use a pick by a producer on a session when I was young and I HATED it. Finally, I joined up with some speed metal guys who really wanted that pick tone, and I spent about 6 months and now can shred with one.

Once again, bass is all about being able to do ANYTHING. It is the best instrument ever if you love all kinds of music and want to play many styles.
I'm terrible with a pick, but I can fool you using my thumb nail sometimes. I really need to learn though.

And string spacing is the reason why I put flatwounds on my 5. The strings are to narrow my 4 has the rounds for slapping.
Old 4th February 2009 | Show parent
  #40
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JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Bringing this up again..

As I said I would, I acquired a 4 string Jazz. Right now I've been learning (this is my first bass) in the common EADG tuning.

Do you guys prefer any specific tuning seeing how hip hop can definitely use lower bass notes at times.

I messed around with drop d (dadg) as well. I have been reading that some guys restring and tune a 4 string to BEAD to make it similar to a five. I also read about dropping one whole step so that you have DGCF.

I am guessing this is just based on individual preference and the song being played but I am just trying to get an idea of what most of you bassists involved with hip hop use in general. I am purchasing some flatwounds soon, as I LOVE the deep bass that reggae/dub players achieve, though I couldn't find anything on the bass forums like talkbass.com in regards to what tuning they typically use.

Thanks for any assistance.
Old 4th February 2009 | Show parent
  #41
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
pics of your jazz bass?

I drop mine to D..more for Rock. Honestly, for hip hop, I prefer E tuning. There is no way in hell I would drop the tuning to B..that will ruin the tone


Keep it at EADG or dropped D. A lot of times, if I have a track in D, I do the James Jamerson thing, and play it on the 5th fret and drop down to the bottom string for that nice low F# walk up.

To do this, use your pinky on the D, and your index on the F#. You will get it when you play it, and know what I'm saying when you hear it.

Reggae is usually in standard...but they use flatwounds..which I would not recommend getting unless you only want that one sound from your bass. You can mess with the tone knobs, and put foam under the strings (near the bridge) and get a nice dub sound. I love dub...Im a huge Prince Jammy fan.
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #42
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Alxi's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Interesting.

If i had known any of this a few years back i would've bought a passive bass. I'm really into the James Jamerson kind of sound and playing style.

Any takers on a 5 strings Active Yamaha lol

-Alxi-
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #43
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
Bringing this up again..

As I said I would, I acquired a 4 string Jazz. Right now I've been learning (this is my first bass) in the common EADG tuning.

Do you guys prefer any specific tuning seeing how hip hop can definitely use lower bass notes at times.

I messed around with drop d (dadg) as well. I have been reading that some guys restring and tune a 4 string to BEAD to make it similar to a five. I also read about dropping one whole step so that you have DGCF.

I am guessing this is just based on individual preference and the song being played but I am just trying to get an idea of what most of you bassists involved with hip hop use in general. I am purchasing some flatwounds soon, as I LOVE the deep bass that reggae/dub players achieve, though I couldn't find anything on the bass forums like talkbass.com in regards to what tuning they typically use.

Thanks for any assistance.
Honestly tuning is not that important, learning is though. Regardless of the tuning you use, you will still be able to apply the same concepts on 5 strings, 6 strings, drop D basses, etc.

Plenty of classic hip hop tracks are played on 4 strings, same with Reggae music. You dont need a 5 string to go low.

There are basses strung BEAD, but in order to do that and not make it sound like garbage you would need to either get a new nut (place where strings go at top of the neck near the headstock.) or file the one you already have to make the larger strings required for that tuning fit. You may also need a new bridge too, but that depends on the type you have. You would be better off buying one that comes like that or one that has been properly modified off ebay.

Getting flatwounds is fine, I love them, but I urge you to research the particular set you are buying carefully. You could just ask me also because I have used quite a few flatwound brands. They are also typically more expensive than roundwound strings.

The reason for this is because most people do not know what they are getting into, they just think about all the low end they will get. Some brands of flatwound strings have extremely high tension, to the point where a new bass player would struggle playing them because they have not developed enough dexterity or strength in their fingers.

Another consideration to make is the strain on the neck. The higher the tension, the more strain it puts. I reccomend finding a music store with someone, who knows how to properly set up instruments, or look up a local guitar luthier that can do it. DO NOT go to Sam Ash or Guitar Center to have your bass set up. Just give whoever you find the strings and the bass and tell em you want a setup. Shouldnt take more than a day and it will cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $30. Seeing a bass neck warped by flatwounds is a painful sight.

Good thing about flatwounds though is that you wont have to change them for quite a while, I typically keep mine on until they dont stay in tune anymore.
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #44
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JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Thanks for the deep knowledge.

What flatwounds do you recommend I go with, as I AM a beginner who may have issues with tension/dexterity/etc???

The Guitar Center local to me is not allowed to service any guitar, but every Tuesday they have a "guitar tech" (from I dunno where) come out for about 5 hours and he is allowed to do servicing. Should I still shy away and go to a local mom/pop place? I can't stand the pro audio department in GC and I don't want just anyone working on it.

I guess I will just stick to standard tuning for now since I need to learn it first. I just like knowing I could achieve the same low notes as my synth if needed with alternate tuning.

Thanks in advance.
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #45
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mdjice's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
get a real 808 bass guitar they are easy to play and perfect for Hip Hop but get the 4 strings one...or get a Jazz bass
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #46
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JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdjice ➑️
get a real 808 bass guitar they are easy to play and perfect for Hip Hop but get the 4 strings one...or get a Jazz bass
I already own a J. I believe you are referencing the super rare Roland G series basses? G-88? G-808?
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #47
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phillysoulman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
heh
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdjice ➑️
get a real 808 bass guitar they are easy to play and perfect for Hip Hop but get the 4 strings one...or get a Jazz bass
hehheh
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #48
Lives for gear
 
mdjice's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
I already own a J. I believe you are referencing the super rare Roland G series basses? G-88? G-808?
no. I'm referencing the 808 bass that everybody uses to create Hip Hop Records...where have you been for the past 20 years??heh

Attached Thumbnails
E-Bass for Hip Hop (around 0)...??-808bass.jpg  
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #49
Lives for gear
 
JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I didn't see the humor the first time because there were Roland guitar/bass synthesizers controllers.

Roland GR-33B Bass Guitar Synthesizer and G-88 Bass

Roland GR-300 Guitar Synthesizer and G-808 Guitar
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #50
Lives for gear
 
mdjice's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
I didn't see the humor the first time because there were Roland guitar/bass synthesizers controllers.

Roland GR-33B Bass Guitar Synthesizer and G-88 Bass

Roland GR-300 Guitar Synthesizer and G-808 Guitar
I know I know, i was just being a smart ass. I just made that bass up in photoshop after postingheh
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #51
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Don't get flatwounds yet man. I would strongly recommend not doing that. You are new to the instrument, and you need to learn how to make it sound however you want. This is the beauty of the J Bass..it can play in any genre.


I loved that 808 bass pic...haha! Nicely done!
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #52
Lives for gear
 
mdjice's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Methlab ➑️
Don't get flatwounds yet man. I would strongly recommend not doing that. You are new to the instrument, and you need to learn how to make it sound however you want. This is the beauty of the J Bass..it can play in any genre.


I loved that 808 bass pic...haha! Nicely done!
thanks heh
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #53
Lives for gear
 
JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Methlab ➑️
Don't get flatwounds yet man. I would strongly recommend not doing that. You are new to the instrument, and you need to learn how to make it sound however you want. This is the beauty of the J Bass..it can play in any genre.


I loved that 808 bass pic...haha! Nicely done!
I will take heed.

Methlab, you also the same methlab on ughh?
Old 5th February 2009 | Show parent
  #54
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
I will take heed.

Methlab, you also the same methlab on ughh?
Old 6th February 2009 | Show parent
  #55
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Eloheim's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juice Malone ➑️
I reccomend finding a music store with someone, who knows how to properly set up instruments, or look up a local guitar luthier that can do it. DO NOT go to Sam Ash or Guitar Center to have your bass set up. Just give whoever you find the strings and the bass and tell em you want a setup. Shouldnt take more than a day and it will cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $30.
I second this 100%. Find a local shop that specializes in guitars/has a good rep and give them the strings and bass and have them set it up for you.

When I actually read the manual (via internet) for my bass (that I was resurecting), I realized there was all this stuff about, "the strings should be between 1/32 and 1/16 of and inch from the fretboard at fret 'x'", and "make sure the the setup results in single-string octaves (12th frets) with..(some tone relative to the open and the other strings)..etc. Plus for me they cleaned the pickups and made sure all the electronics were working properly and all. Of course I don't know if they did all that stuff exactly, but my point is that having someone experienced do it for you will be far better than doin it yourself.

I printed off a copy of the manual and told em it was in the guitar bag in case they wanted to reference it. Cost me right around $25 too like Juice said. Plus developing a repour with an actual store owner is always better in the long run than dealing with the average GC employee who probly wont be there in 6 months.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #56
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysoulman ➑️
Go tell that to Anthony Jackson.
Have you ever heard of Jaco Pastorius,probably one of the greatest bassists of all time.
How about Stanley Clarke,Nathan East,Pino Paladino??
Read up and holla.

BTW, five string basses have more LOW END than 4 string basses.

heh

Jaco was the man. Stanley is well... there's only one Stanley.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #57
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
Thanks for the deep knowledge.

What flatwounds do you recommend I go with, as I AM a beginner who may have issues with tension/dexterity/etc???

The Guitar Center local to me is not allowed to service any guitar, but every Tuesday they have a "guitar tech" (from I dunno where) come out for about 5 hours and he is allowed to do servicing. Should I still shy away and go to a local mom/pop place? I can't stand the pro audio department in GC and I don't want just anyone working on it.

I guess I will just stick to standard tuning for now since I need to learn it first. I just like knowing I could achieve the same low notes as my synth if needed with alternate tuning.

Thanks in advance.
You are better off not worrying about all this to much. Talking about setups, flatwound strings, and alternate tunings is a waste of time because as of right now you dont even know how to hold a bass. Learn how to play, learn how to coax different tones out of your bass in a variety of ways, learn technique. If you cant do that, you will sound like garbage on any bass.

The above will ony lead you on the path of being a bad player with a well maintained instrument and unless that is your desire you should drop it and worry about topics that concern playing or tone.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #58
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JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juice Malone ➑️
You are better off not worrying about all this to much. Talking about setups, flatwound strings, and alternate tunings is a waste of time because as of right now you dont even know how to hold a bass. Learn how to play, learn how to coax different tones out of your bass in a variety of ways, learn technique. If you cant do that, you will sound like garbage on any bass.

The above will ony lead you on the path of being a bad player with a well maintained instrument and unless that is your desire you should drop it and worry about topics that concern playing or tone.
Funny you say that because I have had the view of "does all this stuff really matter if I suck?" but peers have told me to get it set up right including the possibility of changing the strings to help playability which would help the learning process. I figured all along to just leave the damn thing alone basically.

So don't worry about action or anything like that? Just curious as other sources have said things like action can definitely affect the learning curve.
Old 7th February 2009 | Show parent
  #59
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeOne3345 ➑️
Funny you say that because I have had the view of "does all this stuff really matter if I suck?" but peers have told me to get it set up right including the possibility of changing the strings to help playability which would help the learning process. I figured all along to just leave the damn thing alone basically.

So don't worry about action or anything like that? Just curious as other sources have said things like action can definitely affect the learning curve.
I'm not trying to say that the ppl who have given you advice are wrong because those statements are true to an extent, its just that most ppl who tell you to invest in all that extra stuff mostly fall into one of two categories: 1. People that cant play because their priorities are in the wrong order and they dont focus enough on playing 2. People that can play well and are in a position where having the right strings or a nice setup will benefit them way more than a begginer. Mostly because they understand how to make their bass sound the way they want.

Have you played your bass yet? Unless it is uncomfortable to play to the point of being painful (excluding the typical awkwardness you will feel in your hands when you start out.), don't worry about it. Learning how to make a less than ideal bass guitar sound good will really benefit you in the long run, the same way learning how to make the best out of a bad situation will help you in life.

It definately helped me out I think. I started off on a terrible Ibanez precision bass with dead no name factory strings. The neck was bowed, action high, the edges of the frets cut into my hands, and the finish on the neck was really sticky. Of course, I had no idea how a nice bass was supposed to feel and nobody told me I needed anything, so I didnt think much of it. I managed to make that bass sound as good as possible (which included bending some strings to play notes in tune) and when I upgraded to a mid level bass that was well put together playing became alot easier and getting a nice tone out of it became easier. That bowed neck and high action ended up making my hands much stronger than the average beginner too.

Plus if you break it down that $50 or so you were planning on using to buy accesories and setups could go towards either a combo amp off ebay, so you can actually hear yourself (you will develop bad habits playing an electric instrument acoustically all the time, when you hear yourself through an amp those bad habits become audible) or one hour of lessons from a great teacher (you'd be surprised how much you can learn from a good teacher in only one hour). Just my opinion.
Old 8th February 2009 | Show parent
  #60
Lives for gear
 
JaeOne3345's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I monitor through an Apogee Duet/Logic/Amplitube.

I totally understand what you mean. Thanks again for your help.

It feels "fine" to me but I have no experience to know what "fine" feels like or know any better, if that makes any sense.
πŸ“ Reply

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