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Editing before mixing
Old 2nd July 2020
  #1
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Editing before mixing

Hi Jens,

Thank you very much for doing this Q and A, I have admired your work for years! I have a few quick questions:

I strongly admire the way you manage to blend orchestral music into metal with bands such as Septicflesh and Fleshgod Apocalypse. Could you share any tips, tricks or general considerations for keeping space and definition in such dense arrangements?

With the heavy amounts of editing involved in most modern metal productions, I'd say editing techniques are a big part of the process of creating polished modern metal mixes. Do you or your employees regularly do editing in projects you receive to mix or will you generally leave the tracks as they are?

Lastly another editing question. When you produce bands, do you often find yourself reaching for editing tools such as beat detective and elastic audio or do you spend a lot of time getting as close to perfect takes as possible with slight manual editing? How do you balance recording and editing throughout a day if you have a band which has traveled to Sweden to record with you and is on the clock so-to-speak?
Old 6th July 2020
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by B36arin ➡️
I strongly admire the way you manage to blend orchestral music into metal with bands such as Septicflesh and Fleshgod Apocalypse. Could you share any tips, tricks or general considerations for keeping space and definition in such dense arrangements?
Cheers man! Yeah, it's really hard. I don't understand why I get to work on the world's most difficult mix projects all the time. :-)

Hard methodical mixing, moving forward fast but in total spending a lot of time on the mixes. Identifying what the core of the song or part is. Automating like crazy. Finding the best compromises ('cause it's all about compromising when mixing projects like that).

I've touched the subject in a previous post, and unfortunately, there are no easy tricks for this. It's about having done it a zillion times that will get you good mixes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by B36arin ➡️
With the heavy amounts of editing involved in most modern metal productions, I'd say editing techniques are a big part of the process of creating polished modern metal mixes. Do you or your employees regularly do editing in projects you receive to mix or will you generally leave the tracks as they are?
Yeah, good question. I must first state that I'm an advocate for "believable" metal productions, where it sounds like someone's actually playing.

That said, it usually needs to sound like very good players for the music to come together, especially if arrangements are dense. So delicate editing is an important part of my mixing. I used to do that myself, but it was killing creativity. Today I have 1 or 2 assistants that are trusted with different tasks. Linus Corneliusson (also an excellent mixer on his own), has worked with me for so long that he thinks like me. Otherwise, I would prefer doing it myself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by B36arin ➡️
Lastly another editing question. When you produce bands, do you often find yourself reaching for editing tools such as beat detective and elastic audio or do you spend a lot of time getting as close to perfect takes as possible with slight manual editing?
More good questions. I spend a lot of time getting the performances right. Sometimes that's easy, and other times, it's hard. Whatever it takes.

I avoid Elastic Audio because of the sound quality, but I do use Beat Detective quite often on drums. If used sensibly, it's actually harder to fail compared to manual editing, and you can quickly try different quantization levels to see what serves the groove the best.

On vocals I do a lot of takes, and I usually comp on my own in down time. I tune when I have to or when I think it becomes better, but I truly hate the sound of vocal tuning. I use AutoTune graphical mode, since I find Melodyne degrading the sound quality too much. But that was a while ago, and people claim it got better, but it still sounds like mp3 to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by B36arin ➡️
How do you balance recording and editing throughout a day if you have a band which has traveled to Sweden to record with you and is on the clock so-to-speak?
This is something most producers struggle with. I have a family and can't stay in the studio all night like I used to do. So I compensate with being more experienced and efficient these days, and I use my assistants where it makes sense. Sometimes I would go home for dinner, stay home, and put the kids to sleep before rocking out another 2-3 hours in the studio. It's the producer schedule that has made me focus a bit more on mixing and mastering than production these days.
Old 6th July 2020
  #3
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Thank you so much for the elaborate answers!
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