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Powering a Studio Down- Quickly
View Poll Results: Is powering a studio on and off with an external "master switch" bad for gear?
It's a very dum thing to do.
2 Votes - 18.18%
Doing this does not hurt gear.
5 Votes - 45.45%
It'll hurt tube gear and nothing else.
0 Votes - 0%
It's bad to turn it all on at once.
4 Votes - 36.36%
It's bad to turn it all off at once
0 Votes - 0%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 11. You may not vote on this poll

Old 12th December 2002
  #1
Lives for gear
 
cashewcupcake's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Lightbulb Powering a Studio Down- Quickly

Hey, I have everything in my studio attached to a "kill switch". I turn everything on and off that way. Here's the circuit : breaker, "kill switch", equitech, gear. I never have any breaker poppage or light dimmage. I think the equitech soaks any surges up.

Will doing this damage my gear? Remember that everything's plugged into an equitech.

I have tube equipment, solid state, synths, a computer, converters.

For fun, I'll make this post a poll too, if you, the reader feel like donating an opinion.
Old 12th December 2002
  #2
Moderator
 
EveAnna Manley's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Presuming your entire electrical kill/on switch circuit is rated for the turn-on surge you should be OK. Also presuming your monitors go off first/come on last or the master volume is *always* down so the amps/speakers aren't amplifying any shutting down/waking up noises...
Old 12th December 2002
  #3
Lives for gear
 
David R.'s Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Very good post. I am wondering the same thing. I power up/down from my UPS.

EvaAnna, how do we know if the power supply is rated for this? Will is say so in the manual or is there something to look for?

Thanks,
Old 12th December 2002
  #4
Moderator
 
EveAnna Manley's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
If you could get an ammeter hooked up to see what your turn on surge actually is and compare that with the ratings for your UPS/Kill/on switch circuit then you would know.

And you need to make sure the whole circuit is rated for the surge. That's the switch, its contacts, your UPS, the breakers, the wire, etc.

If you are not sure, have a qualified professional electrician check this for you. You do not want to do a monkey DIY job when it comes to electrical and risk fire hazards and all that.
Old 12th December 2002
  #5
Lives for gear
 
David R.'s Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Thanks, I learned something new today.

With great power, comes great responsibility...

Old 13th December 2002
  #6
Here for the gear
 
LuvToLaf's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Re: Powering a Studio Down- Quickly

Quote:
Originally posted by faeflora
Hey, I have everything in my studio attached to a "kill switch". I turn everything on and off that way. Here's the circuit : breaker, "kill switch", equitech, gear. I never have any breaker poppage or light dimmage. I think the equitech soaks any surges up.

Will doing this damage my gear? Remember that everything's plugged into an equitech.

I have tube equipment, solid state, synths, a computer, converters.

For fun, I'll make this post a poll too, if you, the reader feel like donating an opinion.
All you have to do is measure your gear fail rate, if you have had no problems, great. We never shut anything down, and have equipment running over 10 years. It isn't so much the surge as it is the heating and cooling of internal chips and components. What do you think kills a light bulb? The surge, or the seal failing?
Just our way, additionally my board is ready when I am.
--LTL
Old 13th December 2002
  #7
Gear Addict
 
🎧 15 years
Where I work we have 3 audio studios and a television studio, each one has it's own main power switch just inside the door. It has been that way for at least the 13 years that I have been here and have never had any problems.

Mind you, it was wired by a professional and as EvAnna said we always make sure the volumes are down when switching on/off.
Old 13th December 2002
  #8
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I have a few switches for everything but I also have lots of gear. I'd at least put the amps/monitors on their own switch just in case.
Old 13th December 2002
  #9
Founder
 
Jules's Avatar
click click click goes off all the outboard.

Computer powered down - hot swap drives removed and put in seperate room / building in case of fire

UPS for computer is switched off

click click click lights go off

Alarm on

Lock up.

Leave
Old 13th December 2002
  #10
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Every studio that I have been involved with the design has had master kill switches as part of the program. Not that it is always followed, but it is always suggested.

FWIW... I usually suggest covered switches that are within about a one or two second run from the mix position that are labeled 1 (monitor shutoff), 2 (console shutoff), 3 (storage device shutoff), 4 (rest of it shutoff)... that way if someone spills a (liquid of choice) here into _______ then there is a definite order to how things are quickly shutoff to minimize damage.

Obviously... if you're dealing with tube amps [or other amplifiers like Bryston's that have a longer shutoff time], then a another switch [preferably that fires a large relay] in front of all the other switches that turns off the runs between the output of the power amps and the input to the speakers [the reason for the relays is to keep the runs from the amps to the speakers as short as possible] is often in order.

Few people ever follow this advice, but it's never my job to insist, only suggest.

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