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Mixing order / workflow (i.e. vocal first, rhythm first, neither!)
Old 2nd June 2020
  #1
Gear Nut
 
Mixing order / workflow (i.e. vocal first, rhythm first, neither!)

Hey John!

First of all, thank you so much for doing this and so generously sharing your expertise with all of us. It's really appreciated!

I'm curious if you have a typical workflow when you're starting on a mix. Do you usually work on the various elements in a particular order (i.e. drums first, bass second, vocals third, synths and guitars fourth, etc.)? If so, in your mind, what are the virtues of going in that order? How much and/or often does that order vary?

Thanks again!
Old 16th June 2020
  #2
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TheHanes's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaleida ➡️
Hey John!

First of all, thank you so much for doing this and so generously sharing your expertise with all of us. It's really appreciated!

I'm curious if you have a typical workflow when you're starting on a mix. Do you usually work on the various elements in a particular order (i.e. drums first, bass second, vocals third, synths and guitars fourth, etc.)? If so, in your mind, what are the virtues of going in that order? How much and/or often does that order vary?

Thanks again!
I'll usually start with the whole song playing, listening down and making bigger volume moves as I learn the song. When I've got a pretty good feel, I'll turn everything off and start unmuting in the order from top to bottom of how I arrange the tracks. Drums, Percussion, FX, Bass, Guitars, Keys, etc. . . . BGV, Lead Vocals.

I'll generally do this adding each instrument as I go, i.e. not turning off drums when I start opening up percussion.

Of course I'll solo certain things to hear and work on specific issues.

When I've gone through everything like this and the whole song is open again, I'll then usually do my vocal editing; soloing vocals and cleaning them up.

Finally after that, I'll tend to leave everything on as I do the meat of the mixing; still solo'ing to nail down specific parts of course.

I think that this method lets me really learn the parts while spending the most time hearing drums and hearing where vocals relate to everything, which are often the key elements needing attention.

I guess I stick to this pretty regularly; but if something else catches my attention while I'm in the process, I'll go in and put that work in on that part as needed.
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