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Got myself a car
Old 12th March 2014
  #1
Gear Nut
 
brainspin's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Got myself a car

to destroy.


My dad's friend has a junkyard and is gonna save a relatively intact car for me to


Question is: how should I destroy it and how should I record said destruction?



My dad owns a Bobcat (a mini bulldozer) which I'm going to use to aid in my simulated car crash. I'm going to tie a rope around an old cast-iron wood stove, put it in the bucket of the Bobcat, lift it as high as I can over the car, turn the Bobcat off (the bucket will stay up), and have two friends pull the rope, thereby sending the 300+ lbs of metal onto the roof of the car. I'll then repeat the process, but dropping it on the hood instead.

First things first, thoughts on that strategy? Good idea, bad idea? Alternatives?

Also, how do you think I should best record this? I have a SD 702, but I'm going to be upgrading to a 744 before this takes place. I currently have a Rode NTG-3, a pair of CM3s, and an SM57. I'll likely have some more mics in my collection by the time this takes place (I've got another two months or so).

I'm thinking maybe the NTG-3 about 5 feet from the impact spot, the SM57 closer, maybe 2 feet and from a different angle, and the CM3s 10 feet in ORTF. This is my first time recording such an orchestrated event and with multiple mics at once, so let me know if any of this sounds stupid. Also, I know it's hard to advise without physically being there, but I'm sure some of you have experience recording similar things.

Something I think could be cool would be putting an omni lav somewhere inside the car.



So anyway, once I drop the stove, I'll proceed with the standard sledgehammer/crowbar/axe treatment. Any cool tips regarding that? I read Ric Viers entry about junkyard recordings in the Sound Effects Bible which has been a great help, but I'm curious about other people's opinions.


Also, this is going to be happening in northern Connecticut, so if anyone is interested in joining and adding some mics/expertise to the mix, feel free to pm me.

thanks
Old 13th March 2014
  #2
Gear Guru
 
charles maynes's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by brainspin ➑️
to destroy.


My dad's friend has a junkyard and is gonna save a relatively intact car for me to


Question is: how should I destroy it and how should I record said destruction?



My dad owns a Bobcat (a mini bulldozer) which I'm going to use to aid in my simulated car crash. I'm going to tie a rope around an old cast-iron wood stove, put it in the bucket of the Bobcat, lift it as high as I can over the car, turn the Bobcat off (the bucket will stay up), and have two friends pull the rope, thereby sending the 300+ lbs of metal onto the roof of the car. I'll then repeat the process, but dropping it on the hood instead.

First things first, thoughts on that strategy? Good idea, bad idea? Alternatives?

Also, how do you think I should best record this? I have a SD 702, but I'm going to be upgrading to a 744 before this takes place. I currently have a Rode NTG-3, a pair of CM3s, and an SM57. I'll likely have some more mics in my collection by the time this takes place (I've got another two months or so).

I'm thinking maybe the NTG-3 about 5 feet from the impact spot, the SM57 closer, maybe 2 feet and from a different angle, and the CM3s 10 feet in ORTF. This is my first time recording such an orchestrated event and with multiple mics at once, so let me know if any of this sounds stupid. Also, I know it's hard to advise without physically being there, but I'm sure some of you have experience recording similar things.

Something I think could be cool would be putting an omni lav somewhere inside the car.



So anyway, once I drop the stove, I'll proceed with the standard sledgehammer/crowbar/axe treatment. Any cool tips regarding that? I read Ric Viers entry about junkyard recordings in the Sound Effects Bible which has been a great help, but I'm curious about other people's opinions.


Also, this is going to be happening in northern Connecticut, so if anyone is interested in joining and adding some mics/expertise to the mix, feel free to pm me.

thanks
putting a mic within 2 feet of where a cast iron stove is going to impact is a recipe for destroying the mic... you might consider putting it inside the vehicle near where the stove will impact- also be careful to not distort your preamps-
Old 13th March 2014 | Show parent
  #3
Gear Nut
 
brainspin's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by charles maynes ➑️
putting a mic within 2 feet of where a cast iron stove is going to impact is a recipe for destroying the mic... you might consider putting it inside the vehicle near where the stove will impact- also be careful to not distort your preamps-
Forgot to mention I'd have someone holding that mic with a boom. I want at least one mic as close as possible to get the sharp, metal impact.

Maybe I'll try to get an omni inside on a mini tripod rather than a lav. I'm just worried about the possibility of the roof completely caving in and destroying any mics in there.

And yeah, I'm going to have mic pads on all the inputs and use sledgehammer impacts for testing the levels.
Old 13th March 2014
  #4
Lives for gear
 
adrianww's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Coming at this purely from a sound design sort of angle (and assuming that what you want to get out of this is your own little library of "car smash-age" sound FX) I'd suggest recording someone breaking one or two of the windows first (if any of them are intact). You never know when you might need "someone breaking into a car through the window, version 1" and it will be tricky to get that once you've dropped a stove on it.

Thinking along the same lines, would there be any way to swing the stove at high speed into the front of the car? I'd guess that would be more likely to sound like a car actually hitting something while travelling. Unless what you really want is "car getting squished, version 1" in which case it sounds like you've got that covered...

Anyway, have fun!
Old 13th March 2014 | Show parent
  #5
Gear Nut
 
brainspin's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrianww ➑️
Coming at this purely from a sound design sort of angle (and assuming that what you want to get out of this is your own little library of "car smash-age" sound FX) I'd suggest recording someone breaking one or two of the windows first (if any of them are intact). You never know when you might need "someone breaking into a car through the window, version 1" and it will be tricky to get that once you've dropped a stove on it.

Thinking along the same lines, would there be any way to swing the stove at high speed into the front of the car? I'd guess that would be more likely to sound like a car actually hitting something while travelling. Unless what you really want is "car getting squished, version 1" in which case it sounds like you've got that covered...

Anyway, have fun!
Good call on the windows. I do want to leave at least one intact so I get the sound of them buckling under pressure rather than being hit directly.

As far as swinging into the bumper, I've thought about that, but I can't think of a feasible way of doing that without a crane. I haven't actually been to the junkyard yet, so when I go to check it out, I'll see if there's any way of swinging something, because you're right, that could create a much better crash sound.
Old 13th March 2014
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Bill@AudioVision's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Don't forget to set the sample rate to highest possible setting.
Old 15th March 2014
  #7
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
and please by all means Video this if you can .. great opportunity ... cheers john
Old 19th March 2014
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Oh yeah - I'd like to see some video of this! :-) And the omni-lav inside the car is a pretty good idea too. I would also place some contact mic's around the car to get some transducer stuff which might be useful in the low end, preferably at places that won't get a direct hit but are decently connected to areas that will, e.g. at the roof right over the rear window when you drop the stove on it etc. Boy this sounds like fun! Enjoy!
Old 20th March 2014
  #9
Deleted 2d58179
Guest
Make sure your guys have really long booms for that dropping situation.

They won't be incredibly mobile in that situation and you don't want that stove near anyone's feet. Also, shrapnel.

an alternative to booming would be to mount the CM3s or NTG3 to hang from the underside of the bobcat bucket. They wouldn't be in any danger there, and would have an excellent angle on the action.

Bring safety and destructive gear:
goggles
gloves
sledgehammer
pickaxe

also

water
snacks
first aid kit
Old 21st March 2014 | Show parent
  #10
Gear Addict
 
Hxd Ped's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] ➑️
Don't forget to set the sample rate to highest possible setting.
Agreed. This is definitely a high sample rate situation.
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