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Frequency blending rhythm and lead guitars?
Old 16th September 2012
  #1
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Frequency blending rhythm and lead guitars?

Hi all

I've been writing alot of rock/grundge lately (think 90's Foo Fighters)
Alot of my songs involve a basic picking riff on guitar 1 and a rock chord on guitar 2 , both from electric guitars and both overdriven.
I'm going to start experimenting with recording.
I'm not sure how I should assign the frequencies of the 2 guitars.
Meaning, should the rhythm be lower frequency than the riff, or the other way round? My instinct tells me the rock chord should pack the lower punch, but I was wondering if there was a rule of thumb?
I play the heavy rock chords on a Les Paul, and the other guitarist plays the picking riffs on a Stratocaster.
Another question, should we blend the frequencies before or after recording?
Here's what my gut tells me.
The Strat is alot more twangy than the LP, and so long as the amp settings are similar then they should sit together in the mix quite well.
If there are any clashes, make small adjustments after recording.
This is the gear we are going to be working with.

Gibson Les Paul
Fender Stratocaster
Boss CS-2
Boss DS-1
Orange Tiny Terror
Shure SM57

Any advice appreciated, on topic or not.
Cubase 6
Old 16th September 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
I'd assume you'd be playing power chords, mainly on the lower frets, and have the picking on the higher strings, higher up the fret board. They're higher notes, so naturally they have higher fundamental frequencies. It shouldn't be too difficult to pick out one over the other. If you do have some difficulty, EQ will help you out a bit. Also make use of things like reverbs and delays to make one seem further back in the mix, and one further forward. The contrast of having one wet track and one dry track will help the ear pick them both out separately. It's probably a better idea to apply that kind of processing to the picking though. Also, you could make use of panning. Have the rhythm guitar on the left, and the lead on the right. Do whatever you've got to do to make it work.

Also, the 2 separate guitars can be an advantage. The Strat does have a more twangy tone than the LP, but don't get restricted by thinking you have to have similar amp settings. If you've got 2 different tones, with 2 different guitars, 2 different amps, with completely different settings, and they work well together... **** it, you're done, go record. There's no rule that says the lead and rhythm have to sound alike. The fun in recording is to be had with the experimentation. Go nuts with it. If you have fun, you'll get good results.
Old 15th November 2012 | Show parent
  #3
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikebailey92 ➡️
I'd assume you'd be playing power chords, mainly on the lower frets, and have the picking on the higher strings, higher up the fret board. They're higher notes, so naturally they have higher fundamental frequencies. It shouldn't be too difficult to pick out one over the other. If you do have some difficulty, EQ will help you out a bit. Also make use of things like reverbs and delays to make one seem further back in the mix, and one further forward. The contrast of having one wet track and one dry track will help the ear pick them both out separately. It's probably a better idea to apply that kind of processing to the picking though. Also, you could make use of panning. Have the rhythm guitar on the left, and the lead on the right. Do whatever you've got to do to make it work.

Also, the 2 separate guitars can be an advantage. The Strat does have a more twangy tone than the LP, but don't get restricted by thinking you have to have similar amp settings. If you've got 2 different tones, with 2 different guitars, 2 different amps, with completely different settings, and they work well together... **** it, you're done, go record. There's no rule that says the lead and rhythm have to sound alike. The fun in recording is to be had with the experimentation. Go nuts with it. If you have fun, you'll get good results.
Hey Mike. Sorry to dig up an old thread.
Thanks for the advice, actually only just getting around to recording this weekend but the Strat is now out of the picture so I'll be recording all guitar parts with a Les Paul.
However I have a Boss overdrive pedal coming in the post.
I was thinking of playing the higher notes on bridge pickup through the overdrive pedal and the power chords on both pickups through the distortion pedal.
Hopefully this will give very distinct tracks.
I'm worried that the finished mix might be too gainy so I am prepared to back off the distortion until it sounds good.
Should I leave a gap between the 2 guitar parts for vocals, or should they go somewhere else?
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