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Music Production for dummies
Old 12th September 2012
  #1
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Music Production for dummies

What would be the ideal way to study music production?

Books?... Internet?... Other Producers?... Experiaced Producers?...

What would you suggest for someone whos just starting from scratch?
Old 12th September 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
ksandvik's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Computer Magazine has lots of good introduction articles. Otherwise it's just a matter of clocking 1000+ hours in the studio and have a critical ear.
Old 23rd December 2012
  #3
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Listen to as much music as you can of all styles, read/watch as much on the topic as possible (loads of videos on YouTube, this site, sound on sound etc) and most of all, experiment with stuff you've learnt from all of the above and have fun!
Old 23rd December 2012
  #4
Founder
 
Jules's Avatar
Search around on this forum (use keywords and phrases) and buy some books also.
Old 28th December 2012
  #5
Gear Nut
 
waveheavy's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Yeah, do a search here on gearslutz. Should be some good book recommendations here on the forum.

If you're in a hurry, I recommend Berklee School of Music's online course Critical Listening. It will get you up to speed in a hurry about what to listen for, music genres, acoustics, etc.
Old 28th December 2012 | Show parent
  #6
Lives for gear
 
skillz335's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksandvik ➑️
Computer Magazine has lots of good introduction articles. Otherwise it's just a matter of clocking 1000+ hours in the studio and have a critical ear.
lol, ive clocked that many hours at least and have a critical ear, but I think Im missing technical aptitude.

really it is a matter of putting the time in, practice makes perfect. also if your a hands on type of person, I would check with the colleges you have around. Some offer clinics, shops, and 3 to 4 week coarses that are audio related. most are reasonably priced and worth the time. I believe there is something for every level of experience as well, at least around where I live. So it cant hurt to check.
Old 28th December 2012
  #7
Lives for gear
 
JC Biffro's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
YouTube and Groove3 are the 2 best sources of my learning material. Latch onto a particular area you want to improve upon/know about (i.e. Compression, EQ, Theory, Chords etc) and YouTube to your hearts content.

From watching videos, you then pick up on common VST/VSTi's and Groove3 9 times out of 10 will have an indepth tutorial for that particular VST/VSTi.
Old 28th December 2012
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
AndreBenoit's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Sonic Academy http://www.sonicacademy.com is well worth the subscription fee of you're looking to produce under the broad "EDM" umbrella. They're all Irish though so if you struggle with accents have a look at their taster videos first to make sure you understand them!
If you are UK based then I studied under Christophe Bride at Manchester Midischool & it's a fantastic course to get on, they are expanding with online courses at the moment that are also well worth the money http://www.midischool.com

Andre
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