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Delay/Reverb vs Reverb/Delay
Old 8th September 2012
  #1
Gear Head
 
Plasticine's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Delay/Reverb vs Reverb/Delay

Hi guys,

I wanted to ask you some questions about the use of Delay and Reverb.

1)Do you currently insert the Reverb before the Delay in the signal processing of a vocal track?

It seems in the 50's/60's, they used to insert Delay before Reverb, didn't they?!

2) Do you use a bit of reverb (<30ms) on every tracks of your mix to glue them together?

Your help is much appreciated!

Pier
Old 8th September 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Tinderwet's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
I rarely insert them, I usually use them on separate aux sends, except when I use the delay as a pre-delay to delay the sound of the plate/spring reverb, or if I want the unique sound of the reverbed delay. I believe that's what they usually did in the 50s, 60s and later on too.

I don't use reverb on every track, sometimes I don't use it on anything, and I never use them on bass or kick drum (never say never; it can happen if I want it as a very distinct effect, but only for a few notes or a bar).
Old 8th September 2012
  #3
Lives for gear
 
RusRant's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
The track dictates this, but generally you wouldn't really use reverb on everything. It depends also, if you want to predelay your verb, or have the verb in the repeats for more of an effect. My general rule with reverb is you should feel it, not hear it. Bring up your aux send until you start to hear the reverb, than back off a few db. Unless your going for the big 80's ballad thing, reverb needs to be kept in check or the mix will get washy. Keep in mind also, that reverb creates the illusion of distance. Generally I like just delay or a detuned delay on vocals and leave the reverb for other things.
Old 8th September 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
The Elf's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I wouldn't have delays or reverbs on inserts. I like having them on FX sends to let me share them.

I frequently send my delays to my reverbs, but I can't see much reason for doing it the other way round.

As to use... it's really about knowing *why* you're adding reverb. I would no more add reverb to everything in a mix than I would add to salt to every meal.

Sometimes a reverb is there to add depth/distance; sometimes it is there to pull a sound forward (like using a drop-shadow on text), push a sound away, draw attention, add size/space, or to add sustain.

Just putting reverb on everything as a technical concept of 'glue-ing' is misguided IMO. Listen to your mix and respond to what it asks you to do - that's how a good mix comes about. Your ears *know* what a good mix sounds like, so trust what they tell you. If a sound is good dry then leave it dry; if it needs reverb then give it reverb - and if you can remove an effect/process without it audibly affecting the mix, then remove it.
Old 8th September 2012
  #5
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
In the days before all this digital coolness, they used to insert a delay on the reverb send to give the reverb more character (pre-delay). Today you have most of those options included in 99 % of the reverb plugins out there, so you really don't have to bother with it. You should use an aux send/track for reverb and delay.
Old 10th September 2012
  #6
Gear Head
 
Plasticine's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Thanks a lot, I am gonna follow your advices!
Old 10th September 2012
  #7
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
One thing about the pre-delay: If you can, use a tape predelay to chop off some of the highs of the transients before it hit the reverb. Human ear tells to our brain that softer, mellow sounds (with less highs) come from a distant place. Also, I suggest using a medium, or sometimes longer predelay (depending on the rythm). Why, first a reverb will always messed up the phase when combined with the source signal. Secondly, along with a good decay adjustments, it helps create space in your mix, without washing it in a soup of reverb. That's why I generally use a somewhat short decay too.
Finally, a good trick I can give you, is to put some modulation effect (lfo) before the verb. It's sometimes comes with delay plugs. Modulation will catch your ears, making you more sensitive to the verb. In doing so, it allows you to put your reverb fader much lower, 'cause the ear notice it easily and make you avoid to put your verb to high....what can messed up the clarity of your mix.

Now, have fun.
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