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Double tracking guitars
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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mr. torture's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Double tracking guitars

Is it better to use different amps when double tracking guitars? Or is it perfectly acceptable to use the same amp/guitar combo? I would expect different sounding amps would give more stereo spread, but was just wondering if it's necessary?
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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Owen L T's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Depends what you want them to sound like: a wide version of one guitar, or distinct left and right guitars. Best way to hear the difference is to do it both ways: record left channel; record right channel with same setup; record right channel with different setup; A/B the stereo sound by switching out the right channel.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #3
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mr. torture's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen L T ➡️
Depends what you want them to sound like: a wide version of one guitar, or distinct left and right guitars. Best way to hear the difference is to do it both ways: record left channel; record right channel with same setup; record right channel with different setup; A/B the stereo sound by switching out the right channel.
That's probably the best approach. I only own one amp, but could probably swing something to try for a quick session / experiment.

Thanks!
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
I know this is going to sound like one of those "it's not the gear, it's the song" posts, but... a lot of it is about the playing. If you want it to sound like "one big wide guitar" you play it so you can repeat it exactly. If you want it to sound more jangly/12-string-y, you play it a little looser, but it's gotta be the right degree of loose. Playing a guitar part so it's the right kind of double-able and also musical isn't easy.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #5
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mr. torture's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn ➡️
I know this is going to sound like one of those "it's not the gear, it's the song" posts, but... a lot of it is about the playing. If you want it to sound like "one big wide guitar" you play it so you can repeat it exactly. If you want it to sound more jangly/12-string-y, you play it a little looser, but it's gotta be the right degree of loose. Playing a guitar part so it's the right kind of double-able and also musical isn't easy.
Very good points, thank you!
Old 1 week ago
  #6
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🎧 10 years
nothing wrong with using the same amp twice. try it and see if you like the sound. you can also use the same amp but a different guitar. or you could do one take with an sm57 and an md421 on the speaker and then pan the different mics left-right.

there aren't any rules regarding this. if you have the equipment available, do a quick take and see what sound you get.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
A couple more options to differentiate more or less for effect. Tuning - a bit of subtle detune between takes makes the multitracking more obvious. Amp tone changes - if you do one take slightly scooped and the next with a bit of a mid peak that will differentiate. Mic placement, tracking one closer to the centre of the cone and the next nearer the edge will give two different tones to blend, or on different speakers in a cab. You get the idea.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
The other thing to consider, looping back to the OP, is whether "stereo spread" should really matter. Or is it just the texture of the thing? if it's just texture you're after, that's gotta work in mono. I'm saying that as a person who thinks that stereo spreads of single sources are usually pretty dumb.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
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guavadude's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I do a LOT of double tracking and have tried most everything. Changing amps is cool but not very convenient. Changing mics doesn’t seem to make as much of a difference as changing guitars since that will give you tuning variations.

If you only have one guitar and one amp, change where you play the part on the neck and change pickups. Change the pedal you’re using or you can Eq each side differently. Lots of ways to do it and they all sound a little different. It doesn’t take much of a difference to sound better than playing it exactly the same twice.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
And change where the accents are. That'll create l/r movement.
Old 1 week ago
  #11
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Sharp11's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Also, playing the second part with different chord voicings, or even just playing the extensions as triads (I.e., a C major triad over an F maj 7th) can give you some really interesting aural candy.

Also, adding an effect on the double is cool, I recently played two identical left and right parts, but recorded the right channel with a flanger pedal - the difference in the dry and wet tracks made it super wide.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
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Al Rogers's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Here's something to try. Double track a guitar part. Pan the tracks hard left and hard right. Then when you mix leave one side dry and make the other side very wet.

Here's an example. When I produced this arranging demo back in the late 1970s we double tracked the lead guitar through a tube DI and mixed it is as I suggested above.
Attached Files

bud reggai demo.mp3 (661.8 KB, 20 views)

Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #13
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nightchef's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Rogers ➡️
Here's something to try. Double track a guitar part. Pan the tracks hard left and hard right. Then when you mix leave one side dry and make the other side very wet.
Another strategy that’s sort of a first cousin to this one is to play one track tight and crisp, with a lot of muting and strong accents, and the other a bit looser and smoother, letting things ring. You can hear a lot of that kind of contrast in the early Beatles’ guitar arrangements.
Old 2 days ago
  #14
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BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
Double tracking Guitars -common practice in real studios.

1. play the second take as a seperate event.
2. change the Amp if desired.
3. change the Guitar if possible.
4. use different pickup position if Same Guitar is used on both tracks.
5. Change the Microphone if you really want a Different sound, but moves 2,3 and 4 often make 5 unnecessary.

if you only have 1 amp, then Just do 1, 3, 4 and 5.

thats all standard technique for Rock especially.

Buddha
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