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My Recording Connection review/ experience (Audio Engineering course)
Old 27th April 2015
  #1
Here for the gear
 
KidsOfThe90s's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
My Recording Connection review/ experience (Audio Engineering course)

Ok so I'm not 100% this is the right place to post this, I'm only posting this here because this is the second place I've ever read a Recording Connection thread, and I feel after they updated their services, we need to keep the reviews up to date lol.

So the main reason I'm making this is because I had just finished the Audio Engineering course (three weeks ago), and I just got off of the phone with a worker there, and I just got the greatest news possible! :D

Ok so we'll start this wonderful story of where it all began back in January. I had heard about the program through a family member who wanted to help me out in searching for colleges, and programs that would help me get certified to be an audio engineer. I had called them early January, and honestly that first month I called them was the most interested they've ever been in me throughout the whole time I've been with them, even when I was enrolled. I remember them telling me I would get a bachelors degree equivalent at the end, and a lot of other things he told me, but more specifically throughout the whole 30 minute long conversation of the guy telling me information I had already heard from another worker, or looked up, and me only replying mhmm, and waiting for him to finish, the one thing that basically made me sign up was what he had sad about what we would be doing for the final exam. I REMEMBER exactly him telling me that for the final exam I would get to record a project, either I can record it, or I could bring in a band, and they would teach me how to pitch it to labels, and basically promote it. They basically said they would give me connections, and make promoting the project easy.
I was extremely excited by this, and like a fool I decided I was in! He had set up, and coached me for an interview with a studio owner who had ran a studio an hour away from me.

The Next Week I had went to the interview, and I honestly think I nailed it! I told the studio owner, soon to be my mentor, my ambitions, what I had knew about mixing etc, and my experience. He showed me around the studio, and told me about his previous students, and how he stays in contact with them, and has even given some of his good students equipment. At the end we set a date to start the course.

Ok so I was in the 5 month program for a total for 3 months, and I'll get to why I finished 2 months earlier in a minute. The first day basically was me cleaning up the studio, sweeping the floors, and taking out the trash. Being a sheep, and new to actually being in a professional studio, I was actually happy to be there cleaning lol, and I didn't think it was going to last long. Boooooy was I wrong!
I pretty much cleaned up the studio for 8/10 of the course, and actually learned for about a total of 2 days, and then my mentor had basically stopped, and let another guy who rarely ever showed up mentor me. Anyhow the first day of learning with my mentor was the day I actually learned the most pretty much, because that was the only day were my mentor had bought out his book that he had made to teach the students since he said the RRF program is "shit", and doesn't really teach you anything. That was the last day I ever saw that book, I guess he gave up after that. For the rest of the time I was learning under him he basically always showed up late, and spent most of his time going to the store to get food, and eating it while I waited. Like I said after the first day he basically stopped teaching me, and even though I feel like his method for the other 4 days was great, at the same time I feel like it wasn't a good way of helping. For the other 4 days he just sat and ate, and pretended to be a student, and made me teach him what the text book had taught me. Like I said I sort of feel like this is kind of a good way, because it makes you realize how little you actually know, but it's also a horrible way because I could actually be learning instead of realizing I'm not the most knowledgable for a whole class. As soon as I got to the lesson about mic placement, he decided to not mentor me anymore, and let another one of his workers handle it from there. I don't really have much bad to say about the second guy, it was just at least the first mentor helped me learn whilst the second guy just read word from word what it says in the text book, I felt there was no need in driving an hour long drive just to read the textbook which I could have read at home. Eventually contact with the first mentor had stopped for a while, and he just sent me to the studio of another one of his students where I had to teach the student basic things like EQing etc.
Anyway I finished the course two months early because everything were teaching was either basic or common sense, the text book didn't teach me anything, and if I learned anything from the course it was because I googled it, honestly compression was the only thing I slightly learned from the course, and I learned that because of an image i found, not anything a mentor told me (I wasn't to sure about compression, but I saw an image that basically described it, and it all came to me.) After I stopped meeting with the second guy meetings in the studio pretty much became meaningless. The day I was scheduled to record a session for them my mentor, and another worker spent the whole day talking about transexuals, instead of teaching me how I would setup their equipment to record the session.

Anyhow skip a few, three weeks ago I was on the final exam, and I had went to the studio so the mentor can help me with it as stated by the textbook. However when I got there I basically spent the whole day putting up wires, and figuring out how to work a vst for the mentor... Yes you heard that right, we spent NEARLY 5 HOURS FIGURING OUT HOW TO WORK A VST WHEN I HAD A FINAL EXAM TO TAKE. At the end of the day I just left, and took the exam at home, and passed it. After the figured out I passed it, the mentor asked me to send it, and I lost contact with him that point after. I tried to call to see if I needed to go in anymore, and another worker told me that my mentor would call back, but never did of course. So much for keeping contact with students,.

Boring right? Now here's where it gets interesting.

So as soon as I was done with the course it was time to look for jobs, and I remember also when I signed up for the course they mentioned job placement. I looked on their site, and the job board didn't work at all, so I called them to ask about it. I called, and they had told me the website hasn't been updated since about 2012, and I would need to speak to my career councilor if I needed to find jobs. It literally took me a whole week to contact him. I contact him the day I finished, and waited. I had only left two voicemails, until calling again that saturday. The person who picked up the phone told me that he wasn't in on saturdays, and I could leave another voice mail if I wanted. I replied "No thanks I already left one" and he replied "when today?" Which is when I told him that I had called at the beginning of the week, and no one ever called back. He sounded surprised to hear this, and told me I should leave another voicemail just to bug him, and make sure he calls back. I decided he was right, and if I wanted to speak to them I would have to be persistent, I planned on leaving a ton of voicemails next week so I could finally get a call lol.
So I started on Monday, and to my surprise the counselor actually was there, and picked up. We had talked for a little bit, and he said to get started I would have to make a resume, so using the template he supplied I made a resume. on THE SAME DAY, three days later after finally getting in contact with him, he had told me the one I made was great, but I just needed to take off the skills part, and somehow add those to my experience. I FINISHED THAT WEDNESDAY. It took me until Friday to get in contact with him again, and he talked to me about the resume I made, which basically was the same one as the first one, except the skills were transferred to the experience section. He basically told me to redo the whole resume, since it seemed like something he wrote on the example resume, it wasn't but I was ok from starting on scratch, my only problem was now I'd have to wait until monday to continue.


WHICH BRINGS US TOOOOO TODAY! :D

Today I called him about the resume he made me redo because it seemed like something he made, simply because I used the same format. I had a new resume, new words this time, and I honestly felt like my resume was me 100%. Long story short, he just told me to redo the whole resume over again from scratch because I'm still using words he used. He gave me an explanation on how people looking at my resume are going to see familiar words, and throw it away. I tried my hardest to explain to him, that I put in my experience, and everything that's on that resume may have used similar words, but that's because some of the words in the example resume, are words that would have came out of my mouth. After that I pretty much left him speechless when I told him that I don't feel like people searching for workers wouldn't discredit me just because they see similar words, and would look towards the experience more, after I said that he tried to throw me down saying I didn't know anything about the mics I had posted, and I basically copy and pasted the same mics he had. He then proceeded to question me on the AKG 414, and I feel like I owned him I told him more than even he knew about the AKG 414, I told him all about the multi-polar pattern capabilities, and everything which left him speechless. I'm really sorry that I also happen to know the mics you wrote on the example. Anyhow I just gave in, and decided to re-write the resume. Like I said earlier, it didn't make me angry that I had to re-write the resume, it just aggravated me knowing after I finish it I'm going to have to wait three more days to move to the next step, this time I kind of called him out for that and asked if he could just send out or do something with the resume I had sent him so I wouldn't have to wait another week before moving on to the next step, and he told me no, and said as soon as I'm done with this one I can call him instantly... Lets see if that'll happen...

So lastly the great news I had heard was at the end of the phone call where I had remembered about the first guy I had spoken to telling me about the final project, and how I would have to record a full project, and they would help pitch it to labels. The guy on the phone replied that that's for the masters program that I wasn't even eligible to take, and that no one should have ever told me about that.... So basically I just realized this whole experience was a waste of my life, they lied to me, I didn't learn anything, and the job placement is doing nothing for me, and I don't know I think I screwed myself by telling the guy on the phone about it. He asked me a ton of questions about when I was told that, and by who, and I think he tried to go into the system, and delete the recorded call, since they record all calls.

Is there anyway I can sue them for fraud since they did lie to me on every aspect even down to the degree which I'm realizing isn't a degree or even equal to one, it's just a certificate of completing their course.

Sorry this is such a long read, if you can just skip to the end, I really need help on this one haha. Thank you!
Old 27th April 2015
  #2
Here for the gear
 
KidsOfThe90s's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Just skip to the end if it's too much to read lol, really need help on this one.
Old 8th June 2015
  #3
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KidsOfThe90s's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Went down just how I said... They deleted the phone call, thus no evidence... I guess there's nothing I can do now other than make sure nobody I know EVER touches their program. They're just a bunch of liars who want your money.
Old 8th June 2015 | Show parent
  #4
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidsOfThe90s ➡️
Just skip to the end if it's too much to read lol, really need help on this one.
can I sue you for the last 10 mins of my life back?

and for falsifying a public post on a forum . I waited for the good news that never came
Old 9th June 2015
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
dheming's Avatar
Wow this sounds like a total cluster fuqk. How much did you pay for this "program" you took?
Old 3rd May 2016
  #6
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
similar experience

Something similar happened to me last year. I took the program 3 months too, and exactly the same thing were happening. I was pretty much paying them to work for them. I quit this program when they accidentally sent me an e-mail with all their conversations talking about me. They knew I wanted to quit and so they were trying to get me to finish one more lesson so I couldn't drop my self from the course, they also said I was being a pain.

I'm still trying to figure out how to sue them so I can get my money back since they don't wanna give it to me.

I really wouldn't recommend this program to anyone. I'm really sure it's a total scam.
Old 4th May 2016 | Show parent
  #7
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by doulos30 ➡️
can I sue you for the last 10 mins of my life back?
well over 2,000 words!
talk about tl;dr!
Old 4th May 2016 | Show parent
  #8
Lives for gear
 
TREMORS's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by cduran18 ➡️
Something similar happened to me last year. I took the program 3 months too, and exactly the same thing were happening. I was pretty much paying them to work for them. I quit this program when they accidentally sent me an e-mail with all their conversations talking about me. They knew I wanted to quit and so they were trying to get me to finish one more lesson so I couldn't drop my self from the course, they also said I was being a pain.

I'm still trying to figure out how to sue them so I can get my money back since they don't wanna give it to me.

I really wouldn't recommend this program to anyone. I'm really sure it's a total scam.
There have been a few threads about this and the overwhelming sense of this program isnt very positive.
TL; DR or not they advertise on Gearslutz.
Not a good look imho unless im missing the positive threads
Old 8th May 2016
  #9
Gear Addict
 
BazzBass's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
firstly,if you did any research you'd know nearly all Audio Engineering courses are a ripoff. Secondly nearly all of them offer to let you record a band as part of the course. If you have proof that they promised a recording session then go to consumer affairs.

From your first few sentences I knew how it would end,so should have you.
Old 1st September 2016
  #10
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
all the reviews seem pretty terrible, why is Pensado's Place supporting this?
Old 10th December 2016
  #11
Here for the gear
 
Scam: noun. 1. a confidence game or other fraudulent scheme, especially for making a quick profit; swindle.

Google "Recording Connection Accreditation". You will see bogus accrediting acronyms like NPSAA and USBAS. Do some research on these and you will find that they are just websites probably created by the Recording Connection. Try to find any information about the NPSAA. The USBAS can be found but it is some crappy website and when you call the phone number listed it goes straight to voicemail. You will never get through or get a reply. I tried. I also called the U.S Dept. Of Education which oversees these accrediting bodies and they had never heard of the NPSAA or the USBAS. Do the research.

Also, Google "Recording Connection Catalog" and follow the link. Page 42 states that: "This institution is a private institution approved to operate by the California Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education." Yet when you call the California BPPE or search on their website for approved schools, Recording Connection is shown as an unapproved school that has never been approved and actually has multiple citations issued against them over the last 3 years.

These guys could easily just advertise themselves as a recording studio lesson broker, yet they go out of their way to advertise false and misleading information in order to present themselves as a legitimate accredited and state approved school in order to make money. That my friends is called a scam!
Old 12th December 2016
  #12
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Private trade schools have ripped off huge numbers of people, and it seems like you are one of them. Sounds like you went to Trump University for sound engineer training. I just finished a semester long audio engineering class at a local community college. Cost about $250. We met 5 hours a week. And got a good introduction to the field. Didn't get as much hands-on time as I would like, but we did all get a chance to learn pro-tools, produce and record 3 or 4 in-house projects, record 3 concerts put on by other student groups, set up and use 7 or 8 different mics, work with the gobos, professional effects equipment, preamps, midis, patch panels, etc.... No one promised us employment, but we all learned a lot.
Old 13th December 2016
  #13
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Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
for anyone in this boat like the OP... the first thing you do is contact your district attorney's office to file a formal complaint. If the DA gets enough complaints then the school can be investigated and charges can be brought against them.

Contacting the BBB is also a good idea and file a complaint with them too...they can't do much but it is a record of your complaint.

If the DA or the BBB has a lot of complaints, you could also talk to a lawyer about filing a class action suit on behalf of you and all the other students who have been ripped off.

And to those looking at programs for sound engineering... do not take the salesperson/recruiter's word for it. As to get a log in as a prospective student and see what the job board looks like. See what the curriculum looks like, meet with the teacher first before you pay, tour the facilities, ask to talk to former graduates.

Here's a big one... as what the placement rate is after graduation... as for the rate after 1 year and as for the rate after 5 years. Look for alumni online to corroborate those numbers.

Just really ask lot of questions and be a huge PITA before you sign up... that will start to show you what kind of institution it is. It may not tell you everything but at least it's a start and can give you sense.

Also... I am very strongly in favor of the non-profit schools. Always be wary of any for-profit institutions... because your education and success are secondary to them making money off of you.

I hope the OP is having better luck now that he has been out of the program for a while.
Old 12th March 2017
  #14
wtg
Here for the gear
 
Advice Sought

Not trying to over post (this is my second and final post of this reply to thread) but it seems there are two active pages on this subject and I want to get as much info and experience based advice from people like you who are the industry. Thanks.

I’m looking for some advice. My grandson is looking to pursue a career in music. He is mainly interested in learning the ins and outs of recording and producing music with a long term goals of owning his own studio, representing artists and establishing himself as a music label. From all I can see he has passion and is willing to work hard on something he loves.

We are looking into Full Sail, CRAS, Musicians Institute, LA Recording and the Recording Connection. The first four would require him to take out pretty substantial student loans. The last one is attractively priced.

My initial questions are:
1. Does it make sense to be some $60,000 to $100,000 in student loan debt versus the income he would likely generate once he graduates? How much would you say is the upper limit on tuition we should be looking at?
2. Does anyone have any experience with any of these schools? Most of them seem to be classroom, or semi-classroom based with on campus studios. Recording Connection says they put you into commercial recording studios. This reminds me a lot of my college experience—I went to Antioch College which had a work/study approach to education. There could be some hit or miss. The good work experiences were awesome. The bad ones were garbage. Would this suggest that the choice of mentor explains the wide variance in their reviews?
3. How necessary is a degree vs. a certificate in the real world? Are jobs based on this or on actual work experience and demo reels?

Any suggestions or thoughts are greatly appreciated, especially from any RECENT alumni of any of the above mentioned schools. My grandson currently lives in the Los Angeles area if that makes a difference.
Old 12th March 2017
  #15
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Wyllys's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtg ➡️
Not trying to over post (this is my second and final post of this reply to thread) but it seems there are two active pages on this subject and I want to get as much info and experience based advice from people like you who are the industry. Thanks.

I’m looking for some advice. My grandson is looking to pursue a career in music. He is mainly interested in learning the ins and outs of recording and producing music with a long term goals of owning his own studio, representing artists and establishing himself as a music label. From all I can see he has passion and is willing to work hard on something he loves.

We are looking into Full Sail, CRAS, Musicians Institute, LA Recording and the Recording Connection. The first four would require him to take out pretty substantial student loans. The last one is attractively priced.

My initial questions are:
1. Does it make sense to be some $60,000 to $100,000 in student loan debt versus the income he would likely generate once he graduates? How much would you say is the upper limit on tuition we should be looking at?
2. Does anyone have any experience with any of these schools? Most of them seem to be classroom, or semi-classroom based with on campus studios. Recording Connection says they put you into commercial recording studios. This reminds me a lot of my college experience—I went to Antioch College which had a work/study approach to education. There could be some hit or miss. The good work experiences were awesome. The bad ones were garbage. Would this suggest that the choice of mentor explains the wide variance in their reviews?
3. How necessary is a degree vs. a certificate in the real world? Are jobs based on this or on actual work experience and demo reels?

Any suggestions or thoughts are greatly appreciated, especially from any RECENT alumni of any of the above mentioned schools. My grandson currently lives in the Los Angeles area if that makes a difference.
Honestly???

The Emperor has no clothes! Nude! Nekkid!

Anyone with the talent and aptitude requisite for success in the semi-fictitious world of "music production" will make it without such institutions. Incurring debt or "investing" money in such low-return SCAMS is not to be advised. Best bet is an un-paid apprenticeship with an actual, legitimate business. Even better is an E.E. degree.
Old 12th March 2017 | Show parent
  #16
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtg ➡️
...I want to get as much info and experience based advice from people like you who are the industry. Thanks.

We are looking into Full Sail, CRAS, Musicians Institute, LA Recording and the Recording Connection. The first four would require him to take out pretty substantial student loans. The last one is attractively priced.
The REAL question here is not can the degree or certificate from these programs earn your grandson enough to pay off his student loans!! The real question is can the certificate even land him any kind of work paying enough to live on! Even if there were no loans! In this industry it's a question whose answer is quite frequently "no".

If you have the money to spare, "audio school" can teach you the things you are supposed to know in a short period of time. As an educator, I have been impressed with the curriculum offered by many of these places. They often have excellent gear, cover the basics and usually have decent instructors. The key word is 'offered'. In my experience as an engineer meeting applicants for entry level positions, these places will give the certificate to anybody who pays their tuition! That makes the certificate nearly meaningless as an indicator of what the person knows. IOW, if you can learn it cheap, learn it cheap.

Keep in mind that each of these schools is graduating hundreds of people every semester into an industry where studios are closing every day, where even dedicated "fans" no longer pay for the music that they listen to daily. Keep in mind that the schools you have listed are only four among literally hundreds of programs both vocational and collegiate in the US.

The real bottleneck is on the "job" side. i.e. there are no "jobs".

Quote:
My grandson is looking to pursue a career in music.
Maybe he should go to a conservatory and learn how to play an instrument really really well and compose and arrange music. Actual musical knowledge and skill is getting harder to find, and can be a serious career if someone is willing to employ his talents in the service of others.

If your grandson wants to be an "artist" - singing and performing his own music - all I can say is good luck. There is no school that teaches this. If your grandson wanted to play professional tennis he would "only" have to be great. He could pay the fee, enter the US Open as a qualifier, and battle his way to the finals. His looks, his age and his connections wouldn't matter. If you want to get to the "finals" of music, it's not based on merit. What you have to offer has to meet the approval of an extremely fickle public as well as Lady Luck.

Quote:
He is mainly interested in learning the ins and outs of recording and producing music with a long term goals of owning his own studio, representing artists and establishing himself as a music label. From all I can see he has passion and is willing to work hard on something he loves.
You actually do not need to know anything about technology to represent artists and establish a label. This is essentially an entrepreneurial endeavor. Business and law are the relevant things to 'go to school for'. What you absolutely need is the ability to spot talent and the financial backing to invest in the product and promote it. Nearly everybody thinks they have this talent-spotting ability. A few of them actually do, but only a handful of those have the money to back it up. IMHO, having the money to invest is the hard part.

Quote:
owning his own studio
As a studio business? Or to record his art?

If you spend an hour or two randomly browsing this website, Gearslutz, you will see that nearly everybody here has his "own recording studio". But not a lot of them are making a profit renting it out, they are self recording musicians. Self-recording is rapidly becoming the new norm. Are these musicians making a profit selling their music? Not many of them as far as I can see. Anyway it is hard to keep a Studio Business open when more and more and more of your potential "customers" have their own studios.

There are obviously people out there who are successful in doing the things your grandson wants to do. They are living proof that his dream is not totally out of reach. But there is no path. They have to carve their own path. And not to put to fine a point on it, but most of them picked one dream or the other, not a smorgasbord of all the dreams rolled up into a vague set of generalities.
Old 12th March 2017 | Show parent
  #17
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtg ➡️
Not trying to over post (this is my second and final post of this reply to thread) but it seems there are two active pages on this subject and I want to get as much info and experience based advice from people like you who are the industry. Thanks.

I’m looking for some advice. My grandson is looking to pursue a career in music. He is mainly interested in learning the ins and outs of recording and producing music with a long term goals of owning his own studio, representing artists and establishing himself as a music label. From all I can see he has passion and is willing to work hard on something he loves.

We are looking into Full Sail, CRAS, Musicians Institute, LA Recording and the Recording Connection. The first four would require him to take out pretty substantial student loans. The last one is attractively priced.

My initial questions are:
1. Does it make sense to be some $60,000 to $100,000 in student loan debt versus the income he would likely generate once he graduates? How much would you say is the upper limit on tuition we should be looking at?
2. Does anyone have any experience with any of these schools? Most of them seem to be classroom, or semi-classroom based with on campus studios. Recording Connection says they put you into commercial recording studios. This reminds me a lot of my college experience—I went to Antioch College which had a work/study approach to education. There could be some hit or miss. The good work experiences were awesome. The bad ones were garbage. Would this suggest that the choice of mentor explains the wide variance in their reviews?
3. How necessary is a degree vs. a certificate in the real world? Are jobs based on this or on actual work experience and demo reels?

Any suggestions or thoughts are greatly appreciated, especially from any RECENT alumni of any of the above mentioned schools. My grandson currently lives in the Los Angeles area if that makes a difference.
The only corse / degree that is worth the paper and the money is known as the "Tonemeister".
I'm not sure any schools in the USA offer it.

60,000 to 100,000 is a joke just don't do it.

Seriously if you had the money you would be better off giving him 20k to get his own recording setup and then giving him a living allowance for 3 years.

This is an industry that is struggling with an oversaturation of inadequate and under qualified engineers in a market with ever sliming margins.

I haven't had one intern from SAE or similar schools that I haven't had to let go after a week. They simply haven't had enough hands on experience and many a filled with delusions of grandeur that simply don't fly in the real world.

Tell him to try assisting at live gigs for a while, if he can take the pace, the ****storm and the continual headache then he may have what it takes in the studio.

Read read and read some more. There are plenty of great books that will teach him the theory required all at a total cost of $500 or less.
Then he has to talk is way into a job- that's just the way it is, it's a people business and unless you can go out and talk people into working with you, business will go VERY slowly.
Old 15th March 2017 | Show parent
  #18
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by KidsOfThe90s ➡️
Just skip to the end if it's too much to read lol, really need help on this one.
Here’s my two cents.
1. Being that much in debt will ruin your grandson’s 20s (and maybe even his 30s). Depends on what your grandson can afford or is willing to do without. For instance, maybe his folks promised him a car when he graduated high school. If he can do without that car and have them apply that money to his tuition then the price of that car is the upper limit I would consider.
2. I graduated from the Recording Connection a few years back. I had a great mentor and a great experience. I imagine my take on it would be different if I had a crappy mentor, but you DO get to agree to your mentor before you enroll. Make sure you are satisfied with the mentor they recommend, ask them everything you need to know before deciding you want them as your teacher. So yes, that might be part of the reason for the wide disparity in their reviews.
3. Degrees really don’t count for much, if anything. Sometimes they can even work against you. You know how Dentists and Doctors always have their diplomas on their walls. I’ve never seen an audio engineer display a diploma. I have seen many of them display Gold and Platinum Records on their walls however. It’s all about the work you’ve done and the contacts you’ve established.

Finally, I wish your grandson lots of luck. Tell him for me that overnight successes take ten years to happen, and that he will have to hustle his butt off to get through those ten years, but if he truly loves what he’s doing and works real hard, he will be a happy man.
Old 16th March 2017 | Show parent
  #19
wtg
Here for the gear
 
Thanks Wyllys, joeq, DannyMac, Danny143Egg for all the responses. Given me much to think about and more questions to ask my grandson. Appreciate all of you taking your time to help. I'll probably have more questions in a week or two.
Old 18th March 2017
  #20
Here for the gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny143Egg ➡️
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidsOfThe90s ➡️
Just skip to the end if it's too much to read lol, really need help on this one.
Here’s my two cents.
1. Being that much in debt will ruin your grandson’s 20s (and maybe even his 30s). Depends on what your grandson can afford or is willing to do without. For instance, maybe his folks promised him a car when he graduated high school. If he can do without that car and have them apply that money to his tuition then the price of that car is the upper limit I would consider.
2. I graduated from the Recording Connection a few years back. I had a great mentor and a great experience. I imagine my take on it would be different if I had a crappy mentor, but you DO get to agree to your mentor before you enroll. Make sure you are satisfied with the mentor they recommend, ask them everything you need to know before deciding you want them as your teacher. So yes, that might be part of the reason for the wide disparity in their reviews.
3. Degrees really don’t count for much, if anything. Sometimes they can even work against you. You know how Dentists and Doctors always have their diplomas on their walls. I’ve never seen an audio engineer display a diploma. I have seen many of them display Gold and Platinum Records on their walls however. It’s all about the work you’ve done and the contacts you’ve established.

Finally, I wish your grandson lots of luck. Tell him for me that overnight successes take ten years to happen, and that he will have to hustle his butt off to get through those ten years, but if he truly loves what he’s doing and works real hard, he will be a happy man.
Since you graduated from Recording connection did you actually got the job you worked so hard for?
Because im 18 and im wondering if i should go to this school or not..
Old 18th March 2017
  #21
Here for the gear
 
Like im more worried if i actually got the dreamjob i am looking for..
Just thinking if this school is worth it or not..
By the way im a senior from high school
Old 26th March 2017
  #22
wtg
Here for the gear
 
Thanks for the responses

The general consensus on this thread seems to be that there are few jobs in audio engineering these days and that you can learn what you need about recording on your own and that business skills and financial backing are more important than learning how to use the equipment.

Yet it also seems to me that there must be a reason certain recording studios are busy churning out hits while others are relegated to scrambling to keep the doors open. Is this a fair statement?

I've always found in my own experience that if I got inside a business I could figure out what I wanted to do and the path to get me there. This approach always seemed to me to be the fastest way to get where I wanted to go. Does this apply to the recording industry?

There's an old saying, "if you want to get rich don't hang around poor people." Is this applicable in the music business--in other words, if you want to be successful in the recording/producing side of music hang around people who are already successful?

OR, as some have stated, there are no jobs at any level for anyone in today's recording industry? It seems there is more money than ever in music these days--is it just reallocated so that engineers are no longer being used? David Byrne's book "How Music Works" certainly indicates there has been a shift in the money side of things.
Old 26th March 2017 | Show parent
  #23
Lives for gear
 
Wyllys's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtg ➡️
The general consensus on this thread seems to be that there are few jobs in audio engineering these days and that you can learn what you need about recording on your own and that business skills and financial backing are more important than learning how to use the equipment.
I wouldn't say that. The take-away from this should be that b***s*** "schools" give you zero employable skills in the industry. There are legitimate, accredited courses available through REAL universities, and an EE degree will set you up as well or better than most degrees.
Old 26th March 2017 | Show parent
  #24
Lives for gear
 
Owen L T's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtg ➡️
He is mainly interested in learning the ins and outs of recording and producing music with a long term goals of owning his own studio, representing artists and establishing himself as a music label.
One thing that strikes me on rereading this, is that in this one sentence alone, you've referenced several very distinct areas of the music industry. Learning to record music well enough to be a professional engineer takes years of training, hard work and talent. But that's a very different career path from 'representing artists', which requires zero audio-engineering skills, but a whole host of other business and networking skills. And the jumping off point for either one is very, very different. Likewise, owning a studio and running a label aren't - usually - two stops on the same career track. Obviously he has many, many years to find his path, and you can't plot it out from the get go - but at the same time, before investing time and money, I think both of you need to be a lot clearer about, for instance, whether your grandson wants to be actively engaged in the business of making recordings, as an engineer/producer, or whether he really wants to be at the business running end of things. Because there's a whole world of difference between them, and the skills, training etc to become successful at them. (And just to pre-empt being jumped on by fellow GS, I know there are any number of examples of people who migrated their success from, say, playing to producing to setting up a label. Most of these people, it turns out, didn't take courses in either producing or label owning - though many DID have music lessons. But if one is looking at putting a chunk of upfront change into education in one of these areas, then it would make sense to be as clear as possible about where one's interest - and abilities - really lie.)
Old 26th March 2017 | Show parent
  #25
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snelz32 ➡️
Like im more worried if i actually got the dreamjob i am looking for..
yeah every time I buy a lottery ticket I "worry" about how 'disruptive' winning 20 million dollars would be to my life.
Old 27th March 2017 | Show parent
  #26
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtg ➡️
... business skills and financial backing are more important than learning how to use the equipment.
If you want to strive to get employed as an engineer - then I would say learning how to use the equipment is paramount. What jobs there are would still be insanely competitive. What does not matter is HOW you learned to use the gear. i.e., the "diploma" or "certificate" from a school is largely irrelevant.

If you want to own a studio, own a label, "develop artists" then, yes you need money. And then even more money to cover your incorrect guesses. Your losing bets. Obviously if you have that kind of money to throw away, your label is just a Plaything to you and you don't really need to work for a living anyway.

Quote:
Yet it also seems to me that there must be a reason certain recording studios are busy churning out hits while others are relegated to scrambling to keep the doors open. Is this a fair statement?
not really - many of the best studios in the world have closed, including places that were "churning" out the hits right up to the end. If there is some formula for survival, it is surprising that these top studios were not able to figure it out.

Of course, as more major players drop out, whatever work there is falls to the ones who are "left standing". So they may look like they figured something out. But maybe they just were lucky. If they last one more day than the other studio, they get to pick on those uneaten carcasses. There's a drought. No water, no grass. No grass, no herbivores. No herbivores, no predators.

Don't forget, every time one of these big studios closes, a number of World-Class engineers and high-level assistants also re-enter the job market! (such as it is) Any studio still left open has a choice to hire these experienced pros instead of some kid from Full Sail.

Quote:
I've always found in my own experience that if I got inside a business I could figure out what I wanted to do and the path to get me there.
Path: I teach audio classes at a college. I have parents come to me and tell me their son wants to be a musician but they want him to learn audio recording "as a fallback" . They think because Audio involves machines and not a guitar that it is more stable! But both are 'glamour' professions that have no end of people who will work for free just to be close to it.

Quote:
There's an old saying, "if you want to get rich don't hang around poor people."
And who is poorer than musicians? My saying would be: "if you want to get rich, sell something that people in all walks of life need (like cars or food or medicine) ; don't sell something obscure like Studio Time that only Musicians want (and may not even need).

Quote:
... hang around people who are already successful?
Many of the very successful people I have met have small armies of employees whose main job is keeping those who want to "hang around" them at arm's length. Or farther! It's not some big "loophole" that no one else has thought of.

Quote:
It seems there is more money than ever in music these days...is it just reallocated so that engineers are no longer being used?
All I can tell you is that it doesn't seem that way to me!
It used to be that when a record company released a record, any consumer who wanted to hear that record 'on demand' in his own home HAD TO buy his own hard copy. Period. If someone wanted to steal it, they couldn't just click their mouse on a pirate site. They had to fit a 12" vinyl under a large coat and shoplift it from the store. The labels could risk lots of money developing artists because everybody paid for music - if one record was a hit, it could pay for ten losers.

It's pretty simple, really. Budgets to make 'records' are much smaller nowadays because nobody buys records. Those budgets are what used to keep the studios open and busy. Today, what "sales" there are, are wrapped up in a handful of GIANT artists -instead of lots of smaller artists. How many studios are needed to record Beyonce, Adele and Bruno Mars? Three! No matter how much money those 3 records generate, only three studios need to be 'employed'. They get their card rate, no doubt, but when the session is over, they usually don't get a share of the royalties. As soon as Beyonce leaves, even those top studios are looking around nervously and asking 'what's next'?

and of course on the other end, much of the smaller day-to-day bread-and-butter Demo and Vanity work is gone to home recording and self-recording. Squeezed at both ends.
Old 22nd March 2018
  #27
Here for the gear
 
Is there anyway to get your money back from them? I know this is old but it just happened to me. Supposedly the citation from the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education was cleared and all i could do is file a complaint.
Old 9th November 2020
  #28
Here for the gear
 
So I spoke with Mr.Danny Bwinika who represents Recording Connection as an Audio Engineer/Administration Representative and he himself told me he's never worked as an engineer nor ever worked in a recording studio period. After confronting him on how he's presenting himself as a rep for this company he just avoided all emails/contact. See, what Mr. Bwinika didn't know is that I've worked in a studio before, I actually have friends who are recording artists relevant to the current hip hop industry. Yall would know their names if I spoke them. More importantly I have spoke with local recording studios that are willing to use Recording Connection yet I can go through the actual studio and cancel them and actually learn. Let's just say this without getting too deep. Recording Connection is a scam! All you young guys wanting to be engineers yall look at MTSU or any other university that can actually give you a bachelor's in recording/audio engineering. In my 20's that's what I wanted to do. If any of you young guys wanna career in it text me at [email protected] and for free as a friend and for the love of music I'll help guide y'all in the right direction. I'm 45 and chose another career yet I'll tell each of you there are vultures out here trying to make money off of kids/young adults with their fake a** programs.
Old 12th November 2020
  #29
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
That's a shame. I took the course years ago.

I took the course back in 2009-2010, and they pretty much delivered what they promised. I got lucky with the studio owner I was placed with - I stayed assisting him part time for over 5 years, and we are still friends.

Of course, this was before they started making implausible claims about job placement. When they started doing that, they certainly entered scam territory, at least.

As it was configured originally, it delivered a good product, provided the student was persistent if needed to get into a studio that would work for them. It should have been very lucrative, as they charged $7,500, and their only expenses were some printed training materials and whatever they paid the studios who took on the students. Compared to Full Sail, NYU/Tisch, et al., it was a cheaper way in that would get you most of what the others provided. In my case it provided lots more.

WW
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