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saturation that works backwards ?
Old 27th February 2014
  #1
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stinkyfingers's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
saturation that works backwards ?

for saturation, increase input level = more harmonics
is there something that does the opposite ?
decrease input level = more harmonics ?
so a 0 dBFS 'tone' would be 'clean', and would (increasingly) get more thd as the signal approaches the noise floor.
Old 27th February 2014
  #2
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Jolly Jimmy's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
I seem to recall Chris from AirWindows talking about something along these lines.
Old 27th February 2014
  #3
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Interesting question. Is there some kind of panner plugin that responds to level? i.e. quiet goes to left, loud goes to right? You could put the saturation on the left, and run the right clean, and then sum them to a single channel.
Old 27th February 2014
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I think MAutoDynamicEQ or Toneboosters FlX could be set up to do this, but limited to a chosen band and its harmonics.
Old 28th February 2014
  #5
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bogosort's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by stinkyfingers ➡️
for saturation, increase input level = more harmonics
is there something that does the opposite ?
decrease input level = more harmonics ?
so a 0 dBFS 'tone' would be 'clean', and would (increasingly) get more thd as the signal approaches the noise floor.
Neat idea! I'm trying to think of how it could be done but not coming up with anything that seems like it would sound good. Saturation is typically performed with a function that behaves linearly for small inputs, but as the input increases the output is compressed (usually pegging it at some max value). A common function is the hyperbolic tangent: out = tanh(in) will behave like the input for small inputs, but "squeeze" the output as the input approaches 1. This squeezing distorts the waveform and generates harmonics.

A reverse saturator would have to squeeze from the bottom, but this destroys the bipolarity of the waveform -- if it can't get below a certain amplitude then it can never go negative. What you end up with is a rectified signal with a DC offset. Something like the hyperbolic secant would do it.

I wonder what sech(sin(x)) sounds like?
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