Quantcast
Computer suggestion for music production (preferably Mac) - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Computer suggestion for music production (preferably Mac)
Old 21st January 2013
  #1
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Computer suggestion for music production (preferably Mac)

Hey, I am looking for advice on a good computer to produce my music with. I've just been working on a crappy HP laptop and I want to upgrade to something really nice. I'm not too concerned on the budget, I'll pay what I have to. I'm just tired of having a computer that either slows and gets glitchy or crashes from having too many tracks and plugins in a song. I don't even use that many plugins and they're just built in one's in my DAW; however, I want to start using much better plugins that I know will take up much more of my CPU. I'm quite ignorant when it comes to computer specs etc. So I was hoping that someone could either suggest a nice computer for music production that won't seem to struggle from having tons of tracks and plugins. I am just a bedroom producer; however, I want to start making more high quality stuff. I've become considerably better at mixing music and have now reached the point that my gear is holding me back. Anyways, the first thing I want to upgrade is my computer. So yeah, it'd be great if I could get a suggestion on a specific computer or at the very least, what to look for when buying a computer. I am interested in getting a Mac by the way. I don't really want to deal with PCs anymore...
Old 21st January 2013
  #2
Lives for gear
 
skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
I am interested in getting a Mac by the way.
That should have been in the SUBJ line. Your request is a little vague. Laptop? Desktop?

Come up with a budget or you'll get recommendations from $800 to $8000.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #3
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by skira ➑️
That should have been in the SUBJ line. Your request is a little vague. Laptop? Desktop?

Come up with a budget or you'll get recommendations from $800 to $8000.
OK, sorry, I'll edit that in if I can... I really have no preference on it being a laptop or desktop. I mean, if there's a laptop that can handle music production, than sure, why not, but I kinda doubt there's a laptop out there that will run as smoothly as I'd like it to, when I'm recording, mixing or mastering. I've never heard of an $8000 computer before... :S but I'm willing to pay somewhere between $1000-$3000. Possibly a little more if it's worth it...
Old 21st January 2013
  #4
Lives for gear
 
skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
You can get pretty much any Mac you want then. It's up to you to decide on your specific needs (eg mobility, large screen, SSD, Fusion drive) in your budget. Any Mac these days should fit the bill, depending on the software you have and how you use it.

Heck, these days some people are using the $5048-track Auria app with their $500 iPads and $5 synths to make good music.

If you have specific questions about specific Macs go ahead, but I'm afraid you're still a little vague.

You might try using the SEARCH function as there's a ton of similar questions on GS - this is the 1st one that popped up

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/music...on-2012-a.html

when I did this Google search:

https://www.google.com/search?q=mac+...:gearslutz.com
Old 21st January 2013
  #5
Gear Addict
 
jwleeman's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I'm also looking for a new machine as well. Here's what I'm thinking of getting for ~ $3000:

iMac

3.4GHz quad-core Intel Core i7
1TB Serial ATA Drive @ 7200 rpm
32GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM
Number of USB 3.0 Ports: 4
Number of Thunderbolt Ports: 2

I'll use one TB port for the audio interface, the other one for an external hard drive dedicated to streaming large sample libraries. One USB port will accommodate a hub for licensing dongles, and the other 3 will connect to other external hard drives most likely.

Some people might recommend a Mac Pro, but now's not the greatest time to buy one of those, and it also breaks the bank.

-jeff
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #6
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by skira ➑️
You can get pretty much any Mac you want then. It's up to you to decide on your specific needs (eg mobility, large screen, SSD, Fusion drive) in your budget. Any Mac these days should fit the bill, depending on the software you have and how you use it.

Heck, these days some people are using the $5048-track Auria app with their $500 iPads and $5 synths to make good music.

If you have specific questions about specific Macs go ahead, but I'm afraid you're still a little vague.

You might try using the SEARCH function as there's a ton of similar questions on GS - this is the 1st one that popped up

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/music...on-2012-a.html

when I did this Google search:

https://www.google.com/search?q=mac+...:gearslutz.com
I don't see how I'm being vague... :S I'm asking a simple question. I just want advice from people who produce music and know a lot about music both music production and computers to give decent advice. I don't want to go ask some guy at an electronic store who only has knowledge on computers and knows nothing about music production. I highly doubt people are producing high quality music from an iPad. I don't doubt they are composting songs on them, but I'm sure when it comes to releasing a song, they'd redo many things at a computer and properly mix and master it. Anyways, I think I was reasonably clear with the price range and the fact that I stated that I plan to run a lot of plugins. Seeing as I know nothing about processors and RAM etc. I can't really get more detailed. I'm simply asking for advice on a nice Mac that will do the job. I don't necessarily want something that's over kill, but I certainly need something that will handle everything smoothly and will potentially last me several years. I guess if I had to ask about something more specific I'd ask, are Mac book pros or Mac minis actually good enough for someone who's serious about producing high quality music and is planning to run tons of plugins? Anyways... that's really all I can say. I hope you can say something a little more than "that's too vague" because, I do feel like I've explained myself reasonably well.
Old 21st January 2013
  #7
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
I use a late 2011 MacBook Pro with 8 GB of RAM running Pro Tools 10 and have been happy with it. However, if I could build a computer dedicated to recording I would buy a Mac Mini and a Thunderbolt Display for the versatility in I/O.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #8
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Given To Fly ➑️
I use a late 2011 MacBook Pro with 8 GB of RAM running Pro Tools 10 and have been happy with it. However, if I could build a computer dedicated to recording I would buy a Mac Mini and a Thunderbolt Display for the versatility in I/O.
Yeah, I just checked out the link the other guy sent me and there seems to be a lot of talk about the Mac Mini Server. I'll have to look into it more and see if it will do the job. Do you run many plugins on your MacBook Pro? Right now I just use the plugins in my DAW and even those plugins kill the computer I have right now; however, I plan to use Waves, UAD, and Native plugins in the future, which take a lot more power.
Old 21st January 2013
  #9
Gear Addict
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
The Mac Mini is looking pretty nice these days. You can get a Mac Mini with a 2.6 Ghz i7 and 8 GB of RAM for only a grand. Adding an Apple keyboard and mouse and AppleCare brings it to 1300. Get a monitor (Newegg.com - Dell ST2220L Glossy Black 21.5" 5ms HDMI LED Backlight Widescreen LCD Monitor DC 8000000:1 (1000:1)) and you are finished at humble 1400 dollars. Plus, you only have to replace one thing at a time (instead of overhauling the whole thing every three or four years).

Also: the only benefit of a Mac Mini Server is having two hard drives. You can still install two hard drives in the regular Mac Mini, but you would have to do it manually (http://www.ifixit.com/Apple-Parts/Ma...-Kit/IF171-005). The benefit of two hard drives is that you can record onto one and use another one for the system drive, which improves performance (and is a necessity in ProTools).
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #10
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunjji ➑️
The Mac Mini is looking pretty nice these days. You can get a Mac Mini with a 2.6 Ghz i7 and 8 GB of RAM for only a grand. Adding an Apple keyboard and mouse and AppleCare brings it to 1300. Get a monitor (Newegg.com - Dell ST2220L Glossy Black 21.5" 5ms HDMI LED Backlight Widescreen LCD Monitor DC 8000000:1 (1000:1)) and you are finished at humble 1400 dollars. Plus, you only have to replace one thing at a time (instead of overhauling the whole thing every three or four years).

Also: the only benefit of a Mac Mini Server is having two hard drives. You can still install two hard drives in the regular Mac Mini, but you would have to do it manually (Mac Mini Dual Hard Drive Kit (922-9560, 076-1391) - iFixit). The benefit of two hard drives is that you can record onto one and use another one for the system drive, which improves performance (and is a necessity in ProTools).
Ok, thanks for letting my in on the difference of a mac mini server and mac mini :P also, correct me if I am wrong, but is it true that you can use any kinda of monitor or keyboard. Hmm... I'm not entirely sure if the two hard drives is is a necessity for Presnous Studio One, but I'm sure it's the same as ProTools in the sense.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #11
XI-MACHINES
 
DAW PLUS's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwleeman ➑️
I'll use one TB port for the audio interface, the other one for an external hard drive dedicated to streaming large sample libraries. One USB port will accommodate a hub for licensing dongles, and the other 3 will connect to other external hard drives most likely.
When using TB, make sure to check the extra costs tied with it. Also check whether the licensing dongles are compatible with USB3, since USB3 is not as compatible as the industry claims it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OolalavSuperfukk ➑️
Hmm... I'm not entirely sure if the two hard drives is is a necessity for Presnous Studio One, but I'm sure it's the same as ProTools in the sense.
It is the same for all DAW's: using harddrives, you will want at least 2. When using an SSD, it doesn't really matter unless you do a lot of live recording (which should still not be an issue but you just don't want to take the risk in such a situation).
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #12
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by OolalavSuperfukk ➑️
Yeah, I just checked out the link the other guy sent me and there seems to be a lot of talk about the Mac Mini Server. I'll have to look into it more and see if it will do the job. Do you run many plugins on your MacBook Pro? Right now I just use the plugins in my DAW and even those plugins kill the computer I have right now; however, I plan to use Waves, UAD, and Native plugins in the future, which take a lot more power.
I only use a few plugins and they are all built into Pro Tools, but they definitely don't kill the computer. What can eat up all the power is trying to track everything at the highest bit/sample rate possible while maintaining the lowest latency possible. However, on a good day I've pulled it off.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #13
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAW PLUS ➑️
When using TB, make sure to check the extra costs tied with it. Also check whether the licensing dongles are compatible with USB3, since USB3 is not as compatible as the industry claims it is.

It is the same for all DAW's: using harddrives, you will want at least 2. When using an SSD, it doesn't really matter unless you do a lot of live recording (which should still not be an issue but you just don't want to take the risk in such a situation).
ok thanks, and yeah, i don't do any live recording. i'm just a one man band. i just record my own material; however, i want to reach the point that i'm making quality recordings and could record others as well.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #14
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Given To Fly ➑️
I only use a few plugins and they are all built into Pro Tools, but they definitely don't kill the computer. What can eat up all the power is trying to track everything at the highest bit/sample rate possible while maintaining the lowest latency possible. However, on a good day I've pulled it off.
i do often switch the sample rate, but i don't like the idea of switching the bit rate due to the quality change. i want to be able to mix the true sound and not mix to what i hear.
Old 21st January 2013
  #15
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Another important question is which DAW software do you use? If you want to run Logic for instance, you don't have a choice, you need a Mac.

For any of the cross-platform DAWs, you will get better performance from a PC running Windows compared to the same hardware running Mac OS. At low latencies that can be up to as much as 3 times as many plugins.

As an example, my latest project has about 150 audio tracks, 14 Virtual Instruments and more than 180 FX plugins. (And a lot of those are heavy hitters). This is on a Core i7 980X which is about 3 years old. I once did a test and this box can run 1000 stereo tracks at 96Khz in Cubase. More than anyone could reasonably ever need.

Alistair
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #16
Gear Addict
 
OolalavSuperfukk's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow ➑️
Another important question is which DAW software do you use? If you want to run Logic for instance, you don't have a choice, you need a Mac.

For any of the cross-platform DAWs, you will get better performance from a PC running Windows compared to the same hardware running Mac OS. At low latencies that can be up to as much as 3 times as many plugins.

As an example, my latest project has about 150 audio tracks, 14 Virtual Instruments and more than 180 FX plugins. (And a lot of those are heavy hitters). This is on a Core i7 980X which is about 3 years old. I once did a test and this box can run 1000 stereo tracks at 96Khz in Cubase. More than anyone could reasonably ever need.

Alistair
wow, nice! and is that all because of the Core i7 980X? I'm using Presonus Studio One 2 Pro. Also what you said about the Mac OS vs PC, is that true for all Macs vs PCs? Just wondering, cos it does seem like there are a lot more people using Macs in the music industry or really any art industry. Anyways, correct me if I'm wrong, like I said, I obviously use a computer just fine like anyone else, but my actual knowledge about them and what certain things do is pretty much non existent
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #17
Lives for gear
 
Synth Buddha's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by OolalavSuperfukk ➑️
wow, nice! and is that all because of the Core i7 980X? I'm using Presonus Studio One 2 Pro. Also what you said about the Mac OS vs PC, is that true for all Macs vs PCs? Just wondering, cos it does seem like there are a lot more people using Macs in the music industry or really any art industry. Anyways, correct me if I'm wrong, like I said, I obviously use a computer just fine like anyone else, but my actual knowledge about them and what certain things do is pretty much non existent
Two reasons, basically. Dollar for dollar you get considerably higher quality components if you buy a PC than if you buy a Mac. Secondly, Windows 7 is a lot more efficient than OSX, and it's easier to code for too, according to range of developers ranging from the people behind EWQL to DAW developer's like Cockos Reaper's Justin Frankel. You therefore get a lot better performance and also less issues with a Windows computer than a similarly priced Apple solution.

I've retired my Mac from its music production duties, but I'm still using both platforms because I currently collaborate with Mac users. The difference in performance and stability is staggering. My personal studio PC is well into its fourth year and yet it's absolutely rock solid and still handles all kinds of new, demanding plugins really well. That blue screen thing some of the sMac users keep talking about? Never had one. Not once. On the Macs, however, we get that beach ball thrown in our face a LOT. The Macs also run out of steam a lot quicker, even though they're newer and cost one hell of a lot more. There are also more compatibility issues on OSX than on Windows 7.

I suggest you take a good look at the test results at dawbench.com. They speak for themselves. As UnderTow says, every single cross platform DAW runs more efficiently on Windows 7 than it does on OSX. And the difference isn't exactly slight. In other words, when you buy a Mac you pay not only have to pay more for an inferior computer in terms of specs, but you also need to use an operating system that is less efficient. Hence all the "I have an eight core Mac and it's struggling with just a few instances of this plugin" comment that you've probably heard.

Of course, the more cultish Mac users will tell you that it's in fact the other way around, that Macs are somehow still "better" than PCs in this regard, or - as they've started doing now - you don't need the very best computer to make music anyway, people were happily using Ataris back in the nineties (I was one of them) and bla bla bla. They also like to talk about all kinds of problems with using Windows PCs that us actual users don't experience much at all. I wonder if these people take themselves seriously - the rest of us certainly don't. It's an interesting phenomenon, though.

There may still be some advantages to buying a Mac, however. As UnderTow pointed out, if you have to use Logic then of course a PC isn't going to do you much good. Same thing with Garage Band. Furthermore, controlling external MIDI instruments over USB seems slightly better to me with the Macs than with the PCs. On my PC I use a PCI MIDI interface when I use my external synths and samplers for drums, arps etc because USB MIDI really isn't a lot of fun to have to deal with. I'm also getting an Expert Sleepers and/or Innerclock solution for that issue soon, as I'm back to using more and more hardware instruments in my studio. USB MIDI isn't great on Macs either, but I do think it's slightly better.

Macs also look better. The MacBook Pro I'm typing on now looks GREAT, and the external build quality is also great. As is the keyboard. If that stuff is important to you then maybe you want a Mac. This particular one only has two USB ports, though, so using it in my studio with all my hardware stuff has been pretty much impossible. In theory you could just use a couple of USB hubs to get around the problem, but when you actually try that you quickly realize that some devices don't really want to share USB ports and start making a mess - and music making becomes more of a problem solving thing than anything else. Not fun.

I should balance this post with the fact Macs have been great for music production in the past, though. They really have. Go back a few years and these things were easily better than PCs. No question about that in my mind. When Apple was more of a niche company they obviously cared strongly about all the creatives who were using their computers, and they arguable made the best machines for music, film work etc. Because of that other companies were focusing strongly on the platform and making great software and hardware solutions for it as well. Nowadays Apple seem to have other priorities (who could blame them - there's just no real money to be made with people like us when you compare it to the market for iPads & iPhones etc), and the platform is no longer what it used to be. Disappointing, perhaps, but such is life: Everything changes.

If you have to use Logic (great value for money at the moment) then you obviously need a Mac. If using some other DAW then you're probably much, much better off with a PC.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #18
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by OolalavSuperfukk ➑️
wow, nice! and is that all because of the Core i7 980X? I'm using Presonus Studio One 2 Pro. Also what you said about the Mac OS vs PC, is that true for all Macs vs PCs? Just wondering, cos it does seem like there are a lot more people using Macs in the music industry or really any art industry. Anyways, correct me if I'm wrong, like I said, I obviously use a computer just fine like anyone else, but my actual knowledge about them and what certain things do is pretty much non existent
My CPU is fast. It the 2nd fastest CPU of that generation (We are one generation further now) but the performance comparison is true for all Macs. If you have the latest Mac Pro and benchmark the performance in Cubase or Studio One then boot up the same Mac with Windows through bootcamp and benchmark again, you will get significantly better performance. The difference is in the OS.

Synth Buddha goes into the details in his posts including compatibility issues between Mac OS versions and application versions. I will just add Steinberg to the list of developers that mention that Windows is a much better OS for audio. And one correction to Synth Buddha's post: Macs might once have been faster but that is at least a decade ago. I have been paying close attention ever since I benchmarked my then brand new dual Opteron PC against the latest and fastest Power Mac G5 that just came out. (This was in 2005) My self-built PC was 4 times more powerful for a variety of applications (not just audio). Apple caught up a bit when they switched to Intel CPUs but never closed the gap.

Why so many creative people still buy Macs? I am not sure. It certainly isn't for the performance. I think the marketing and shiny look have a lot to do with it...

Alistair
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #19
Lives for gear
 
Synth Buddha's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow ➑️
And one correction to Synth Buddha's post: Macs might once have been faster but that is at least a decade ago. I have been paying close attention ever since I benchmarked my then brand new dual Opteron PC against the latest and fastest Power Mac G5 that just came out. (This was in 2005) My self-built PC was 4 times more powerful for a variety of applications (not just audio). Apple caught up a bit when they switched to Intel CPUs but never closed the gap.
Yes, I was thinking of times like back in the early nineties when you had the great Opcode solutions and so on. For the time that stuff was pretty darn good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow ➑️
Why so many creative people still buy Macs? I am not sure. It certainly isn't for the performance. I think the marketing and shiny look have a lot to do with it...
There are other reasons too. Some have claimed that it's, um, "the experience." Others have mentioned something called "the Apple lifestyle."

Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #20
Lives for gear
 
skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by OolalavSuperfukk ➑️
Yeah, I just checked out the link the other guy sent me and there seems to be a lot of talk about the Mac Mini Server.
Check it out some more. The only difference between the mid-level min and the Server is the addition of a 2nd $90 internal 1Tb drive, that's it. (Plus the $35 Server software upgerade, which you don't need.) But Apple charges you $200 extra.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #21
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow ➑️
Why so many creative people still buy Macs? I am not sure. It certainly isn't for the performance. I think the marketing and shiny look have a lot to do with it...

Alistair
It is because it's what we know. I was using a 2CII back in college for heavens sake. I've had about 10 Macs in my life.

It's not easy to change. I use a PC at work and I have to say, I hate it. I just don't like the way they work.

However, with the least few years, I'm on my 3rd Mac Pro, that's about 3 x $3000 down the drain again because these things have short shelve lives. And yeah I am one of those with 8 so called cores and can't run big projects anymore. What happens? Who knows, motherboard, memory riser, stuff just stops working, and with Macs you don't go off to replace a motherboard for $1500. It's designed so that you buy a new one. With Mac, you ALWAYS need to buy a new one. Whatever it is.

Yeah back when we were running 7.5.1 in dirty cream plastic and even OSX on the G5s it was still good. Once you moved over into Intel territory, your looking at huge heavy expensive paperweights. Maybe some secret strength under the hood, some toys for the converted. Honestly not much difference (except everything seemed to cost so much more and was all proprietary?) if you were actually using the thing. If one thing goes wrong, you're gonna need to put up $3000, again. Are you ready for that? Me, I am seriously considering buying PC this time, as clunky and unpredictable as they are, I trust I can get music done on them. Macs are for people with a lot of money who like to look good. I just want to get work done.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #22
Lives for gear
 
skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke ➑️
I'm on my 3rd Mac Pro, that's about 3 x $3000 down the drain again because these things have short shelve lives.
For me it's the opposite. At work I get a new PC every 2 years, but my Macs last for 3-5 years. I just picked up a Mac mini after running into the ground an iMac I've had since 2007. Before that I had a dual-processor G4 PowerMac, before that a 68030-based Duo 230 laptop plus DuoDock, and before that a Mac Plus. That's every main Mac I've had... since 1986.
Old 21st January 2013
  #23
Gear Addict
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
If you do want to go the PC route, building it yourself or having somebody build it for you is probably the best way to go about it (the pre built computers aren't much less than their equivalent macs). Here is a build I have that is very good (dual TB ports, 4 USB 3 ports, 3.5 Ghz processor, 32 GB of RAM) Intel Core i7-3770K, Antec Eleven Hundred - System Build - PCPartPicker
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #24
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by skira ➑️
For me it's the opposite. At work I get a new PC every 2 years, but my Macs last for 3-5 years. I just picked up a Mac mini after running into the ground an iMac I've had since 2007. Before that I had a dual-processor G4 PowerMac, before that a 68030-based Duo 230 laptop plus DuoDock, and before that a Mac Plus. That's every main Mac I've had... since 1986.
A PC every 1 or 2 years is fine at their price.

A new MacPro at over $3000 for every 3 years is not fine. Being clear, I have only owned desktops, I don't use laptops, ipads/pods, minis, iMacs, I have only owned standing towers of various colors over the years I would guess that the smaller amateur/semi pro machines probably see less work than I put onto mine between graphics/video/and music. Maybe they last longer?

I understand that people stick by their Macs - I was one of them. I may get a Mini one of these days for home computing as I do prefer the OS, but the stainless steel floor anchors with mint parts that break down and need replacing, I am done with them. Perhaps the Mini is actually indeed good enough for pro audio, we'll see.

I could probably get a mini and a PC and still be better off financially than the next MacPro, more flexible, and easier, less headache when something does go wrong.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #25
Lives for gear
 
skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke ➑️
A new MacPro at over $3000 for every 3 years is not fine.
I don't know anyone who isn't running a production video shop (or music studio) who needs to update Mac Pros that often, do you?

But I'll say this: by purchasing a new Mac (of any kind), getting Applecare then selling it after the Applecare expires in 3 years and buying a new machine will get a good price on his used machine, the equivalent of a discounted price on the new one, and a guaranty of everlasting warranty.
Old 21st January 2013
  #26
Gear Maniac
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
I use a 2012 2.3ghz i7 quad core Macbook pro.

Its really great.

This computer has the same power as Mac pro's of only 5 years ago.

Running Logic pro, with just the stock plug-ins, running 20 track songs with plenty of plug-ins on each track, the cpu has got so much to spare.

I have just 4 gigs of ram, and thats plenty for me.

Highly recommended.
Old 21st January 2013 | Show parent
  #27
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by skira ➑️
I don't know anyone who isn't running a production video shop (or music studio) who needs to update Mac Pros that often, do you?

But I'll say this: by purchasing a new Mac (of any kind), getting Applecare then selling it after the Applecare expires in 3 years and buying a new machine will get a good price on his used machine, the equivalent of a discounted price on the new one, and a guaranty of everlasting warranty.
Need ot not need. If you have one and it breaks down, you will have to buy another one. They break down. At least in my world, they do.

The 1st 2 MacPros I brought and carried right out of the Apple Store myself had to be boxed back up and brought back the next morning because of hardware issues. I honestly think these things are hit or miss.

I don't sell old computers, I rarely get involved in selling stuff, I still have about 4 Mac Towers stuffed in a back closet. But then again, when motherboards break down, you don't have that sort of option. I don't think the market for heavy 3 year old solid stainless steel anchors are really that great anyways, nor is it convenient to run around town with... not my thing.
I'm sure people do great buying and selling their Macs every other year. I try to focus on just getting my work done.
Old 21st January 2013
  #28
Lives for gear
 
mickbenjamins's Avatar
I would reccomend either an iMac or a Macbook Pro Retina.
Dont buy a Mac Pro, they might have the speed but they lack the connection ports; no thunderbolt and no USB 3.

And then there is one question to decide between iMac and MBP Retina: do you want to be mobile?

iMac:
3.4GHz Quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.9GHz
16GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM - 2X8GB (go to your local Apple Premium Reseller and ask them to make you a deal on the 32GB)
3TB Fusion Drive
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680MX 2GB GDDR5


Macbook Pro Retina:
2.7GHz Quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.7GHz
16GB 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM
512GB Flash Storage
Old 21st January 2013
  #29
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
I bought a 15" MacBook pro w/retina when they were released.

No computer is perfect but it is the best machine I ever owned.

The largest project I have run in protools has been 20 tracks with plugins and various bussing...everything worked with no major issues.

My 2 cents....

Ben


Sent from my Galaxy Nexus
Old 22nd January 2013 | Show parent
  #30
Lives for gear
 
skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke ➑️
Need ot not need. If you have one and it breaks down, you will have to buy another one. They break down. At least in my world, they do.
So you're saying that you periodically spend $3,000 on Mac Pros, presumably buy Applecare, but right after the 3 year warranty expires "they break down" -- irretrievably, apparently -- and you need to immediately buy a new one.

Color me skeptical, sorry.
πŸ“ Reply

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 5805 views: 1868740
Avatar for Drumsound
Drumsound 5 hours ago
replies: 62 views: 66422
Avatar for Alex Kretov
Alex Kretov 27th May 2019
replies: 295 views: 72484
Avatar for anguswoodhead
anguswoodhead 26th March 2013
replies: 1296 views: 178748
Avatar for heraldo_jones
heraldo_jones 1st February 2016
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump